Why study science and maths

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Why study science and maths? Keep your options open. Science and maths:Provide an excellent foundationEnable you to study science or other subjects furtherMaximise career options in science but also far beyond.... Why study science and maths? Become someone. Increase your chances of future empl

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Why study science and maths

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1. Why study science and maths? This presentation is designed to be adapted for your own purpose. You may want to use only a selection of the slides, or to re-order those that are here. Depending on what your school or college offers, you may wish to re-write or edit the courses section (slides 19-26) to suit your requirements. We have added suggested notes with each slide to help during presentation. Again, you may prefer to adapt these, according to your needs and exploring the Future Morph website may give you ideas to include: www.futuremorph.orgThis presentation is designed to be adapted for your own purpose. You may want to use only a selection of the slides, or to re-order those that are here. Depending on what your school or college offers, you may wish to re-write or edit the courses section (slides 19-26) to suit your requirements. We have added suggested notes with each slide to help during presentation. Again, you may prefer to adapt these, according to your needs and exploring the Future Morph website may give you ideas to include: www.futuremorph.org

2. Why study science and maths? Keep your options open Science and maths: Provide an excellent foundation Enable you to study science or other subjects further Maximise career options in science but also far beyond... Keep your options open Discuss how versatile science and maths are as subjects. Explain how a good grade in maths is important and relevant to support the study of any science subject. Discuss in terms of options how qualifications in science do not rule out following alternative career paths, in fact they are likely to be beneficial e.g. biology is relevant to being a chef (microbiology, health and safety, digestion etc). For England - Explain how the new curriculum is structured to enable students to progress smoothly from 3-4 GCSEs in science and maths, to studying many different subjects at A level. Explain how studying science and maths broadens job/career options, both in and outside of science e.g. you could study science to degree level and still become a journalist, but you won’t be able to become a nuclear physicist with a degree in creative writing. Keep your options open Discuss how versatile science and maths are as subjects. Explain how a good grade in maths is important and relevant to support the study of any science subject. Discuss in terms of options how qualifications in science do not rule out following alternative career paths, in fact they are likely to be beneficial e.g. biology is relevant to being a chef (microbiology, health and safety, digestion etc). For England - Explain how the new curriculum is structured to enable students to progress smoothly from 3-4 GCSEs in science and maths, to studying many different subjects at A level. Explain how studying science and maths broadens job/career options, both in and outside of science e.g. you could study science to degree level and still become a journalist, but you won’t be able to become a nuclear physicist with a degree in creative writing.

