Renaissance urbanism in the 15 th and 16 th centuries l.jpg
Sponsored Links
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
1 / 13

Renaissance Urbanism in the 15 th and 16 th centuries PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 250 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Renaissance Urbanism in the 15 th and 16 th centuries. Under Pope Nicholas V (1397-1455). Rome c. 1450. Planning under Pope Julius II (1503-1513). Banchi was redeveloped and de-congested A bold new design for St. Peter’s and redevelopment of the Vatican (Bramante was the architect)

Download Presentation

Renaissance Urbanism in the 15 th and 16 th centuries

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Renaissance Urbanismin the 15th and 16th centuries


Under Pope Nicholas V (1397-1455)

Rome c. 1450


Planning under Pope Julius II (1503-1513)

  • Banchi was redeveloped and de-congested

  • A bold new design for St. Peter’s and redevelopment of the Vatican (Bramante was the architect)

  • Proposal for a new, straight street: Via Giulia, running north and south

  • Another parallel street, Via della Lungara, would connect Borgo with Trastevere

  • The Palace of Justice along Via Giulia

  • Shows papal attempt to assert its authority through a grand urban scheme


St. Peter’s and the Borgo


Urban Planning under Pope Leo X (1513-1521)


Piazza del Popolo


The Capitol, Washington, DC


The Master Plan of Pope Sixtus V

(1585-1590)

  • The most ambitious papal urban project

  • Domenico Fontana was employed as the architect

  • Sixtus abandoned the piecemeal approach of his predecessors

  • Entire city and its periphery was brought under one master plan marked by broad and axial avenues connecting the edge of the core and vast expanse of the east

  • The avenues connected two points of interest


Seven principal churches

St. Peter’s

St. John of the Lateran

S. Croce

S. Agnese

S. Lorenzo

St. Paul’s

S. Maria Maggiore


  • Login