Increasing tension
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Increasing tension . 1860 Nov. 6- Lincoln is elected as 16 th president Dec. 20- South Carolina secedes from the Union Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana , and Texas follow. Union uniform. Increasing tension CONT. 1861 Jan. 29- Kansas becomes 34 th state of the Union

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Increasing tension

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Increasing tension

Increasing tension

  • 1860

    • Nov. 6- Lincoln is elected as 16th

      president

    • Dec. 20- South Carolina secedes

      from the Union

    • Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia,

      Louisiana, and Texas follow

Union uniform


Increasing tension cont

Increasing tension CONT.

  • 1861

    • Jan. 29- Kansas becomes 34th state of the Union

    • Feb.

      • Confederate Constitution is created

      • Jefferson Davis inaugurated as president of the Confederacy

    • Virginia, Arkansas, North Carolina, and Tennessee succeed


Fort sumter

Fort Sumter

  • April 12-14

    • Confederate soldiers surround

      the Union fort in South Carolina

    • Forts were built defensively

      outward, left the rear exposed

    • Many other Union forts located in Confederate territory were given up upon succession


First manassas first battle of bull run

First Manassas (First Battle of bull run)

  • July 21

    • Confederate Victory

    • 50 miles from Washington D.C.

    • 5,000 collective casualties

    • “Stonewall” Jackson makes debut

    • Confederates defend Union attack, and launch counterattack

    • Union retreats

    • Proved the war would be long, and cost much loss of life

Items of a Confederate soldier


Initial stages of war

Initial stages of war

  • Nov. 8 1861

    • Confederacy looks to Britain as ally against the Union

    • Confederate commanders are arrested by British Navy at sea, ending further pursuit of collaboration

  • Feb. 6-16 1862

    • Confederate forts Henry and Donelson fall to Ulysses S. Grant

    • First major Union victories


Hampton roads

Hampton Roads

  • Mar. 7 1962

    • Most decisive naval battle of the war

    • First ever battle between ironclad ships

    • No clear winner

    • The world soon begins massive production of new class of ship, made with iron hulls

    • Confederates can not compete with the Union at sea


Shiloh

Shiloh

  • Apr. 6-7

    • Shiloh, Tennessee

    • Union victory

    • Over 23,000 casualties

    • More loss of life than all previous wars combined

Picture of Union soldiers at camp


Peninsula campaign

Peninsula Campaign

  • May 5- July 1

    • General McClellan makes attempt to capture Richmond

    • General Lee is given control of

    • confederates at Seven Pines

    • Fighting is long and drawn out,

    • McClellan is forced to retreat

A portrait of General Lee, one of the greatest tacticians of all time


Second manassas antietam fredericksburg

Second Manassas, Antietam, Fredericksburg

  • Aug. 28

    • Lee starts campaign into Maryland

    • Second Battle of Bull run ensues

    • Confederates win, and continue close to D.C.

  • Sep. 17

    • Battle of Antietam is bloodiest battle in American history to date

    • Forces retreat of Confederate troops

  • Dec. 13

    • Fredericksburg, Virginia

    • Confederate win

    • Over 17,000 casualties

Drums and bugle to improve moral and keep a marching beat


Lincoln

Lincoln

  • Dec. 31

    • Lincoln approves the creation of West Virginia

  • Jan. 1, 1863

    • The Emancipation Proclamation is issued

      • Executive Order, due to political gridlock

      • Freed slaved in rebel states

      • Did not grant citizenship, nor did it apply to any blacks in the North

      • Dedicated to Union effort for the rights of blacks

      • First step towards the 13th Amendment.


Gettysburg

Gettysburg

  • July 1-3

    • Largest battle ever on

      American soil

    • Over 51,000 casualties

      combined

    • Confederates sent

      wave after wave against Union line

    • Union victory protected Washington, D.C.

Photo of the carnage of Gettysburg


Chickamauga

Chickamauga

  • Confederacy currently split in half

  • Sep. 19-20

    • Confederates win the battle of Chickamauga, Georgia

    • Over 30,000 casualties

    • Union continues to press deep

      into the South

A Yankee artillery battery setting up position


Increasing tension

1864

  • Grant is named commander of all Union troops

  • Union is approaching Richmond,

  • May-June

    • The Wilderness

      • 29,000 casualties

    • Spotsylvania

      • 30,000 casualties

  • June 18- Petersburg

  • Sep. 2- Atlanta

  • Dec. 16- Franklin & Nashville

  • Dec. 22- Savannah

A painting of the Battle of Nashville


1865 demise of csa

1865- Demise of CSA

  • Feb. 17

    • Columbia, South Carolina falls to Union

  • Mar. 13

    • Confederate Congress allows slaves to be used as troops

  • Apr. 2-3

    • Lee abandons his Army

      at Petersburg

    • Confederate government

      flees Richmond

A Union battalion prepares to march


Resolution

Resolution

  • Apr. 9

    • Lee surrenders

  • Apr. 14

    • Lincoln assasinated

  • May 10

    • Jefferson Davis captured

  • Dec. 18

    • 13th Amendment is approved

Union model 1861 Springfield rifles


Works cited

Works Cited

Works Cited

“Causes of the Civil War.” Ket.org. Kentucky Educational Television, 2014. Web. 2 Mar. 2014.

Davis, William C. The Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Civil War. London: Salamander Books, 2001. Print.

Davis, William C. “Battle of Nashville Photo.” The Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Civil War. London: Salamander Books, 2001. Print.

Davis, William C. “Confederate Flag Photo.” The Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Civil War. London: Salamander Books, 2001. Print.

Davis, William C. “Drums Photo.” The Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Civil War.London: Salamander Books, 2001. Print.

Davis, William C. “Fort Sumter Destruction Photo.” The Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Civil War. London: Salamander Books, 2001. Print.

Davis, William C. “Gettysburg Photo.” The Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Civil War. London: Salamander Books, 2001. Print.

Davis, William C. “Robert E. Lee Photo.” The Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Civil War. London: Salamander Books, 2001. Print.

Davis, William C. “Union Camp Photo.” The Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Civil War. London: Salamander Books, 2001. Print.

Davis, William C. “Union Flag Photo.” The Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Civil War. London: Salamander Books, 2001. Print.

Davis, William C. “Union Soldier Photo.” The Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Civil War. London: Salamander Books, 2001. Print.

Davis, William C. “Union Springfield Rifles Photo.” The Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Civil War. London: Salamander Books, 2001. Print.

Davis, William C. “Union Uniform Photo.” The Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Civil War. London: Salamander Books,2001. Print.

Davis, William C. “Yankee Artillery Battery Photo.” The Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Civil War. London: Salamander Books, 2001. Print.

“Legacies of the Civil War.” www.tredegar.org. American Civil War Center. Web. 2 Mar. 2014.

“Timeline of the American Civil War.” Moc.org. The Museum of the Confederacy. Web. 4 Mar.

2014.


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