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Implicit theories of giftedness. Jana Marie Havigerová & Eda Haviger Faculty of Education University of Hradec Kralove. Implicit theories of giftedness. L et‘s try to start with a little experiment …. … prepare your pen and paper . Implicit theories of giftedness.

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Implicit theories of giftedness

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Implicittheories

ofgiftedness

Jana Marie Havigerová

& Eda Haviger

FacultyofEducation

University of Hradec Kralove


Implicittheoriesofgiftedness

Let‘s try to start with a littleexperiment…

…prepareyourpen and paper.


Implicittheoriesofgiftedness

  • Takea comfortableposition,

  • try not to think about anything…

  • When you are completely calm,

  • try to imagine

  • a g i f t e d c h i l d

  • and describeyourimagination

  • (use yourownwords,

  • describeallthedetails)


Implicittheoriesofgiftedness

  • Thiswas

  • a demonstration how lessons on giftedness startatour university

  • first instruction ofthe researchoftheimplicittheoriesofgiftedness

Reseachissupportedby Czech Science Foundation GAČR, projectGAP407/11/0426

Readyto ask? Informationbehaviourofpre-literategiftedchildren


Implicittheoriesofgiftedness

STUDY I: Researchresults

Thesameassociation experiment was done withdaily and distance studentsofkindergartenteaching.

N = 58

Age = 22 – 53 years

Lengthofprofessionalexperience = 1 – 33 years

Gender = female


Implicittheoriesofgiftedness

What genderisthechild in your mind?


Implicittheoriesofgiftedness

Didyouseea specific or any child?


Implicittheoriesofgiftedness

Did you see a specific child or someone like this?

  • Historicalfigureistypicallyoneofthese two:


Implicittheoriesofgiftedness

In what situationwasyour child?


Implicittheoriesofgiftedness

Whatcharacteristicsare in descriptionof yourchild?


Implicittheoriesofgiftedness

Whatisthemaincharacteristicofthatchild?


Implicittheoriesofgiftedness

Typology

  • Studentsofkindergartenteachingassociate on ofthefivetypes:

    • Smartie

    • Chatterboxie

    • Bob theBuilder

    • Dreamer

    • Childwithspecial talent

      • Littleartist

      • Little sportsman


Implicittheoriesofgiftedness

TypeSmartie

  • bright child

  • looksat the first impression as "intelligent”

  • searchingfor information

  • interestedin thingsaround

  • quicklyfindscontexts

  • quickly understandsthe essence of things


Implicittheoriesofgiftedness

TypeChatterboxie

  • very goodspeaker

  • knows a lot ofwords

  • is communicative

  • talkative

  • inquisitive(Pepping Tom)

  • alwaysasks a number of questions


Implicittheoriesofgiftedness

TypeBob theBuilder

  • smartkid

  • handy, manualskilled

  • concentrated (especiallyin manual activities)

  • original (invents new opportunities to work with objects)


Implicittheoriesofgiftedness

TypeDreamer

a verycreativechild

with original ideas, visions and thoughts

sensitive, empathic

intuitivechild

living in a dream


Implicittheoriesofgiftedness

TypeLittleartistor sportsman

withspecial talent

for

SPORTS

or

ARTS


Implicittheoriesofgiftedness

6. Howwell do you know how to work with such a child?


Implicittheoriesofgiftedness

The guiding idea ofimaginationis based on experiencewith a particulargiftedchild (ifitis) or on verywellknownhistorical or film characters (Mozart, Einstein, Rainman)

More frequentlyisgiftedchildimaginated as a boythan as a girl

Most frequentlyisgiftedchildimaginatedatschool, lessathome

Gifted children are often described using mental functions(especiallythinking)

The main characteristics of gifted children is typicallyattributed to inquiring (interested in things and askingquestionsaboutthem)

Teachers are not surehow to workwithgiftedchildren

Summarising: kindergartenteachersimplicittheoriesofgiftedness


Implicittheoriesofgiftedness

  • Whatisgood:

    • Teachershave usefulideas about gifted children

    • Most ofassociations and ideascorresponds to the current knowledge of the giftedness

Conclusion: kindergartenteachersimplicittheoriesofgiftedness

  • Whatiswrong:

    • Implicitconcepts of gifted children are incomplete

    • Teachers don´t knowhowto identify a giftedchild

    • Teachers don´t knowwhat to do withthem


Implicittheoriesofgiftedness

  • In my work I do

  • uncover implicit theories of giftednessof kindergartenteachers,

  • show currentknowledge of the giftedness,

  • teach how to work with talented children,

    • especiallyhow to askgoodquestions,

    • and how to teachaskinggoodquestion,

  • and subtlyaffectstudent‘simplicit theories of giftednessinto explicit objectiverealisticone

Conclusion: whatam I doingfor?


Implicittheoriesofgiftedness

Study II. CharacteristicofGiftednessScaleforkindergartenteachers


Implicittheoriesofgiftedness

  • Isthisscalegoodtoolforkindergartenteachers to giftednomination?

Purpose

Method

  • Correlation study

  • CharacteristicofGiftednessScale * WISC

  • N=55 preschoolchildren


Implicittheoriesofgiftedness

Results

Conclusion

  • CharacteristicofGiftednessScaleisusefultoolforkindergartenteachers


Implicittheoriesofgiftedness

Do youhaveanyquestionsformenow?


