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happy. un- = not; opposite of unhappy unclear unpaid unlock. Spec, spect , spic (to see, watch, or observe). circumspect circum = around, on all sides Dictionary—careful to consider all related circumstances before acting, judging, or deciding spectacular spectacle = a show

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Happy

happy

un- = not; opposite of

unhappy

unclear

unpaid

unlock


Spec spect spic to see watch or observe
Spec, spect, spic (to see, watch, or observe)

  • circumspect

    • circum = around, on all sides

    • Dictionary—careful to consider all related circumstances before acting, judging, or deciding

      spectacular

      spectacle = a show

      -ar = a noun or adjective forming suffix

      Dictionary—an elaborate show or display (noun); of or like a spectacle, or show 2. unusual to a striking degree; characterized by a great display, as of daring



"A morpheme is the smallest things in his life.meaningful linguistic unit. Compound words, prefixes, suffixes, and roots are the morphemes helpful for students learning to read and write because they are use in hundreds of words" (Henry, 2003, p. 38).


Attention to word parts to reveal the meanings of unfamiliar words is a process that goes on all the time. For instance, if a reader encounters a word such as "patricide" in a contextual setting, the reader is likely to focus on the morphemes of the word, "patri-" and "-cide" to determine its meaning, particularly if the context is anomalous, or provides no clear interpretation. Such a anomalous context would be:


Robert has committed patricide uxoricide is the ultimate form of martial abuse
Robert has committed patricide. unfamiliar words is a process that goes on all the time. For instance, if a reader encounters a word such as "patricide" in a contextual setting, the reader is likely to focus on the morphemes of the word, "Uxoricide is the ultimate form of martial abuse.


Two types of morphemes

Two types of morphemes:   unfamiliar words is a process that goes on all the time. For instance, if a reader encounters a word such as "patricide" in a contextual setting, the reader is likely to focus on the morphemes of the word, "

Free morphemes are generally Anglo-Saxon base words that can stand alone as a word in English. These words may be made up of one or more syllables (elephant, hermit, cat, dollar, etc.).


Two types of morphemes1
Two types of morphemes: unfamiliar words is a process that goes on all the time. For instance, if a reader encounters a word such as "patricide" in a contextual setting, the reader is likely to focus on the morphemes of the word, "

  • Bound morphemes work as meaningful units only in combination with other morphemes.

  • Bound morphemes must be combined with others and never stand alone (spiteful, womanly, defected, amorous)" (Moats, 2000, p. 61).

  • These include the suffixes that are grammatical endings such as -ed, -est, and -ing.

  • Bound roots; and prefixes and suffixes, including parts such as peri-, ex-, bi-, fer-, tract, -ject, -ity, - ible, and -ment.


The Hunger Games unfamiliar words is a process that goes on all the time. For instance, if a reader encounters a word such as "patricide" in a contextual setting, the reader is likely to focus on the morphemes of the word, "


distraction unfamiliar words is a process that goes on all the time. For instance, if a reader encounters a word such as "patricide" in a contextual setting, the reader is likely to focus on the morphemes of the word, "pg. 324

dis- = apart

tract = to draw

distract = to draw apart; to draw (the mind, attention, etc.) away in another direction; divert

-tion = noun forming suffix meaning the act of ____ing

I have a feeling it drove Cato to distraction.


disturbingly unfamiliar words is a process that goes on all the time. For instance, if a reader encounters a word such as "patricide" in a contextual setting, the reader is likely to focus on the morphemes of the word, "pg. 325

dis- = intens.

turb = to disorder

-ing = the act or instance of

-ly = suffix forming adverbs

Peeta shakes his head. “No, he’s keeping a disturbingly low profile.”


Inadvertently pg 332

inadvertently unfamiliar words is a process that goes on all the time. For instance, if a reader encounters a word such as "patricide" in a contextual setting, the reader is likely to focus on the morphemes of the word, "(pg. 332)

in- = not

ad- = to

vert = to turn

advert = to call attention or turn one’s attention (to)

-ent = forming adjectives that shows or does advertent adj. = paying attention; heedful

-ly = suffix forming adverbs (modifying a verb, adj., phrase)

As it dies the creature lashes out, inadvetently, opening gashes on a few of its companions.


unintelligible unfamiliar words is a process that goes on all the time. For instance, if a reader encounters a word such as "patricide" in a contextual setting, the reader is likely to focus on the morphemes of the word, "pg. 332

un- = a prefix no, not, lack of, the opposite of

inter- = between; among

logic = a word, reckoning, thought [base is leg which means to gather; pick; choose]

-a(i)ble = suffix forming adjectives [worthy of being ___________ed]

He coughs out something unintelligible.


preoccupied unfamiliar words is a process that goes on all the time. For instance, if a reader encounters a word such as "patricide" in a contextual setting, the reader is likely to focus on the morphemes of the word, "pg. 332

pre- = prefix meaning before in time, earlier (than)

ob- = prefix meaning completely, totally

cup (capere) = to take possession of; possess

-ed = of an ending of past tense

Then I remember Cato waiting at the top and whip around, but he’s doubled over with cramps and apparently more preoccupied with the mutts than us.