3. Why study science and maths? Become someone Increase your chances of future employment Gain a highly respected and well paid job Become whoever you want to be in your future… Become someone Explain how science and maths are the keys to keeping future career options open, providing flexibility, choice and job security in an ever competitive job market. Explain how further, or higher, education in maths or science could lead to a career in a variety of areas such as business, finance, law, engineering, computer software development, media etc. Discuss how employable those with science and maths qualifications are, especially those with a first degree or higher qualification. Recent research undertaken by Dr Anna Vignoles1 at the Institute of Education, found that a surplus of graduates in some non-scientific subjects could mean that those with degrees in the arts or humanities may soon find that they are not able to earn enough to compensate for the amount that they paid for their university education. “Some graduates in highly valued subjects, such as accountancy, will continue to profit from the amount they spent on their degrees. But others may gain only a small, or even a nil, return to their investment in higher education.” Explain that science and maths could lead to well paid, respected and secure jobs such as dentistry, medicine, teaching and law. You could discuss the research that has shown that achieving further qualifications in science and maths bring greater rewards in monetary terms in future employment when compared to many other subjects. The research carried out by PricewaterhouseCoopers in 20052 showed that engineering, chemistry and physics university graduates earn on average 30% more than those with two ‘A’ levels but no degree. There is wide variation in the value of different degree subjects; for example the combination of enhanced employment and annual earnings suggests that graduates in chemistry and physics earn well above the average, with the overall value for these subjects being around £190,000 more in lifetime earnings than achieved by those with 2 or more ‘A’ levels. Conclude that studying science and maths opens doors, allows flexibility and increases future options, enabling students to follow whichever career path ultimately appeals to them. http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/education/article2403006.ece Evaluating the Impact of Education on Earnings in the UK: Models, Methods and Results from the NCDS. R. Blundell, L. Dearden, B. Sianesi. The Institute for Fiscal Studies WP03/20; 2005.Become someone Explain how science and maths are the keys to keeping future career options open, providing flexibility, choice and job security in an ever competitive job market. Explain how further, or higher, education in maths or science could lead to a career in a variety of areas such as business, finance, law, engineering, computer software development, media etc. Discuss how employable those with science and maths qualifications are, especially those with a first degree or higher qualification. Recent research undertaken by Dr Anna Vignoles1 at the Institute of Education, found that a surplus of graduates in some non-scientific subjects could mean that those with degrees in the arts or humanities may soon find that they are not able to earn enough to compensate for the amount that they paid for their university education. “Some graduates in highly valued subjects, such as accountancy, will continue to profit from the amount they spent on their degrees. But others may gain only a small, or even a nil, return to their investment in higher education.” Explain that science and maths could lead to well paid, respected and secure jobs such as dentistry, medicine, teaching and law. You could discuss the research that has shown that achieving further qualifications in science and maths bring greater rewards in monetary terms in future employment when compared to many other subjects. The research carried out by PricewaterhouseCoopers in 20052 showed that engineering, chemistry and physics university graduates earn on average 30% more than those with two ‘A’ levels but no degree. There is wide variation in the value of different degree subjects; for example the combination of enhanced employment and annual earnings suggests that graduates in chemistry and physics earn well above the average, with the overall value for these subjects being around £190,000 more in lifetime earnings than achieved by those with 2 or more ‘A’ levels. Conclude that studying science and maths opens doors, allows flexibility and increases future options, enabling students to follow whichever career path ultimately appeals to them. http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/education/article2403006.ece Evaluating the Impact of Education on Earnings in the UK: Models, Methods and Results from the NCDS. R. Blundell, L. Dearden, B. Sianesi. The Institute for Fiscal Studies WP03/20; 2005.

4. Why study science and maths? Because Science and maths can help you: Make sense of the world Understand current issues Develop transferable skills you will need throughout life Gain useful knowledge for many different jobs, not just those in science Because Possible discussion point – what does the audience think? Are science and maths important? Why? Discuss examples from each bullet point: Making sense of the world around us e.g. from understanding what a rainbow is, to being able to make sense of a new mobile phone, to looking after our personal health Understanding current issues e.g. from reducing land fill to developing environmentally friendly packaging Developing transferable skills needed throughout life e.g. skills that are highly relevant which can be applied to all aspects of life and work (all jobs/workplaces – not just in science or maths) Gaining knowledge useful in many different jobs that the audience may not have considered e.g. glazier, beauty therapist, photographer, media and film producer, chef etc.Because Possible discussion point – what does the audience think? Are science and maths important? Why? Discuss examples from each bullet point: Making sense of the world around us e.g. from understanding what a rainbow is, to being able to make sense of a new mobile phone, to looking after our personal health Understanding current issues e.g. from reducing land fill to developing environmentally friendly packaging Developing transferable skills needed throughout life e.g. skills that are highly relevant which can be applied to all aspects of life and work (all jobs/workplaces – not just in science or maths) Gaining knowledge useful in many different jobs that the audience may not have considered e.g. glazier, beauty therapist, photographer, media and film producer, chef etc.

