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Rachel Vilsack Regional Labor Market Analyst MN Dept. of Employment & Economic Development St. Paul WorkForce Center. Green Jobs in Minnesota. About DEED’s regional analysts. Collaborate with regional stakeholders on new research Extend access to DEED reports and statistics

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Green jobs in minnesota

Rachel Vilsack

Regional Labor Market Analyst

MN Dept. of Employment & Economic Development

St. Paul WorkForce Center

Green Jobs in Minnesota


About deed s regional analysts
About DEED’s regional analysts

  • Collaborate with regional stakeholders on new research

  • Extend access to DEED reports and statistics

  • Conduct presentations and training onthe regional economy and labor market

  • Original research and analysis

  • Five regional analystsstationed across the state


What s green
What’s green?

  • There is no national definition of green industries, or green jobs, besides the general understanding that it is “environmentally friendly” or “beneficial to the environment.”

  • According to the U.S. Dept of Labor:

    “The green economy encompasses the economic activity related to reducing the use of fossil fuels, decreasing pollution and greenhouse gas emissions, increasing the efficiency of energy usage, recycling materials, and developing and adopting renewable sources of energy.”

  • Many organizations define the green economy to include business who produce renewable energy, produce green products, offer green services, or are involved in environmental conservation.


Examples of green industries
Examples of green industries

  • Utilities – solar, wind and hydroelectric power, energy storage, energy transmission/distribution

  • Construction – home construction, industrial building, residential remodelers, residential plumbing, HVAC, glass and glazing, roofing, siding, electrical, drywall, insulation

  • Manufacturing – HVAC equipment manufacturing, glass manufacturing, paper mills, electric lamp bulb and fixture manufacturing, household appliance manufacturing, power distribution and transformer manufacturing, battery manufacturing, automobile manufacturing, biofuels

  • Administrative and Waste Services - recycling, waste collection and remediation

  • Business and Professional Services – industrial design services, environmental consulting services, architectural services, engineering services

  • Government – conservation and pollution prevention, cleanup/safety, monitoring and compliance


So what s a green job
So what’s a “green” job?

  • Like a color scale, jobs are more or less green.

    • Less Green

      • 64 “increased demand” green occupations

    • More Green

      • 60 “enhanced skills” green occupations

    • Most Green

      • 91 “new and emerging” green occupations

Source: O*NET, “Greening of the World of Work,” June 2009.


Green increased demand occupations
Green increased demand occupations

  • Increase in employment due to impact of green economy activities and technology.

  • Work context may change, but tasks do not.

  • Examples:

    • Electricians

    • Agriculture Inspectors

    • Materials Scientists

    • Team Assemblers

    • Customer Service Representatives

    • Forest and Conservation Technicians

    • Welders

Source: O*NET, “Greening of the World of Work,” June 2009.


Green enhanced skills occupations
Green enhanced skills occupations

  • Impact of green economy significantly changes skills and requirements of workers.

  • Basic purpose of job stays the same, but tasks, skills, knowledge, credentials, etc., change.

  • Examples:

    • Civil Engineers

    • Construction Laborers

    • Landscape Architects

    • HVAC Mechanics and Installers

    • Automotive Specialty Technicians

    • Wholesale and Retail Buyers

Source: O*NET, “Greening of the World of Work,” June 2009.


Green new and emerging occupations
Green new and emerging occupations

  • Impact of green economy activities and technology creates unique work and requirements.

  • Creation of a new occupation, sometimes born from an existing occupation.

  • Examples:

    • Air Quality Control Specialists

    • Industrial Ecologists

    • Biofuels Processing Technicians

    • Carbon Credit Traders

    • Energy Auditors

    • Solar Photovoltaic Installers

    • Solar Sales Representatives

Source: O*NET, “Greening of the World of Work,” June 2009.



Percent of total products or services considered green by minnesota businesses
Percent of total products or services considered green by Minnesota businesses

Source: MN Dept. of Employment & Economic Development


Green practices of minnesota businesses
Green practices of Minnesota businesses Minnesota businesses

  • Minimize waste and energy in product distribution and end-use

  • Implement environmental corporate social responsibility into company polices and decisions

  • Support low-impact employee transportation (carpooling, mass transit, telecommuting)

  • Adopt pollution prevention best practices (e.g. reduce or eliminate pollution at the source)

  • Select suppliers that provide environmentally superior materials, products, and practices

  • Integrate green design approaches in facilities and sites

Source: MN Dept. of Employment & Economic Development


Current minnesota employees with green skills
Current Minnesota employees with green skills Minnesota businesses

Source: MN Dept. of Employment & Economic Development


Green skills or knowledge needed by minnesota businesses
Green skills or knowledge needed by Minnesota businesses Minnesota businesses

Source: MN Dept. of Employment & Economic Development


Barriers to implementing green practices for minnesota businesses
Barriers to implementing green practices for Minnesota businesses

Source: MN Dept. of Employment & Economic Development


Key observations
Key observations businesses

  • While green accounts for a large share of products or services for a small share of firms, it is clear that a large number of firms either currently perform or plan to perform green practices. Any company can have green practices, even if they don’t sell a green product or service.

  • Despite an economic recession, 20 percent of Minnesota businesses cited a shortage of workers currently having green knowledge or skills as a barrier to their implementation of green practices.

  • Employers plan to increase the number of workers with green skills in the coming year. Some of this growth will be in businesses that produce a green product or service, but respondents also valued practices that could be applied to many types of industries, such as energy conservation and waste reduction.


Minnesota-produced Labor Market Information is online at: businesses www.deed.state.mn.us

For a copy of this presentation,

please visit:

http://rachelvilsack.com

Follow Twin Cities labor market data – through me – on Twitter at:

http://twitter.com/rachelvilsack

Rachel Vilsack

Regional Labor Market Analyst

St. Paul WorkForce Center

Phone: 651.642.0728

[email protected]


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