Apparently pg 332

apparently unfamiliar words is a process that goes on all the time. For instance, if a reader encounters a word such as "patricide" in a contextual setting, the reader is likely to focus on the morphemes of the word, "pg. 332

ap (ad-) = to

par (pearere) = to come forth, be visible

-ent = adj. forming suffix

-ly = adverb forming suffix

Then I remember Cato waiting at the top and whip around, but he’s doubled over with cramps and apparently more preoccupied with the mutts than us.


recognition unfamiliar words is a process that goes on all the time. For instance, if a reader encounters a word such as "patricide" in a contextual setting, the reader is likely to focus on the morphemes of the word, "pg. 334

re- = again

cogn = to know

-tion = noun forming suffix meaning the act of ____ing

I hear Peeta’s gasp of recognition.


revoked unfamiliar words is a process that goes on all the time. For instance, if a reader encounters a word such as "patricide" in a contextual setting, the reader is likely to focus on the morphemes of the word, "pg. 342

re- = back

vok (vocare) to call

-ed = of an ending of past tense

The earlier revision has been revoked.


Revision pg 342

revision unfamiliar words is a process that goes on all the time. For instance, if a reader encounters a word such as "patricide" in a contextual setting, the reader is likely to focus on the morphemes of the word, "pg. 342

re- = back

vis = to see (revise = to change or amend)

-ion = noun forming suffix meaning the act of ____ing

The earlier revision has been revoked.


asphyxiation unfamiliar words is a process that goes on all the time. For instance, if a reader encounters a word such as "patricide" in a contextual setting, the reader is likely to focus on the morphemes of the word, "pg. 336

a- = not

sphyx (ks) = to throb

-tion = noun forming suffix meaning the act of ____ing

Loss of consciousness as a result of too little oxygen and too much carbon dioxide in the blood

If I don’t do something quickly, he’ll die of asphyxiation and then I’ll have lost him and Cato will probably use his body as a weapon against me.


communicate unfamiliar words is a process that goes on all the time. For instance, if a reader encounters a word such as "patricide" in a contextual setting, the reader is likely to focus on the morphemes of the word, "pg. 333

com- = together

muni (mei) = to exchange

-ate = verb forming suffix (to form produce)

Dictionary: to give or exchange information

This must be how they communicate because the pack backs up as if to make room.


reflexively unfamiliar words is a process that goes on all the time. For instance, if a reader encounters a word such as "patricide" in a contextual setting, the reader is likely to focus on the morphemes of the word, "pg. 336

re- = back

flex = to bend

-ive = having the nature or quality of [supportive] 2 tending to, given to [retrospective]

-ly = suffix forming adverbs (modifying a verb, adj., phrase)

He cries out reflexively and releases Peeta who slams back against him.


indication unfamiliar words is a process that goes on all the time. For instance, if a reader encounters a word such as "patricide" in a contextual setting, the reader is likely to focus on the morphemes of the word, "pg. 340

in- = to

dict = to point out, declare

-ate = verb forming suffix (to form produce)

-tion = noun forming suffix meaning the act of ____ing

Dictionary: something that points out

The only indication of the passage of time lies in the heaves, the subtle shift of the moon.


eliminating unfamiliar words is a process that goes on all the time. For instance, if a reader encounters a word such as "patricide" in a contextual setting, the reader is likely to focus on the morphemes of the word, "pg. 343

e- = out

limi (limen) = threshold (akin to boundary)

-ate = verb forming suffix (to form produce)

-ing = the act or instance of

Dictionary-to take out; remove; get rid of (original meaning to turn out of doors, banish)

He leans down and rips the bandage off his led, eliminating the final barrier between his blood and the earth.


desperately unfamiliar words is a process that goes on all the time. For instance, if a reader encounters a word such as "patricide" in a contextual setting, the reader is likely to focus on the morphemes of the word, "pg. 343

de- = without

sper (sperare) = to hope

-ate = adj. having or filled with

-ly = suffix forming adverbs (modifying a verb, adj., phrase)

Dictionary: a) driven to or resulting from loss of hope; rash or violent because of despair b)having a very great desire, need, ect.