5. Why study science and maths? Making sense of the world Making sense of the world Begin a discussion on where/when/how do we come into contact with science, technology, engineering and maths in everyday life? For example – doing some DIY at home, taking medicines for an illness, following a recipe… Here are some possible discussion points for the examples shown: We use mobile phones, computers and MP3 players – How do they work? Are mobile phones safe to use? How much power do they use? How can they be recharged? We read papers and magazines, and see adverts on TV – How do we know if “science” stories are telling the truth? Can we critically assess the news? Adverts often baffle us with pseudo-science and talk of surveys and statistics; how can we make sense of them and be sure their claims are real/accurate? We listen to experts – doctors, dentists, vets, teachers – Would a science knowledge help us understand a diagnosis or prescribed medicines, or help us make decisions about immunisations, for example. Knowledge helps us to understand family and friends’ illnesses and treatments. Would you know what to do in an emergency situation? We make choices about the food we buy and eat – What are the advantages and disadvantages of organic food? What do food labels mean? How do we know which vitamins, minerals, fats, sugars, etc. to eat? We drive cars and travel on trains, buses, boats and planes – What car should you buy, and why? Can you fix a car? What about CO2 emissions – which form of transport is least/most environmentally friendly? We try to manage our finances – What does 15% APR mean? Why consolidate a loan? Credit card or debit card? Fixed rate or tracker? What is the Bank of England base rate? What about when it comes to applying for a mortgage? Other discussion points could include: Choosing products from the supermarket, such as cleaning products – which chemicals are safe to use? Should we worry about bird flu? Can foot and mouth disease affect humans?Making sense of the world Begin a discussion on where/when/how do we come into contact with science, technology, engineering and maths in everyday life? For example – doing some DIY at home, taking medicines for an illness, following a recipe… Here are some possible discussion points for the examples shown: We use mobile phones, computers and MP3 players – How do they work? Are mobile phones safe to use? How much power do they use? How can they be recharged? We read papers and magazines, and see adverts on TV – How do we know if “science” stories are telling the truth? Can we critically assess the news? Adverts often baffle us with pseudo-science and talk of surveys and statistics; how can we make sense of them and be sure their claims are real/accurate? We listen to experts – doctors, dentists, vets, teachers – Would a science knowledge help us understand a diagnosis or prescribed medicines, or help us make decisions about immunisations, for example. Knowledge helps us to understand family and friends’ illnesses and treatments. Would you know what to do in an emergency situation? We make choices about the food we buy and eat – What are the advantages and disadvantages of organic food? What do food labels mean? How do we know which vitamins, minerals, fats, sugars, etc. to eat? We drive cars and travel on trains, buses, boats and planes – What car should you buy, and why? Can you fix a car? What about CO2 emissions – which form of transport is least/most environmentally friendly? We try to manage our finances – What does 15% APR mean? Why consolidate a loan? Credit card or debit card? Fixed rate or tracker? What is the Bank of England base rate? What about when it comes to applying for a mortgage? Other discussion points could include: Choosing products from the supermarket, such as cleaning products – which chemicals are safe to use? Should we worry about bird flu? Can foot and mouth disease affect humans?

6. Why study science and maths? Understanding current issues Alternative, sustainable energy resources New communication technology Combating climate change and global warming Genetically modified foods New medicines and vaccines Gene therapy Bird flu Understanding current issues Before showing these bullet points, ask the audience for suggestions of some current issues that involve the application of science and maths. (In fact, they may not be able to think of any issues that don’t involve science and maths). Discuss how science and maths are applicable to each bullet point listed: Alternative, sustainable energy resources – finding new energy resources e.g. researching the chemical and physical properties of biodiesel, designing wind turbines. New communication technology e.g. from internet communication via email to new mobile phone technology (e.g. iPod touch) to Skype – how do these all work? Who designed them? Who maintains and services them? Combating climate change and global warming – reducing carbon emissions in vehicle and industrial exhaust. Genetically modified foods – what does it actually mean? Does it matter? What potentially harmful effects could they have on our health? New medicines and vaccines – understanding a new and innovative treatment for diabetes or asthma, how it works, what the advantages are compared to previous therapies. Forming an opinion on controversial issues such as the MMR vaccine – should you allow your child to receive it? Do the benefits outweigh the risks? Being able to make an informed decision. Gene therapy – what does this mean? What are the advantages? How could it change the future? Bird flu – is it a risk to us? How dangerous is it? Being able to make a judgement based on scientific evidence and research.Understanding current issues Before showing these bullet points, ask the audience for suggestions of some current issues that involve the application of science and maths. (In fact, they may not be able to think of any issues that don’t involve science and maths). Discuss how science and maths are applicable to each bullet point listed: Alternative, sustainable energy resources – finding new energy resources e.g. researching the chemical and physical properties of biodiesel, designing wind turbines. New communication technology e.g. from internet communication via email to new mobile phone technology (e.g. iPod touch) to Skype – how do these all work? Who designed them? Who maintains and services them? Combating climate change and global warming – reducing carbon emissions in vehicle and industrial exhaust. Genetically modified foods – what does it actually mean? Does it matter? What potentially harmful effects could they have on our health? New medicines and vaccines – understanding a new and innovative treatment for diabetes or asthma, how it works, what the advantages are compared to previous therapies. Forming an opinion on controversial issues such as the MMR vaccine – should you allow your child to receive it? Do the benefits outweigh the risks? Being able to make an informed decision. Gene therapy – what does this mean? What are the advantages? How could it change the future? Bird flu – is it a risk to us? How dangerous is it? Being able to make a judgement based on scientific evidence and research.