Implicittheoriesofgiftedness

Do youhavequestions?

Do youwantcooperate?

Pleasecontactme:

[email protected]

Thankyou

and have a nice day in Prague


Implicittheoriesofgiftedness

Appendix I.Whatisitgoodfor?


Implicittheoriesofgiftedness

  • Word implicit is derived from the latinimplico(to braid).

  • Implicittheories are subjective, tacit, lay, unexpressed, unspokentheoriesinsighthuman mind. Weusuallydon‘tknowaboutthem, but theysubtlyaffectus!

  • Implicittheories are subtly influencing:

  • attention

  • memory

  • emotions

  • interpretation of facts

  • and behavior.

Conclusion: kindergartenteachersimplicittheoriesofgiftedness


Implicittheoriesofgiftedness

  • Implicit theories of giftednesscan affect a number of educational processes and activities of teachers

  • searchingand nominating gifted children,

  • educational leadership identified gifted children,

  • working with a problematic talented child or a child with dual exceptionality.

Conclusion: kindergartenteachersimplicittheoriesofgiftedness


Implicittheoriesofgiftedness

  • Implicit theories of giftednesscan also affect the willingness of teachers to

  • work on themselves,

  • get new information about giftednessand giftedchildren,

  • learn new methods and procedures,

  • be a good teacher for these children.

Conclusion: kindergartenteachersimplicittheoriesofgiftedness


Implicittheoriesofgiftedness

For the practical needs, rather than sophisticated theoretical definition of giftedness or gifted child, it is important to have a good description of the child or group of children I workwith, informationaboutspecial needs of that children, and to knowhow towork withthem.


Implicittheoriesofgiftedness

APPENDIX II.

Somethingpracticalbeforethe end…


Implicittheoriesofgiftedness

Activatechildren to ask questions

  • Play question games with children

    • 20 question task (What do I think about?)

    • Neverending story (6 times why?)

    • Interviewer Cornell notes (interrogative pronouns)

    • Bloom‘s daisy

    • Brainstorming game (What else?)

    • What would be if?

  • Encourage children to ask questions

  • Praise children when they ask


Implicittheoriesofgiftedness

Be a good model foryourchildren

  • Teachersasking top ten

  • Ask questions of different levels - see Bloom's daisy

  • Ask open questions, rather than closed

  • Ask open-ended questions

  • Ask questions thatsupport divergent thinking

  • Never besettledwith just one answer!

  • Ask questions generally the whole class

  • Allow the interviewee time to answer

  • Ask clear questions

  • Askonly one questionatone moment

  • Do not answer your own questions


Implicittheoriesofgiftedness

So do I


Academictheoriesofgiftedness

APPENDIX III.Whatisgiftedness?Whoisgiftedone?

…somedefinitionsfor study…


Academictheoriesofgiftedness

LewisMadisonTERMAN(1877-1956)

Whatisgiftedness? Whoisgifted?

1925 giftedchild = child earning score greater than 120/130 on intelligence tests

1959 but - parental socioeconomic status and academic performance predictedfuture success better than IQ

test scores


Academictheoriesofgiftedness

Robert James HAVIGHURST(1900-1991)

Whatisgiftedness? Whoisgifted?

1925 giftedchild

= givesconsistently remarkable acheivementsin any domain of human performance or endeavor

- his ability can make him an outstanding contributor to the welfare of, and quality of living in society

Robert FrankDeHAAN(1925- )


Academictheoriesofgiftedness

Ellis Paul TORRANCE(1915-2003)

Whatisgiftedness? Whoisgifted?

  • 1974 giftedchild

    • = one who could identify problems or gaps in extending knowledge domains, generate new ideas or hypotheses, assess the ideas, and modify hypotheses andcommunicate results effectively


Academictheoriesofgiftedness

Joseph S. RENZULLI (1936 - )

Whatisgiftedness? Whoisgifted?

1978 giftedchildgiftedbehaviour

= childproducedgiftedbehavior thatreflects an interaction among three basic clusters of human traits: above-average abilities, high levels of task commitment (motivation), and high levels of creativity.

= and isapplying them to any potentially valuable area of human performance


Academictheoriesofgiftedness

Robert Jeffrey STERNBERG (1949 - )

Whatisgiftedness? Whoisgifted?

1986 giftedness= is a kind of mental self-managementof one's life in a constructive, purposeful way. It has three basic elements: adapting to environments, selecting new environments, and shaping environments.

Intellectualgiftednessincludesthree main processes:

separating relevant from irrelevant information,

combining isolated pieces of information into a unified whole,

relating newly acquired information to information acquired in the past


Academictheoriesofgiftedness

Nationaldefinitionof US (1993)

Whatisgiftedness? Whoisgifted?

1986 giftedchild

= children and youth with outstanding talent perform or show the potential for performing at remarkably high levels of accomplishment when compared with others of their age, experience, or environment. These children and youth exhibit high performance capability in intellectual, creativity, and/or artistic areas, possess an unusual leadership capacity, or excel in specific academic fields.

They requireservices or activities not ordinarily provided by the schools.


Academictheoriesofgiftedness

Conclusion(2011)

Whatisgiftedness? Whoisgifted?

For the practical needs, rather than sophisticated theoretical definition of giftedness or gifted child, it is important to have a good description of the child or group of children and ofthespecial needs of that children, which we work with.


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