I’m on my knees, desperately plastering the bandage back onto his wound.


inexplicably unfamiliar words is a process that goes on all the time. For instance, if a reader encounters a word such as "patricide" in a contextual setting, the reader is likely to focus on the morphemes of the word, "pg. 3

in- = not

ex- = out

plic (plicare) = to fold

-a(i)ble = suffix forming adjectives [worthy of being ___________ed]

-ly = suffix forming adverbs (modifying a verb, adj., phrase)

Dictionary: that cannot be explained

My first arrow hits his chest and inexplicably falls aside.


Adversaries pg 79

adversaries unfamiliar words is a process that goes on all the time. For instance, if a reader encounters a word such as "patricide" in a contextual setting, the reader is likely to focus on the morphemes of the word, "pg. 79

ad- = to

veres = turn opposite

-ary = noun forming

-es = plural

Dictionary: a person who opposes or fights against another

Presenting ourselves not as adversaries but as friends has distinguished us as much as the fiery costumes.


Distinguished pg 79
distinguished unfamiliar words is a process that goes on all the time. For instance, if a reader encounters a word such as "patricide" in a contextual setting, the reader is likely to focus on the morphemes of the word, "pg. 79

  • dis- = apart

  • tingu(stinguere) = to prick, pierce

  • -ish = verb forming suffix

  • -ed = past tense

  • Dictionary: to separate and classify

  • Presenting ourselves not as adversaries but as friends has distinguished us as much as the fiery costumes.


Irredeemably pg 104
irredeemably unfamiliar words is a process that goes on all the time. For instance, if a reader encounters a word such as "patricide" in a contextual setting, the reader is likely to focus on the morphemes of the word, "pg. 104

  • in- = no, not, without: it becomes ir- before r

  • re- = back

  • deem (emere) to get, buy

  • -a(i)ble = suffix forming adjectives [worthy of being ___________ed]

  • -ly = suffix forming adverbs (modifying a verb, adj., phrase)

  • Dictionary: that cannot be changed; hopeless

  • The number, which is between one and twelve, one being irredeemably bad and twelve being unattainably high, signifies the promise of the tribute.


Unattainably pg 104
unattainably unfamiliar words is a process that goes on all the time. For instance, if a reader encounters a word such as "patricide" in a contextual setting, the reader is likely to focus on the morphemes of the word, "pg. 104

  • un- = no, not

  • ad- = to; becomes at- before t

  • tain(tangere) = to touch

  • -a(i)ble = suffix forming adjectives [worthy of being ___________ed]

  • -ly = suffix forming adverbs (modifying a verb, adj., phrase)

  • Dictionary: not able to gain through effort; accomplish, achieve

  • The number, which is between one and twelve, one being irredeemably bad and twelve being unattainably high, signifies the promise of the tribute.


Magnanimous mag na n m s
magnanimous unfamiliar words is a process that goes on all the time. For instance, if a reader encounters a word such as "patricide" in a contextual setting, the reader is likely to focus on the morphemes of the word, "mag-ˈna-nə-məs

  • magni- = great, big, large

  • anim (animus) = mind, soul

  • -ous = adj. forming suffix

  • Dictionary: high-souled, noble in mind generous in overlooking injury or insult; rising above pettiness or meanness

  • I’m willing to give you the first shot. Am I not the most magnanimous of murderers?


Recalcitrant ri kal s tr nt
recalcitrant unfamiliar words is a process that goes on all the time. For instance, if a reader encounters a word such as "patricide" in a contextual setting, the reader is likely to focus on the morphemes of the word, "ri-ˈkal-sə-trənt

  • re- = back

  • calcitr(calcitrare) to kick

  • -ant = adj. forming suffix

  • Dictionary: refusing to obey authority 2. hard to handle or deal with

  • He might be a bit recalcitrant at present, but he’ll come across.


Malevolently m le v l nt l
malevolently unfamiliar words is a process that goes on all the time. For instance, if a reader encounters a word such as "patricide" in a contextual setting, the reader is likely to focus on the morphemes of the word, "mə-ˈle-və-lənt-lē

  • male (mal) = evil

  • vol(volens) = to wish

  • -ent = adj. forming suffix

  • -ly = adverb forming suffix

  • Dictionary: wishing evil or harm to others

  • He touched the door handle with a saliva-tipped fingertip, and it hissed malevolently at him.


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