7. Why study science and maths? Transferable skills Teamwork Problem solving IT Communication Numeracy Transferable skills Discussion point – ask the audience what they understand by ‘transferable’ skills? Why are they useful? Do they need to be learned or do they ‘come naturally’ to the student? How important are they when it comes to applying for a job? Transferable skills are those that are highly relevant which can be applied to life, learning (not just science and maths) and work (all jobs/workplaces – not just scientists and mathematicians). (If presenting to teachers, you may also wish to mention Bloom’s taxonomy: Science and mathematics develop skills in the higher levels of Bloom’s taxonomy and learning techniques within the affective domain.) Slides 8-12 include examples of how some transferable skills are used (and are useful) in school and in ‘real life’ – at work, for example. Transferable skills Discussion point – ask the audience what they understand by ‘transferable’ skills? Why are they useful? Do they need to be learned or do they ‘come naturally’ to the student? How important are they when it comes to applying for a job? Transferable skills are those that are highly relevant which can be applied to life, learning (not just science and maths) and work (all jobs/workplaces – not just scientists and mathematicians). (If presenting to teachers, you may also wish to mention Bloom’s taxonomy: Science and mathematics develop skills in the higher levels of Bloom’s taxonomy and learning techniques within the affective domain.) Slides 8-12 include examples of how some transferable skills are used (and are useful) in school and in ‘real life’ – at work, for example.

8. Why study science and maths? Teamwork skills In school Working together during a chemistry experiment At work A nurse – working to treat and monitor critically or terminally ill patients A lighting technician – setting up equipment on stage at a concert venue Teamwork skills Ask how teamwork contributes to learning. Discuss how it is beneficial in the workplace – developing diplomacy, resolving issues, conflict management etc. Discuss in school and at work examples. Ask for additional suggestions on how teamwork skills could be applied in the workplace. Teamwork skills Ask how teamwork contributes to learning. Discuss how it is beneficial in the workplace – developing diplomacy, resolving issues, conflict management etc. Discuss in school and at work examples. Ask for additional suggestions on how teamwork skills could be applied in the workplace.

9. In school Carrying out an investigation in maths to prove a rule true or false At work An architect – designing a building to withstand vibration from heavy road traffic A computer games designer – working out the technical specifications behind the game Why study science and maths? Problem solving skills Problem solving skills Ask how problem solving skills are useful in life. Discuss how they could be beneficial in the workplace – from customer relations to overcoming traffic congestion. Discuss in school and at work examples. Ask for additional suggestions on how problem solving skills could be applied in the workplace.Problem solving skills Ask how problem solving skills are useful in life. Discuss how they could be beneficial in the workplace – from customer relations to overcoming traffic congestion. Discuss in school and at work examples. Ask for additional suggestions on how problem solving skills could be applied in the workplace.

10. In school Making a PowerPoint presentation to the class of a project you’ve researched At work A marketing manager – presenting the latest sales figures of the competitor market A health records clerk – designing a database to hold confidential patient records and data in a hospital Why study science and maths? IT skills IT skills Discuss how ICT contributes to learning. Discuss how fast ICT has developed in education, from using ICT within every subject of the curriculum to teachers using interactive white boards. Ask how ICT skills are useful in life. From managing domestic budget, to shopping on the internet, to researching what car to buy, to downloading music from iTunes! Discuss how ICT skills have become essential in almost every workplace – from booking appointments and charging clients as a beauty therapist, to weather forecasting. Discuss in school and at work examples. Ask for additional suggestions on how ICT skills could be applied in the workplace.IT skills Discuss how ICT contributes to learning. Discuss how fast ICT has developed in education, from using ICT within every subject of the curriculum to teachers using interactive white boards. Ask how ICT skills are useful in life. From managing domestic budget, to shopping on the internet, to researching what car to buy, to downloading music from iTunes! Discuss how ICT skills have become essential in almost every workplace – from booking appointments and charging clients as a beauty therapist, to weather forecasting. Discuss in school and at work examples. Ask for additional suggestions on how ICT skills could be applied in the workplace.

