Elements of literature and poetry
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Elements of Literature and Poetry. Setting. The time and place in which the events of a literary work occurs. The setting includes not only physical surroundings but also the: Ideas Customs Values And beliefs of the people who live there. Louisiana. Laizzes les bon temps rouler!.

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Elements of Literature and Poetry

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Elements of literature and poetry

Elements of Literature and Poetry


Setting

Setting

  • The time and place in which the events of a literary work occurs.

  • The setting includes not only physical surroundings but also the:

    • Ideas

    • Customs

    • Values

    • And beliefs of the people who live there.


Louisiana

Louisiana

Laizzes les bon temps rouler!


Characterization

Characterization

  • The methods used to reveal the personality of a character.

  • Direct Characterization - The author describes a character’s personality.

  • Indirect Characterization - The author suggests traits through the character’s:

    • Words

    • Actions

    • Appearance

    • As well as through the reactions of other characters to the person being portrayed.


Irony

Irony

A contrast or discrepancy between expectation and reality.

  • Verbal Irony - When a person says one thing while meaning another.

  • Situational Irony - When the outcome of a situation is the opposite of what someone expected.

  • Dramatic Irony - When the audience or reader knows something that the characters do not know.


Diction

Diction

The author’s word choice, or use of appropriate words to convey a particular meaning. Vocabulary used by a writer.

Denotation – The meaning of a word found in the dictionary.

Connotation – What a writer implies or how a situation or usage adds to the meaning.


Two headlines and lead paragraphs of two articles from the same day same incident march 11 2003

Two Headlines and Lead Paragraphs of Two Articles From the Same Day, Same Incident (March 11, 2003)

The New York Times

Iraq forces suspension of

U.S. surveillance flights

Iraqi fighter jets threatened two

American U-2 surveillance planes,

forcing them to return to abort their

mission and return to base, senior

U.S. officials said Tuesday.

USA TodayU.N. Withdraws U-2 Planes

U.N. arms inspectors said Tuesday they had withdrawn two U-2 reconnaissance planes over Iraq for safety reasons after Baghdad complained both aircraft were in the air simultaneously.


Elements of literature and poetry

Tone

  • A reflection of the writer’s attitude toward a subject as conveyed through such elements as:

    • Word choice

    • Punctuation

    • Sentence structure

    • And figures of speech.

  • A writer’s tone may convey a variety of attitudes such as sympathy, irony, sadness, or bitterness.


Elements of literature and poetry

Mood

  • The emotional quality, or atmosphere, of a work of literature.

  • A number of elements may contribute to creating mood, such as:

    • The writer’s choice of language

    • Subject matter

    • Setting

    • Tone

    • As well as sound devices such as rhyme, rhythm, and meter.


Foreshadowing

Foreshadowing

The author’s use of hints or clues to prepare the readers for events that will happen later in a narrative.


Foreshadowing examples

Foreshadowing Examples

  • Sam wished he could rid himself of the sick feeling in his gut that told him something terrible was going to happen, and happen soon.

  • As the dark clouds rolled in, a brisk wind raised bumps all over my skin.

  • When a character displays a gun or knife early in the story. Merely the appearance of a deadly weapon, even though it is used for an unrelated purpose — such as being cleaned or whittling wood — suggests terrible consequences later on.


Allusion

Allusion

  • A reference in a work of literature to a well-known:

    • Person

    • Place

    • Event

    • Written work

    • Or work of art.

  • Discovering the meaning of an allusion can often be essential to the understanding of a work.


Elements of literature and poetry

The Bible


Elements of literature and poetry

Greek and Roman Mythology


Some examples of allusion

Some Examples of Allusion

  • "As the cave's roof collapsed, he was swallowed up in the dust like Jonah, and only his frantic scrabbling behind a wall of rock indicated that there was anyone still alive".

  • "Christy didn't like to spend money. She was no Scrooge, but she seldom purchased anything except the bare necessities".

  • "Like the prodigal son, he returned to his home town and was welcomed by all who knew him". Marty's presence at the dance was definitely a 'Catch 22' situation; if he talked to Cindy she'd be mad at him, but if he ignored her there'd be hell to pay. His anger bubbled to the surface. He realized that by coming to the dance he had brought his problems with him like a Trojan Horse, and he could only hope he would be able to keep them bottled up".


Elements of literature and poetry

  • Performed by Dean Martin

  • (In Napoli where love is kingWhen boy meets girl here's what they say)

  • When the moon hits your eye like a big pizza pieThat's amoreWhen the world seems to shine like you've had too much wineThat's amoreBells will ring ting-a-ling-a-ling, ting-a-ling-a-lingAnd you'll sing "Vita Bella"Hearts will play tippy-tippy-tay, tippy-tippy-tayLike a gay tarantella

  • When the stars make you drool just like a pasta fagioleThat's amoreWhen you dance down the street with a cloud at your feetYou're in loveWhen you walk in a dream but you know you're notDreaming signoreScuzza me, but you see, back in old NapoliThat's amore

  • When the moon hits you eye like a big pizza pieThat's amore(That's amore)When the world seems to shine like you've had too much wineThat's amore(That's amore)Bells will ring ting-a-ling-a-ling, ting-a-ling-a-lingAnd you'll sing "Vita bella"Hearts will play tippy-tippy-tay, tippy-tippy-tayLike a gay tarantella(Lucky fella)

  • When the stars make you drool just like a pasta fagioleThat's amoreWhen you dance down the street with a cloud at your feetYou're in loveWhen you walk in a dream but you know you're notDreaming signoreScuzza me, but you see, back in old NapoliThat's amore(Amore)That's amore


Simile

Simile

  • Compares two unlike things by using like or as.

  • See I drop the greats like clumsy waiters drop plates. – Mr. Man

  • Me without a mic is like a beat without a snare. . .

    – Lauryn Hill


Metaphor

Metaphor

  • A comparison that shows how two things that are not alike in most ways are similar in one important way.

  • Unlike similes that use the words “as” or “like” to make a comparison, metaphors state that something is something else.


Metaphor by shakespeare

Metaphor by Shakespeare

  • “Life's but a walking shadow.”

  • “The sun's a thief.”

  • “Juliet is the sun.”

  • “All the world’s a stage, and all the men and women merely player; they have their exits and their entrances;”


Hyperbole

Hyperbole

  • A hyperbole is an exaggeration.

    • "I nearly died laughing,"

    • "I was hopping mad,"

    • "I tried a thousand times."

  • These statements are not literally true, but people make them to sound impressive or to emphasize something, such as a:

    • Feeling

    • Effort

    • Or reaction.


  • Hyperbole confusion

    Hyperbole Confusion

    • It is often confused with a simile or a metaphor because it often compares two objects. The difference is a hyperbole is an exaggeration.

    • For example: His feet were as big as a barge.

    • It looks like a simile, but it is comparing foot size to the size of a barge. Everyone knows that a barge is approximately 700 feet long.


    The end

    The End


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