NWP Transition from AIX to Linux
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NWP Transition from AIX to Linux Lessons Learned. Dan Sedlacek AFWA Chief Engineer AFWA A5/8 14 MAR 2011. Overview. Introduction AFWA Architecture Applications run on HPC Original NWP Environment Linux Configuration TCO Comparison Lessons Learned Future Linux Plans Summary.

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NWP Transition from AIX to Linux Lessons Learned

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Nwp transition from aix to linux lessons learned

NWP Transition from AIX to Linux

Lessons Learned

Dan Sedlacek

AFWA Chief Engineer

AFWA A5/8

14 MAR 2011


Overview

Overview

Introduction

AFWA Architecture

Applications run on HPC

Original NWP Environment

Linux Configuration

TCO Comparison

Lessons Learned

Future Linux Plans

Summary


Introduction

Introduction

  • AFWA has a long history of AIX HPC environment

  • Air Force Weather Environment

    • Worldwide, 24x7x365, systems, weather data and product support

    • Headquarters, Operational Weather Squadrons (OWS), and Combat Weather Teams (CWTs), Climatological Center (14th WS)

    • 600+ systems across 4 distinct security enclaves

    • 16 million+ lines of code

    • ~1,000 software applications supported

  • As model resolutions improve and processing requirements soar, AFWA requirements for NWP processing capability have increased dramatically

  • SEMS (in-house support contractor) performed a study, evaluating IBM, HP, and Cray

  • Red Hat Linux on HP hardware

  • Transitioning from IBM/AIX to HP/Linux has resulted in a significant savings in Total Cost of Ownership (TCO)


Afwa architecture unclassified only

AFWA Architecture(Unclassified Only)


Applications run on hpc

Applications Run on HPC

  • Run Regional Models

    • WRF

    • WRF Chem

    • CDFS II (future)

    • Dust

    • LIS

  • Run Global UM

  • Ensembles

  • Model post-processing

  • Misc space products


Original nwp environment unclassified

Original NWP Environment(Unclassified)


Free hardware adventure

“Free” Hardware Adventure

  • In 2008 AFWA evaluated JVN (available from HPCMO Modernization)

    • 1024 compute nodes

    • 36 racks of equipment

    • 589 KW power requirements

    • 161 tons of cooling

  • The “Free” hardware was not cost-effective

  • SEMS performed a study to evaluate alternatives

  • New hardware was more cost effective

    • Less space

    • Less power

    • Less cooling

    • More Flops

    • Lower TCO

    • Decision made to pursue Linux HPC solution


Afwa unclassified hpc configuration

AFWA Unclassified HPC Configuration


Linux configuration prod 8 dc3

Linux ConfigurationProd 8/DC3

OS: Linux RHEL 5.3

File System: Lustere

Disk: 50 TB

I/O Bandwidth: 900 Mb/s throughput

Chipset (2) ) 2.53 GHz Intel Nehalem E5540 quad-core CPUs per node

Compute Blades: 128

Cores/Memory: 1024 cores, 3GB per core

Processing capacity: 10 TeraFlops (Production)

Test and development system (DC3): 5 TeraFlops


Tco comparison

TCO Comparison

Original 10 TeraFlops of IBM/AIX HPC O&M (non-labor) - $1.4M

Nominally $133K per TeraFlop for IBM/AIX HPC

Annual projected O&M costs for Linux (now totalling 24 TeraFlops) - $ 1M

Conservatively, $30K per TeraFlop for HP/Linux HPC

Bottom line: Linux HPC solution represented a significant savings


Lessons learned

Lessons Learned

  • Not all “free” hardware is desirable (JVN)

    • Differences in Linux vs. AIX compilers (minor, but require modifications)

  • Significant tuning differences between AIX and Linux

  • File system configurations significantly different (Lustere/IBRIX vs GPFS)

  • Job scheduler differences had to be worked through

    (IBM Load Leveler vs. Platform LSF)

  • Full reduction of TCO doesn’t occur until previous OS support is no longer required

  • So far, Linux has been proven to be a reliable and cost-effective OS for NWP


Future linux plans

Future Linux Plans

5000+ core Linux cluster is being planned for delivery in August 2011

Represents 51 TeraFlopsof additional capability

Total HPC capacity by end of year 2011 > 90 TeraFlops

Total phase out of IBM/AIX HPC environment


Summary

Summary

  • Total Cost of Ownership is complex

    • Initial costs

    • Transition costs

    • Facility costs

    • Support costs

  • Linux does scale well

  • Linux is a viable and cost-effective HPC platform

  • Transitioning from IBM/AIX to HP/Linux has resulted in a significant TCO savings


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