resolutions position papers parliamentary procedure
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
Resolutions, Position Papers, & Parliamentary Procedure

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 13

Resolutions, Position Papers, & Parliamentary Procedure - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 58 Views
  • Uploaded on

Resolutions, Position Papers, & Parliamentary Procedure. What is a resolution?. United Nations resolutions are formal expressions of the opinion or will of United Nations organs. They generally consist of two clearly defined sections: a preamble and an operative part. Preambulatory Clauses.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about ' Resolutions, Position Papers, & Parliamentary Procedure' - murray


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
what is a resolution
What is a resolution?
  • United Nations resolutions are formal expressions of the opinion or will of United Nations organs. They generally consist of two clearly defined sections: a preamble and an operative part
preambulatory clauses
Preambulatory Clauses
  • The preamble of a draft resolution states the reasons for which the committee is addressing the topic and highlights past international action on the issue.
  • Each clause begins with a present participle (called a preambulatory phrase) and ends with a comma.
  • Preambulatory clauses can include:
    • References to the UN Charter;
    • Citations of past UN resolutions or treaties on the topic under discussion;
    • Mentions of statements made by the Secretary-General or a relevant UN body or agency;
    • Recognition of the efforts of regional or nongovernmental organizations in dealing with the issue; and
    • General statements on the topic, its significance and its impact.
examples of preambulatory clauses
Examples of Preambulatory Clauses
  • Affirming
  • Alarmed by
  • Approving
  • Aware of
  • Bearing in mind
  • Believing
  • Confident
  • Contemplating
  • Convinced
  • Declaring
  • Deeply concerned
  • Deeply conscious
  • Deeply convinced 
  • Deeply disturbed
  • Deeply regretting
  • Desiring
  • Emphasizing
  • Expecting
  • Expressing its appreciation
  • Expressing its satisfaction
  • Fulfilling
  • Fully alarmed
  • Fully aware
  • Fully believing
  • Further deploring
  • Further recalling
  • Guided by
  • Having adopted
  • Having considered
  • Having considered further
  • Having devoted attention
  • Having examined
  • Having heard
  • Having received
  • Having studied
  • Keeping in mind
  • Noting with regret
  • Noting with deep concern
  • Noting with satisfaction
  • Noting further 
  • Noting with approval
  • Observing
  • Reaffirming
  • Realizing
  • Recalling
  • Recognizing
  • Referring
  • Seeking
  • Taking into account
  • Taking into consideration
  • Taking note
  • Viewing with appreciationWelcoming
example of preamble
Example of Preamble
  • The General Assembly,
  • Reminding all nations of the celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which recognizes the inherent dignity, equality and inalienable rights of all global citizens, [use commas to separate preambulatory clauses]
  • Reaffirming its Resolution 33/1996 of 25 July 1996, which encourages Governments to work with UN bodies aimed at improving the coordination and effectiveness of humanitarian assistance,
  • Noting with satisfaction the past efforts of various relevant UN bodies and nongovernmental organizations,
  • Stressing the fact that the United Nations faces significant financial obstacles and is in need of reform, particularly in the humanitarian realm,
operative clauses
Operative Clauses
  • Operative clauses identify the actions or recommendations made in a resolution.
  • Each operative clause begins with a verb (called an operative phrase) and ends with a semicolon.
  • Operative clauses should be organized in a logical progression, with each containing a single idea or proposal, and are always numbered.
  • If a clause requires further explanation, bulleted lists set off by letters or roman numerals can also be used.
  • After the last operative clause, the resolution ends in a period.
examples of operative clauses
Examples of Operative Clauses
  • Accepts
  • Affirms
  • Approves
  • Authorizes
  • Calls
  • Calls upon
  • Condemns
  • Confirms
  • Congratulates
  • Considers
  • Declares accordingly
  • Deplores
  • Designates
  • Draws the attention
  • Emphasizes
  • Encourages
  • Endorses
  • Expresses its appreciation
  • Expresses its hope
  • Further invites
  • Deplores
  • Designates
  • Draws the attention
  • Emphasizes
  • Encourages
  • Endorses
  • Expresses its
  • Appreciation
  • Expresses its hope
  • Further invites
  • Further proclaims
  • Further
  • Reminds
  • Further recommends
  • Further requests
  • Further resolves
  • Has resolved
  • Notes
  • Proclaims
  • Reaffirms
  • Recommends
  • Regrets
  • Reminds
  • Requests
  • Solemnly affirms
  • Strongly condemns
  • Supports
  • Takes note of
  • Transmits
  • Trusts
example of operative part
Example of Operative Part
  • 1. Encourages all relevant agencies of the United Nations to collaborate more closely with countries at the grassroots level to enhance the carrying out of relief efforts; [use semicolons to separate operative clauses]
  • 2. Urges member states to comply with the goals of the UN Department of Humanitarian Affairs to streamline efforts of humanitarian aid;
  • 3. Requests that all nations develop rapid deployment forces to better enhance the coordination of relief efforts of humanitarian assistance in complex emergencies;
  • 4. Calls for the development of a United Nations Trust Fund that encourages voluntary donations from the private transnational sector to aid in funding the implementation of rapid deployment forces;
  • 5. Stresses the continuing need for impartial and objective information on the political, economic and social situations and events of all countries;
  • 6. Calls upon states to respond quickly and generously to consolidated appeals for humanitarian assistance; and
  • 7. Requests the expansion of preventive actions and assurance of post-conflict assistance through reconstruction and development. [end resolutions with a period]
sponsors and signitories
Sponsors and Signitories
  • Sponsors of a draft resolution are the principal authors of the document and agree with its substance. Although it is possible to have only one sponsor, this rarely occurs at the UN, since countries must work together to create widely agreeable language in order for the draft resolution to pass. Sponsors control a draft resolution and only the sponsors can approve immediate changes.
  • Signatories are countries that may or may not agree with the substance of the draft resolution but still wish to see it debated so that they can propose amendments.
    • A certain percentage of the committee must be either sponsors or signatories to a draft resolution in order for it to be accepted.
friendly and unfriendly amendments
Friendly and Unfriendly Amendments
  • Approved draft resolutions are modified through amendments. An amendment is a written statement that adds, deletes or revises an operative clause in a draft resolution. The amendment process is used to strengthen consensus on a resolution by allowing delegates to change certain sections. There are two types of amendments:
  • A friendly amendment is a change to the draft resolution that all sponsors agree with. After the amendment is signed by all of the draft resolution’s sponsors and approved by the committee director or president, it will be automatically incorporated into the resolution.
  • An unfriendly amendment is a change that some or all of the draft resolution’s sponsors do not support and must be voted upon by the committee. The author(s) of the amendment will need to obtain a required number of signatories in order to introduce it (usually 20 percent of the committee). Prior to voting on the draft resolution, the committee votes on all unfriendly amendments.
  • Ultimately, resolutions passed by a committee represent a great deal of debate and compromise. They are the tangible results of hours if not days of Model UN debate. As a result, it is important to become familiar with the resolution process and practice drafting resolutions using the proper structure and wording.
sample resolution
Sample Resolution

