Graphs
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 34

Graphs PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 84 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Graphs. Chapter 29. Some Examples and Terminology Road Maps Airline Routes Mazes Course Prerequisites Trees Traversals Breadth-First Traversal Dept-First Traversal. Topological Order Paths Finding a Path Shortest Path in an Unweighted Graph Shortest Pat in a Weighted Graph

Download Presentation

Graphs

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Graphs

Graphs

Chapter 29


Chapter contents

Some Examples and Terminology

Road Maps

Airline Routes

Mazes

Course Prerequisites

Trees

Traversals

Breadth-First Traversal

Dept-First Traversal

Topological Order

Paths

Finding a Path

Shortest Path in an Unweighted Graph

Shortest Pat in a Weighted Graph

Java Interfaces for the ADT Graph

Chapter Contents


Some examples and terminology

Some Examples and Terminology

  • Vertices or nodes are connected by edges

  • A graph is a collection of distinct vertices and distinct edges

    • Edges can be directed or undirected

    • When it has directed edges it is called a digraph

  • A subgraph is a portion of a graph that itself is a graph


Road maps

Road Maps

Nodes

Edges

Fig. 29-1 A portion of a road map.


Road maps1

Road Maps

Fig. 29-2 A directed graph representing a portion of a city's street map.


Paths

Paths

  • A sequence of edges that connect two vertices in a graph

  • In a directed graph the direction of the edges must be considered

    • Called a directed path

  • A cycle is a path that begins and ends at same vertex

    • Simple path does not pass through any vertex more than once

  • A graph with no cycles is acyclic


Weights

Weights

  • A weighted graph has values on its edges

    • Weights or costs

  • A path in a weighted graph also has weight or cost

    • The sum of the edge weights

  • Examples of weights

    • Miles between nodes on a map

    • Driving time between nodes

    • Taxi cost between node locations


Weights1

Weights

Fig. 29-3 A weighted graph.


Connected graphs

Connected Graphs

  • A connected graph

    • Has a path between every pair of distinct vertices

  • A complete graph

    • Has an edge between every pair of distinct vertices

  • A disconnected graph

    • Not connected


Connected graphs1

Connected Graphs

Fig. 29-4 Undirected graphs


Adjacent vertices

Adjacent Vertices

  • Two vertices are adjacent in an undirected graph if they are joined by an edge

  • Sometimes adjacent vertices are called neighbors

Fig. 29-5 Vertex A is adjacent to B, but B is not adjacent to A.


Airline routes

Airline Routes

  • Note the graph with two subgraphs

    • Each subgraph connected

    • Entire graph disconnected

Fig. 29-6 Airline routes


Mazes

Mazes

Fig. 29-7 (a) A maze; (b) its representation as a graph


Course prerequisites

Course Prerequisites

Fig. 29-8 The prerequisite structure for a selection of courses as a directed graph without cycles.


Trees

Trees

  • All trees are graphs

    • But not all graphs are trees

  • A tree is a connected graph without cycles

  • Traversals

    • Preorder, inorder, postorder traversals are examples of depth-first traversal

    • Level-order traversal of a tree is an example of breadth-first traversal

  • Visit a node

    • For a tree: process the node's data

    • For a graph: mark the node as visited


Trees1

Trees

Fig. 29-9 The visitation order of two traversals; (a) depth first; (b) breadth first.


Breadth first traversal

Breadth-First Traversal

  • Algorithm for breadth-first traversal of nonempty graph beginning at a given vertex

Algorithm getBreadthFirstTraversal(originVertex)vertexQueue = a new queue to hold neighborstraversalOrder = a new queue for the resulting traversal orderMark originVertex as visitedtraversalOrder.enqueue(originVertex)vertexQueue.enqueue(originVertex)while (!vertexQueue.isEmpty()){frontVertex = vertexQueue.dequeue()while (frontVertex has an unvisited neighbor){nextNeighbor = next unvisited neighbor of frontVertexMark nextNeighbor as visitedtraversalOrder.enqueue(nextNeighbor)vertexQueue.enqueue(nextNeighbor)}}return traversalOrder

A breadth-first traversal visits a vertex and then each of the vertex's neighbors before advancing


Breadth first traversal1

Breadth-First Traversal

Fig. 29-10 (ctd.) A trace of a breadth-first traversal for a directed graph, beginning at vertex A.


Depth first traversal

Depth-First Traversal

  • Visits a vertex, then

    • A neighbor of the vertex,

    • A neighbor of the neighbor,

    • Etc.

  • Advance as possible from the original vertex

  • Then back up by one vertex

    • Considers the next neighbor


Depth first traversal1

Depth-First Traversal

Fig. 29-11 A trace of a depth-first traversal beginning at vertex A of the directed graph in Fig. 29-10a.


Topological order

Topological Order

  • Given a directed graph without cycles

  • In a topological order

    • Vertex a precedes vertex b whenever

    • A directed edge exists from a to b


Topological order1

Topological Order

Fig. 29-12 Three topological orders for the graph of Fig. 29-8.


Topological order2

Topological Order

Fig. 29-13 An impossible prerequisite structure for three courses as a directed graph with a cycle.


Topological order3

Topological Order

  • Algorithm for a topological sort

Algorithm getTopologicalSort()vertexStack = a new stack to hold vertices as they are visitedn = number of vertices in the graphfor (counter = 1 to n){nextVertex = an unvisited vertex whose neighbors, if any, are all visitedMark nextVertex as visitedstack.push(nextVertex)}return stack


Topological order4

Topological Order

Fig. 29-14 Finding a topological order for the graph in Fig. 29-8.


Shortest path in an unweighted graph

Shortest Path in an Unweighted Graph

Fig. 29-15 (a) an unweighted graph and (b) the possible paths from vertex A to vertex H.


Shortest path in an unweighted graph1

Shortest Path in an Unweighted Graph

Fig. 29-16 The graph in 29-15a after the shortest-path algorithm has traversed from vertex A to vertex H


Shortest path in an unweighted graph2

Shortest Path in an Unweighted Graph

Fig. 29-17 Finding the shortest path from vertex A to vertex H in the unweighted graph in Fig. 29-15a.


Shortest path in an weighted graph

Shortest Path in an Weighted Graph

Fig. 29-18 (a) A weighted graph and (b) the possible paths from vertex A to vertex H.


Shortest path in an weighted graph1

Shortest Path in an Weighted Graph

  • Shortest path between two given vertices

    • Smallest edge-weight sum

  • Algorithm based on breadth-first traversal

  • Several paths in a weighted graph might have same minimum edge-weight sum

    • Algorithm given by text finds only one of these paths


Shortest path in an weighted graph2

Shortest Path in an Weighted Graph

Fig. 29-19 Finding the cheapest path from vertex A to vertex H in the weighted graph in Fig 29-18a.


Shortest path in an weighted graph3

Shortest Path in an Weighted Graph

Fig. 29-20 The graph in Fig. 29-18a after finding the cheapest path from vertex A to vertex H.


Java interfaces for the adt graph

Java Interfaces for the ADT Graph

  • Methods in the BasicGraphInterface

    • addVertex

    • addEdge

    • hasEdge

    • isEmpty

    • getNumberOfVertices

    • getNumberOfEdges

    • clear


Java interfaces for the adt graph1

Java Interfaces for the ADT Graph

Operations of the ADT graph enable creation of a graph and answer questions based on relationships among vertices

Fig. 29-21 A portion of the flight map in Fig. 29-6.


  • Login