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Literary Devices. August 17, 2011. Point of View. First Person Narrator of the story Knows everything firsthand The use of I and me are used. Third Person -No participation -Knows how the character feels Third Person -Omniscient (unlimited narrator) Third Person

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literary devices

Literary Devices

August 17, 2011

point of view
Point of View
  • First Person
    • Narrator of the story
    • Knows everything firsthand
    • The use of I and me are used.

Third Person

-No participation

-Knows how the character feels

Third Person

-Omniscient (unlimited narrator)

Third Person

Limited Omniscient (limited to one character)

slide3
Tone
  • Tone: the writer\'s attitude toward the material and/or readers. Tone may be playful, formal, intimate, angry, serious, ironic, outraged, baffled, tender, serene, depressed, etc.
paradox
Paradox
  • A paradox in literature refers to the use of concepts/ ideas that are contradictory to one another, yet, when placed together they hold significant value on several levels. The uniqueness of paradoxes lies in the fact that a deeper level of meaning and significance is not revealed at first glace, but when it does crystallize, it provides astonishing insight.
examples of a paradox
Examples of a Paradox
  • “I’m sad but I’m laughing.”-Alanis Morrissette
  • “I must be cruel to be kind.”-Shakespeare
bell ringer
Bell Ringer
  • Please head your paper.
  • What did you think about “The Little Mermaid?”
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