Resolution GA/3/1.1

General Assembly Third Committee

Sponsors: United States, Austria and Italy

Signatories: Greece, Tajikistan, Japan, Canada, Mali, the Netherlands and Gabon

Topic: “Strengthening UN coordination of humanitarian assistance in complex emergencies”

The General Assembly,

Reminding all nations of the celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which recognizes the inherent dignity,

equality and inalienable rights of all global citizens, [use commas to separate preambulatory clauses]

Reaffirming its Resolution 33/1996 of 25 July 1996, which encourages Governments to work with UN bodies aimed at improving the coordination and

effectiveness of humanitarian assistance,

Noting with satisfaction the past efforts of various relevant UN bodies and nongovernmental organizations,

Stressing the fact that the United Nations faces significant financial obstacles and is in need of reform, particularly in the humanitarian realm,

1. Encourages all relevant agencies of the United Nations to collaborate more closely with countries at the grassroots level to enhance the carrying out

of relief efforts; [use semicolons to separate operative clauses]

2. Urges member states to comply with the goals of the UN Department of Humanitarian Affairs to streamline efforts of humanitarian aid;

3. Requests that all nations develop rapid deployment forces to better enhance the coordination of relief efforts of humanitarian assistance in complex

emergencies;

4. Calls for the development of a United Nations Trust Fund that encourages voluntary donations from the private transnational sector to aid in funding

the implementation of rapid deployment forces;

5. Stresses the continuing need for impartial and objective information on the political, economic and social situations and events of all countries;

