Pronouns
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Pronouns. Agreement and Case Rules. Pronoun A greement. Pronouns must agree with their antecedents in number (singular or plural). The ballerinas tied their pointe shoe ribbons. Indefinite Pronouns have special rules. Singular indefinite Pronoun: always singular .

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Pronouns

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Pronouns

Pronouns

Agreement and Case Rules


Pronoun a greement

Pronoun Agreement

  • Pronouns must agree with their antecedents in number (singular or plural).

    • The ballerinas tied theirpointe shoe ribbons.

  • Indefinite Pronouns have special rules.

  • Singular indefinite Pronoun: always singular.

  • No one would admit his or her mistake.


Singular plural indefinite pronouns

Singular/Plural Indefinite Pronouns

  • Special Rule: Modified by a prepositional phrase pronoun agreement depends on whether the object of the preposition is countable (plural is used) or uncountable (singular is used).

    • Someof the gumballs fell out of their container when Billy tripped. (It is possible to count gumballs individually plural)


Pronoun case

Pronoun Case

Case: refers to the pronoun’s function in the sentence.

Courtesy of Mrs. P


Nominative case

Nominative Case

  • Pronoun acts as the subject of the sentence

  • Example: “We represent the Lollipop Guild.”

  • Special Rule: When a noun or pronoun follows a linking verb and identifies as the subject of the sentencenominative case.

    • Example: This is I.


Pronoun case1

Pronoun Case

  • Type 2: Objective Case:

    • Pronoun acts as the object of the action (direct or indirect).

  • Example: While on vacation, my cat sends him postcards.

  • Him is the receiver of the action sends postcards.


Possessive case

PossessiveCase

  • Pronoun that indicates possession.

  • Never use an apostrophe in the plural form of a possessive pronoun

    • Ex: Our’s, your’s, etc..


Who vs whom

Who vs. Whom

  • Use Who/Whoever:

  • Functions as the subject.

  • Who ate the last cookie?

  • Who is doing the eating?

  • Use Whom/Whomever:

  • Functions as the object.

  • To whom did Glen Coco send candy cane grams?

  • To whom is referring to the receivers of Glen Coco’s candy cane grams.


Who versus whom

Who versus Whom?

  • The musician, who/whom I read about in the tabloids, really is a jerk in real life.

  • Answer: Whom

  • Rule: Figuring out the function of who/whom in a subordinate clause depends upon the function of the pronoun in the clause itself.

  • Explanation: The subordinating clause: whom I read about in the tabloidsThe function of the relative pronoun “whom” in the clause is the object of the prepositional phrase about whom. It answers the question I read what?


Pronouns

Name That Pronoun

  • Rules: Each team will be asked a question and given time to consult with teammates. One person will speak for the group. If the team answers incorrectly then the opposing teams will have a chance to steal if able to explain why the answer was wrong.

  • If a team answers correctly the first time, they will get an extra bonus point if able to explain the answer. If not, the other teams will have a chance to explain and will receive an extra point if correct.


Pronoun case2

Pronoun Case

  • What are the cases of the pronouns in bold?

  • I am too bold; tis’ not to meshe speaks. Two of the fairest stars in all the heaven, Having some business, do entreat her eyes to twinkle in their spheres till they return” (II.2. 13-16)—Romeo and Juliet, William Shakespeare.

  • Answer: I=Nominative (completes action am-- “to be”)

  • Me=Objective (obj. of action speaks)

  • She=Nominative (completes action speaks)


Pronouns

  • What are the cases of the pronouns in bold?

  • Iam too bold; tis’ not to me she speaks. Two of the fairest stars in all the heaven, Having some business, do entreat her eyes to twinkle in their spheres till they return” (II.2. 13-16)—Romeo and Juliet, William Shakespeare.

  • Her=Possessive

  • Their=Possessive

  • They=Nominative (subj. completing action return)


Pronouns

  • What are the cases?

  • “He holds him with his skinny hand, ‘There was a ship,’ quothhe.

  • ‘Hold off! Unhand me, graybeard loon!’ Eftsoons his hand dropped he” (9-12).— “Rime of the Ancient Mariner,” Samuel Taylor Coleridge.

  • He=Nominative (completes action: holds)

  • Him=Objective (receiver of action: holds)

  • He=N( completes action: quoth-- “speak”).


Pronouns

  • What are the cases?

  • “He holds him with his skinny hand, ‘There was a ship,’ quoth he.

  • ‘Hold off! Unhand me, graybeard loon!’ Eftsoonshis hand dropped he” (9-12).—”Rime of the Ancient Mariner,” Samuel Taylor Coleridge.

  • Me=Objective (receiver of action: unhand

  • His=Possessive

  • He=Nominative (completes action: dropped)


Pronoun number agreement

Pronoun Number Agreement

  • What is wrong in this sentence?

  • Do readers of The Choice think that independent study is a viable degree option? Would you be interested in earning a degree in a self-designed major? Should every student design their own curriculum? Tell us in the comment box below.

  • Answer: Every studentsingular. Needs singular pronoun or needs to reword. Ex: “Should all students design his or her own curriculum?”

Source: New York Times


Pronouns

  • Is this sentence correct?

  • The crowd went wild as it watched the game.

  • Answer: Yes

  • Explanation?

  • When a collective noun completes the same action simultaneously, it is considered a singular unit that requires a singular pronoun.


Pronouns

  • Is this correct?

  • Some of the lollipops fell out of its bag.

  • Answer: No

  • Explanation: Some is an indefinite pronoun that falls under the category of indefinite pronouns that may either be singular or plural. In this case, some is modified by the prepositional phrase: of the lollipops, and the antecedent lollipops can be counted individually, thereby is plural. The pronoun must agree with its antecedent so the plural pronoun their would be correct.


Pronouns

  • Is this correct?

  • Some of the flour escaped from its bag.

  • Answer: Yes

  • Explanation: Some is modified by the prepositional phrase: of the flour.In this case, the antecedent flour cannot be counted individually, thereby is singular. The pronoun must agree with its antecedent so the singular pronoun its would be correct.


Who versus whom1

Who versus Whom

  • Is this correct?

  • If “Beautiful Thing” were to be made into a film, Shetty would be played by whomever is the current Bollywood equivalent of Paul Giamatti.

  • Answer: No

  • Explanation: Relative pronoun functions as the subject in the subordinating clause: is the current Bollywood equivalent of Paul Giamattiwhoever is the right answer

Source: The New Times


Pronouns

  • Jennifer Lawrence sent a thank you card to whoever/whomever broke her fall on the red carpet.

  • Answer: whoever

  • Explanation: relative pronoun functions as the subject in the subordinate clause: whoever broke her fall on the red carpet. Nominative whoever


Pronouns

  • Is this correct?

  • When it was time for the school play, the teacher asked the students whom she believed to be the most reliable and talented to audition.

  • Answer: Yes

  • Explanation: Whom is the object of the verb “believed” in the subordinate clause: whom she believed to be the most reliable and talented.

Source: http://www.k12reader.com/relative-pronouns/


Pronouns

  • Why is who correct in this passage?

  • “ I reapproached the wall; I replied to the yells of him who clamored. I reechoed—I aided—I surpassed them in volume and in strength” (“The Cask of Amontillado,” Edgar Allan Poe).

  • Who completes the action: clamored


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