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Alpha Decay basics. [Sec. 7.1/7.2/8.2/8.3 Dunlap]. Alpha decay Example Parent nucleus Cm-244. The daughter isotope is Pu-240. 96 Cm 244. 94 Pu 240. Why alpha particle instead of other light nuclei. Energy Q associated with the emission of various particles from a 235 U nucleus.

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Alpha decay basics

Alpha Decaybasics

[Sec. 7.1/7.2/8.2/8.3 Dunlap]


Alpha decay Example

Parent nucleus Cm-244. The daughter isotope is Pu-240

96Cm244

94Pu240


Why alpha particle instead of other light nuclei

Energy Q associated with the emission of various particles from a 235U nucleus.


There are always two questions that can be asked about any decay in atomic, nuclear or particle physics: (i) How much kinetic energy was released? and (ii) How quickly did it happen? (i.e. Energy? and Time?). Lets look at both of these questions for  decay.


Energy released q experiments
Energy Released Q decay in atomic, nuclear or particle physics: (i) How much kinetic energy was released? and (ii) How quickly did it happen? (i.e. Energy? and Time?). Lets look at both of these questions for  Experiments

 The above diagram (right) shows the experimental energy of release. The above diagram (left) shows the abundance of alpha emitters. Both diagrams are as a function of A. Can you see the relationship?


The energy of the particle t
The Energy of the α-particle, T decay in atomic, nuclear or particle physics: (i) How much kinetic energy was released? and (ii) How quickly did it happen? (i.e. Energy? and Time?). Lets look at both of these questions for α

Mass of X

Q

Mass of Y

+  particle

And the energy released in the decay is simply given by energy


The energy of the particle t1
The Energy of the α-particle, T decay in atomic, nuclear or particle physics: (i) How much kinetic energy was released? and (ii) How quickly did it happen? (i.e. Energy? and Time?). Lets look at both of these questions for α

Conserving energy and momentum one finds:

BEFORE

AFTER

+p, p2/8M

-p, P2/2AM


Energy released q
Energy Released Q decay in atomic, nuclear or particle physics: (i) How much kinetic energy was released? and (ii) How quickly did it happen? (i.e. Energy? and Time?). Lets look at both of these questions for .

This can be estimated from the SEMF by realizing that the B(Z,A) curve is rather smooth at large Z, and A and differential calculus can be used to calculate the B due to a change of 2 in Z and a change of 4 in A. Starting from (8.2) we also have:


There can be multiple alpha energies
There can be multiple alpha energies decay in atomic, nuclear or particle physics: (i) How much kinetic energy was released? and (ii) How quickly did it happen? (i.e. Energy? and Time?). Lets look at both of these questions for

This diagram shows the alpha decay to the 240Pu daughter nucleus – and this nucleus is PROLATE and able to ROTATE collectively.

Alpha decay can occur to any one of the excited states although not with the same probability.

For each decay:

where E is the excited state energy


Total angular momentum and parity need be conserved
Total angular momentum and parity need be conserved decay in atomic, nuclear or particle physics: (i) How much kinetic energy was released? and (ii) How quickly did it happen? (i.e. Energy? and Time?). Lets look at both of these questions for


Total angular momentum and parity need be conserved1

243 decay in atomic, nuclear or particle physics: (i) How much kinetic energy was released? and (ii) How quickly did it happen? (i.e. Energy? and Time?). Lets look at both of these questions for Am

5/2-

Total angular momentum and parity need be conserved

1.1%%

10.6%%

88%%

9/2-

0.172 MeV

0.12%%

0.16%%

7/2-

0.118 MeV

5/2-

0.075 MeV

7/2+

0.031 MeV

5/2+

0 MeV

239Np


How fast did it happen
How fast did it happen? decay in atomic, nuclear or particle physics: (i) How much kinetic energy was released? and (ii) How quickly did it happen? (i.e. Energy? and Time?). Lets look at both of these questions for

The mean life (often called just “the lifetime”) is defined simply as 1/ λ. That is the time required to decay to 1/e of the original population. We get:


The first decay rate experiments the geiger nuttal law
The first Decay Rate Experiments - The Geiger –Nuttal Law decay in atomic, nuclear or particle physics: (i) How much kinetic energy was released? and (ii) How quickly did it happen? (i.e. Energy? and Time?). Lets look at both of these questions for


The first decay rate experiments the geiger nuttal law1
The first Decay Rate Experiments - The Geiger –Nuttal Law decay in atomic, nuclear or particle physics: (i) How much kinetic energy was released? and (ii) How quickly did it happen? (i.e. Energy? and Time?). Lets look at both of these questions for

As early as 1907, Rutherford and coworkers had discovered that the -particles emitted from short-lived isotopes were more penetrating (i.e. had more energy). By 1912 his coworkers Geiger and Nuttal had established the connection between particle range R and emitter half-life . It was of the form:


The first decay rate experiments the geiger nuttal law2
The first Decay Rate Experiments - The Geiger –Nuttal Law decay in atomic, nuclear or particle physics: (i) How much kinetic energy was released? and (ii) How quickly did it happen? (i.e. Energy? and Time?). Lets look at both of these questions for


The one-body model of decay in atomic, nuclear or particle physics: (i) How much kinetic energy was released? and (ii) How quickly did it happen? (i.e. Energy? and Time?). Lets look at both of these questions for α-decay assumes that the α-particle is preformed in the nucleus, and confined to the nuclear interior by the Coulomb potential barrier. In the classical picture, if the kinetic energy of the -particle is less than the potential energy represented by the barrier height, the α-particle cannot leave the nucleus.

r=R

r=b

In the quantum-mechanical picture, however, there is a finite probability that the -particle will tunnel through the barrier and leave the nucleus.

The α-decay constant is then a product of the frequency of collisions with the barrier, or ``knocking frequency'‘ (vα/2R), and the barrier penetration probability PT.


How high and wide the barrier? decay in atomic, nuclear or particle physics: (i) How much kinetic energy was released? and (ii) How quickly did it happen? (i.e. Energy? and Time?). Lets look at both of these questions for

The height of the barrier is:

The width of the barrier is

w

30MeV

Lets calculate these for taking R0=1.2F, we have


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