Line listing lesson
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 24

Line Listing Lesson PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 132 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Line Listing Lesson. Objectives: Create and maintain a line listing Explain why a line listing is an important part of an epidemiological investigation Explain how line listing techniques change according to the specific outbreak investigation. Introduction: Line Listing.

Download Presentation

Line Listing Lesson

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Line listing lesson

Line Listing Lesson

  • Objectives:

    • Create and maintain a line listing

    • Explain why a line listing is an important part of an epidemiological investigation

    • Explain how line listing techniques change according to the specific outbreak investigation


Introduction line listing

Introduction: Line Listing


What is a line listing

What is a Line Listing

  • A line listing is a method of organizing, storing, and analyzing potential cases that appear throughout the investigation.

  • A line listing allows information about time, person, and place to be organized and reviewed quickly.


When and why

When and Why


Using line lists to plan for the next step of an investigation

Using Line Lists to Plan for the Next Step of an Investigation

  • Find missing data

  • Explore trends

    • Gender

    • Age

    • Date of Onset

    • Geographic location

  • Create an Epi curve


Items to include in a line listing

Items to Include in a Line Listing

  • Identifying information

    • Full Name or ID number of potential cases

  • Clinical information

    • Symptoms

    • Date of symptom onset

    • Date of diagnosis

  • Demographic information

    • Gender, age, race, occupation

  • Geographic information

    • Place of residence, place of work

  • Exposure information

    • Potential sources of disease exposure

  • Other items could include:

    • Dietary habits, sexual behavior, recreational activities, or hobbies


Sources of information for a line listing

Sources of Information for a Line Listing

  • Interview with patients/health care providers

  • School attendance sheets

  • Medical records

  • Business receipts

  • Party guest lists

  • Surveys

  • Questionnaires

  • Etc…..


Tools used to create a line listing

Tools Used to Create a Line Listing

  • By hand:

    • Pen and Paper

  • Electronically:

    • Microsoft Excel

    • Microsoft Access

    • EpiInfo (www.cdc.gov/epiinfo/index.htm)


How to make a line listing

How to Make a Line Listing

  • Develop a table

  • Each row identifies a single case

  • Each column describes a variable of interest

  • Update the line listing as new information becomes available

  • Use abbreviations or codes to keep the line listing simple


Example 1

Example 1


Dengue fever line listing

Example 2

Dengue Fever Line Listing


Example 3

Example 3

Line Listing regarding the Outbreak of Serious Birth Defects, 2002


Conclusion

Conclusion

  • Line listing is integral to an outbreak investigation

  • Allows investigator to organize, store, and analyze information

  • Provides information about the source of the outbreak, the disease involved, and populations most likely to have been affected

  • Helps create an epi curve for the outbreak

  • Line listing is an important skill that can be applied to a wide range of epidemiological investigations


Question

Question

  • Why is it important to make a line listing? (check all that apply)

    • To organize information coming from different sources

    • To better understand the nature and path of an outbreak

    • To refine a case definition

    • To enable data sharing between different investigators


Answer

Answer

  • Why is it important to make a line listing? (check all that apply)

    • To organize information coming from different sources

    • To better understand the nature and path of an outbreak

    • To refine a case definition

    • To enable data sharing between different investigators

  • Answer: All of the above are reasons why it is important to make a line listing.


Question1

Question

  • When would it be appropriate to use an identification (ID) number instead of a full name?

    • When the line listing will only be used internally

    • When the line listing will be shared with other agencies


Answer1

Answer

  • When would it be appropriate to use an identification (ID) number instead of a full name?

    • When the line listing will only be used internally

    • When the line listing will be shared with other agencies

  • Answer: (b) It is appropriate to use an ID number instead of a full name when the line listing will be shared with other agencies. This is to protect the confidentiality of the case whose information is presented.


Question2

Question

  • What are some common sources of information for a line listing?

    (check all that apply)

    • Patient records

    • School attendance lists

    • Party guest lists

    • Survey data

    • Interviews


Answer2

Answer

  • What are some common sources of information for a line listing?

    (check all that apply)

    • Patient records

    • School attendance lists

    • Party guest lists

    • Survey data

    • Interviews

  • Answer: All of the above are common sources of information for a line listing.


Question3

Question

  • In a line listing, the data should be organized with:

    • Individual cases in each column and variables in each row

    • Individual cases in each column and other cases in each row

    • Variables in each column and other variables in each row

    • Individual cases in each row and variables in each column


Answer3

Answer

  • In a line listing, the data should be organized with:

    • Individual cases in each column and variables in each row

    • Individual cases in each column and other cases in each row

    • Variables in each column and other variables in each row

    • Individual cases in each row and variables in each column

  • Answer: (d) In a line listing, the data should be organized with individual cases in each row and variables in each column.


Question4

Question

  • To keep line listings simple

    • Eliminate variables

    • Include fewer cases

    • Use abbreviations or coding, with accompanying key


Answer4

Answer

  • To keep line listings simple

    • Eliminate variables

    • Include fewer cases

    • Use abbreviations or coding, with accompanying key

  • Answer: (a,c) To keep line listings simple, use abbreviations or coding, with accompanying key. Some variables may be eliminated as the case definition is further refined, but it may be necessary to keep the line listing broad in the beginning so that potential contributors to the outbreak are not overlooked. As many cases as possible should be included in the line listing to enable better tracing or the disease and to better understand potential sources of the outbreak.


References

References

  • Torok, M. and the FOCUS Workgroup. Case finding and line listing: a guide for investigators. Focus on Field Epidemiology. 1(4):1-6. Available at: http://nccphp.sph.unc.edu/focus/issuelist.htm. Accessed December 5, 2007.

  • Nair, Alison. Public health measurement. PowerPoint presentation for the CDC Ambassador Program; June, 2004.


  • Login