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Apostrophe. Chapter 9. Seeing What You Know. Insert apostrophes where needed in the four sentences below. Then read the explanations that follow . 1. Its impossible for water to run uphill. 2. The prosecutor cant try any new cases until next month.

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Apostrophe

Apostrophe

Chapter 9


Seeing what you know
Seeing What You Know

  • Insert apostrophes where needed in the four sentences below. Then read the explanations that follow.

  • 1. Its impossible for water to run uphill.

  • 2. The prosecutor cant try any new cases until next month.

  • 3. No one likes the registrars new procedures for dropping a course.

  • 4. The omelets at the Greens diner are the best in town. Mrs. Green is the chef, and her husband is the host.


Seeing what you know1
Seeing What You Know

  • Insert apostrophes where needed in the four sentences below. Then read the explanations that follow.

  • 1. It’s impossible for water to run uphill.

  • 2. The prosecutor can’t try any new cases until next month.

  • 3. No one likes the registrar’s new procedures for dropping a course.

  • 4. The omelets at the Greens’diner are the best in town. Mrs. Green is the chef, and her husband is the host.


Apostrophe1
Apostrophe

Apostrophe in Contractions:

To show that one or more letters have been left out of a word. ( a shortened form of a word )

When two words are combined to make one word, an apostrophe is used to show where letters have been omitted. This is called a contraction.


Common contractions
Common contractions:

  • I + am = I’m (the letter a in am has been left out)

  • it + is = it’s (the i in is has been left out)

  • does + not = doesn’t (the o in not has been left out)

  • do + not = don’t (the o in not has been left out)

  • she + will = she’ll (the wi in will has been left out)

  • you + would = you’d (the woulin would has been left out)

  • will + not = won’t (o takes the place of ill; the o in not has been left out)


Four special contractions
Four Special Contractions

Don’t confuse certain tricky contractions with similar sounding possessive words!


Apostrophe to show possession
Apostrophe to show possession:

  • Possession expresses the idea that something belongs to someone or some other thing. For example, the truck owned by Sally, the radial tires are belonging to the car, or the Great Dane of the neighbor.

  • The omission represented by the apostrophe is actually the contraction of the word ‘has’.

    For example:

    Sally has a truck the car has radial tires

    Becomes Becomes

    Sally’s truck the car’s radial tires…


Do not use the apostrophe
Do Not Use The Apostrophe

  • Plurals are formed simply by adding an -s. Don’t use an apostrophe to form a plural!

    • Ted’s ropes are in the car.

      • Ted’shas an apostrophe, since it shows ownership. Ropes doesn’t, because it is just a plural.


Apostrophe with plural nouns
Apostrophe with plural nouns:

  • If the noun is in the plural form, already ending in ‘s’, then the use of a second ‘s’ would be clumsy. So the apostrophe sits in its own and the second ‘s’ is simply omitted.

  • For example:

    The dogs’ dishes…

    The boys’ careers…


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