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Challenges for Media Specialists. Challenge #1 Administrators, teachers, and parents sometimes consider graphic novels to be less worthy of attention than other forms of text.

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Challenges

for

Media Specialists


Challenge #1

Administrators, teachers, and parents sometimes consider graphic novels to be less worthy of attention than other forms of text.

Graphic novels include advanced vocabulary and sentence structure that can help prepare students for academic work and standardized tests (Mooney, 2002).


Challenge #2

The visual content of graphic novels may be unacceptable to some parents, teachers, and administrators.

  • Graphic novels are highly visual, but this does not mean that they necessarily contain mature or violent content.

  • Media specialists need to consider the individual merits of each text before deciding whether to include it in the collection (Rudiger & Schliesman, 2007).

  • Images need to be evaluated carefully, as they are potentially more inflammatory than words (Carter, 2009).


Challenge # 3

Students are just looking at the pictures – they’re not really reading!

  • As literature, comics are "a layering of text, visual and pictorial.” (Carter, 2009).

  • It can be difficult to skim a comic book. The words and illustrations are meant to be read together.

  • Graphic novels require students to use more complex cognitive skills than reading text alone (Schwartz, 2002).


Challenge #4

It can be hard to

locate age- appropriate materials.

  • Many publications such as School Library Journal and Booklist offer pertinent reviews of graphic novels, grouped by grade or age-appropriateness.


Challenge #5

It can be difficult to find time to teach graphic novels.

  • Integrate graphic novels into thematic units by making connections to subject areas.

  • Study author’s craft by comparing graphic novels such as Art Spiegelman’sMaus to the writing of Anne Frank, Lois Lowry, or Elie Wiesel.

Source: Carter (2009)


Sources used
Sources Used:

Butcher, K. T., & Manning, M. L. (2004). Bringing Graphic Novels into a School’s Curriculum. The Clearing House, 78(2), 67-71. Retrieved October 17, 2009 from Wilson Web database.

Carter, J. B. (2009). Going Graphic. Educational Leadership, 66(6), 68-72. Retrieved October 17, 2009 from Wilson Web database.

Dickinson, G. (2007). The question: Where should I shelve graphic novels?. Knowledge Quest,35(5), 56-57. Retrieved October 17, 2009 from Wilson Web database.


Sources used1
Sources Used:

Lyga, A. A. W., & Lyga, B. (2004) Graphic Novels in Your Media Center. Westport, CT: Libraries Unlimited.

Mooney, M. (2002). Graphic novels: How they can work in libraries. Book Report, 21(3), 18-19. Retrieved on October 17, 2009 from Wilson Web database.


Sources used2
Sources Used:

Rudiger, H. M., & Schliesman, M. (2007). Graphic Novels and School Libraries. Knowledge Quest, 36(2), 57-59. Retrieved October 17, 2009 from Wilson Web database.

Schwartz, G. E. (2002). Graphic Novels for Multiple Literacies. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy46(3), 262-265. Retrieved October 17, 2009 from Wilson Web database.

Weiner, S. (2002). Beyond Superheroes: Comics Get Serious. Library Journal, 127(2), 55-58. Retrieved October 17, 2009 from Wilson Web database.


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