6. Calls upon states to respond quickly and generously to consolidated appeals for humanitarian assistance; and

7. Requests the expansion of preventive actions and assurance of post-conflict assistance through reconstruction and development. [end resolutions

with a period]

parliamentary procedure
Parliamentary Procedure
  • Point of Order: This point may be raised when you feel that a delegate or the Chair is not abiding by correct parliamentary procedure (as laid out for the conference). A point of order is allowed to interrupt the speaker.
  • Point of Personal Privilege: This point is used to indicate personal discomforts or impediments to debate. It may be raised during the debate if, for example, you cannot hear the speaker or feel uncomfortably hot or cold. This point is allowed to interrupt a speaker, but may not refer to the content of any speech or working paper.
  • Point of Inquiry: This point may be raised after a speaker yields to questions. It is used to ask a question of the speaker relating to the speech just given. It may also be used to ask the chair a questions regarding parliamentary procedure during a normal session.
  • Motion to Open Debate: This is the first motion of the conference and is made to move into formal debate and open the primary speakers list. If there are multiple topics on the agenda, the body will first debate on the order they are to be discussed until there is a motion to set the agenda. All delegates wishing to be added to the speakers list should raise their placards at the request of the chair or send a note to the dais. Speaking time during debate may be limited with a Motion to Limit Debate (see below).
  • Motion to Set the Agenda: This motion is made with a specific topic mentioned to be debated first and the other second. Two speakers for, two against, and requires a simple majority to pass.
  • Motion to Adjourn the Session: This motion adjourns the committee sessions for good. It will only be entertained by the chair at the end of the last committee session. This motion requires a second, is not debatable, and needs a simple majority to pass.
  • Motion to Suspend the Meeting: This motion suspends the body between sessions. This motion requires a second, is not debatable, and needs a simple majority to pass.
  • Motion to Enter Unmoderated Caucus: This motion temporarily suspends the meeting for a specified amount of time. Use it to create resolutions, talk to other delegates, or anything else you may need to do. It requires a second, is not debatable, and needs a simple majority to pass.
parliamentary procedure continued
Parliamentary Procedure Continued
  • Motion to Enter Moderated Caucus: This motion brings the body into a moderated debate on the issue on the floor for a specified amount of time. The moderating officer will then recognize speakers for a specified amount of time, who cannot yield to anyone but the Chair at the end of their speech. This motion requires a second, is not debatable, and needs a simple majority to pass. This motion may not be made once debate has been closed.
  • Motion to Table the Topic: This motion tables a topic (ending debate on the topic) until it is reopened with a Motion to Reconsider. This motion requires a second, is debatable (two speeches in favor and two against), and needs a two-thirds majority to pass.
  • Motion to Divide the Question: This motion may be made to request that the resolution be divided in a manner specified by the motioner (it can be by every other letter, by prime numbers, or even by every ten words). These clauses will then be voted on individually. This motion requires a second, is debatable (2 speeches pro/2 con), and needs a simple majority to pass. If the motion passes, the body then votes on the operative clauses as they were divided out. If an operative clause fails to receive a majority vote, it is left out of the resolution.
  • Motion for a Roll Call Vote: This motion requests that the Chair conduct a roll-call vote on the resolution. This motion only requires a second to be accepted.
  • Motion to Adopt by Consensus: This motion requests that the body adopt the resolution by consensus, meaning that no delegation would be casting a “no” vote if the resolution were to be voted upon normally. A delegation may abstain, but should one delegation object, the motion is out of order.
  • Motion to Appeal the Decision of the Chair: This motion appeals a decision of the Chair to the body. This motion requires the consent of the Chair and may be deemed out of order. If accepted by the Chair, the Chair and the Delegate shall each be given one minute to present their argument to the body. This motion needs a simple majority to pass. If passed, the decision of the Chair is repealed.
  • Motion to Introduce an Unfriendly Amendment: This motion brings an amendment that has already been submitted to the Chair with the appropriate number of signatories to the floor for general debate and a vote when debate is closed on the resolution. No second is required. It is only for unfriendly amendments, for friendly amendments are just considered automatically part of the resolution.
  • Motion to Introduce a Working Paper: This motion brings a working paper that has already been approved by the Chair with the appropriate number of signatories to the floor for general debate. It requires a second, is not debatable, and needs a simple majority to pass.
  • Motion to Limit Debate: This motion sets the amount of time a delegate has the floor during normal debate (excluding moderated caucuses). It may also be used to change the set speaking time.
  • Motion to Reconsider: This motion is used to bring a resolution or topic that has been previously tabled back to the floor. It requires two speakers in favor and two against and needs a two-thirds majority to pass.
ad