11. Why study science and maths? Communication skills In school Explaining how to re-wire a plug At work Naval officer – training a team on how to respond to an emergency Civil engineer – directing construction engineers in the building of a new bridge Communication skills Discuss how communication skills are involved in education and learning. Discuss the different types of communication skills – the verbal and non-verbal, the learned and inherent. Ask how good communication skills are useful in life. From explaining clearly to a doctor what symptoms we have, to writing a letter of appeal or complaint about a parking fine! Discuss how communication skills are essential in every workplace – from an air traffic controller, to an police officer to a politician. Discuss in school and at work examples. Ask for additional suggestions on how communication skills are useful in the workplace. Communication skills Discuss how communication skills are involved in education and learning. Discuss the different types of communication skills – the verbal and non-verbal, the learned and inherent. Ask how good communication skills are useful in life. From explaining clearly to a doctor what symptoms we have, to writing a letter of appeal or complaint about a parking fine! Discuss how communication skills are essential in every workplace – from an air traffic controller, to an police officer to a politician. Discuss in school and at work examples. Ask for additional suggestions on how communication skills are useful in the workplace.

12. Why study science and maths? Numeracy skills Numeracy skills Discuss how numeracy skills contribute to learning. Discuss how relevant numeracy is to many subjects within the curriculum. From Geography – calculating land area or plotting maps or graphs, to Design and Technology – calculating the quantity of materials required for a particular project and how important accurate measurement is to the finished product. Ask how numeracy skills are useful in life. From understanding and applying for a loan, to managing a tight budget at college or university without going too over-drawn! Discuss how numeracy skills are important and relevant in the workplace – from calculating budget and estimating costs when planning a school trip to calculating the correct dose of a drug to be given to an animal. Discuss in school and at work examples. Ask for additional suggestions on how numeracy skills are important in the workplace. Numeracy skills Discuss how numeracy skills contribute to learning. Discuss how relevant numeracy is to many subjects within the curriculum. From Geography – calculating land area or plotting maps or graphs, to Design and Technology – calculating the quantity of materials required for a particular project and how important accurate measurement is to the finished product. Ask how numeracy skills are useful in life. From understanding and applying for a loan, to managing a tight budget at college or university without going too over-drawn! Discuss how numeracy skills are important and relevant in the workplace – from calculating budget and estimating costs when planning a school trip to calculating the correct dose of a drug to be given to an animal. Discuss in school and at work examples. Ask for additional suggestions on how numeracy skills are important in the workplace.

13. Why study science and maths? You can do anything! You can do anything! The slide is populated with a wide variety of jobs (most are taken from a list of “top jobs” as suggested by teenagers (male and female), obtained from Connexions). Ask the audience which jobs they think use knowledge gained from science and/or maths, and which definitely don’t. You should find that all jobs, to some degree, use knowledge gained from science and maths. E.g.: Painter decorator – calculation of how much paint is required, what type of paints are best suited for certain jobs Carpenter – lots of calculations, precise measurements, trigonometry, properties of materials Armed forces – engineering, logistics, distance calculations Vet – animal biology, chemistry for prescribing medicines Engineer – calculations, understanding materials, forces, electricity, how chemicals behave. Lawyer – understanding statistics, forensic science Hairdresser – using chemicals, structure of nails and skin, health and safety Forensic Scientist – human anatomy, chemistry, calculations, using data Pilot – the physics of flight, understanding weather patterns, calculations for navigation Physiotherapist – human anatomy, forces for lifting people, psychology Nurse – human biology, calculations for drugs, understanding how various apparatus works, taking measurements Journalist – checking statistics, understanding a range of science                         Electrician – how electricity works, energy sources, insulation, electrical calculations, how materials perform Pop star – calculations for income and tax, using ICT and electronics, using electricity safely Nursery nurse – how the human body develops, anatomy, psychology Fashion Designer – calculations for cloth quantities, ICT for design software, how materials behave, physics of colour, chemistry of dyes Secretary – using ICT for word processing and data handling, calculations Optician – anatomy of the eye and brain, optics, human disease, chemistry for prescribing medicines, how materials behave Primary school teacher – calculations to chart pupil progress, understanding maths and science to teach to others Weather forecaster – using statistics, calculating weather patterns, understanding the atmosphere and what affects it, using ICT Explain that this list isn’t exhaustive – the idea is that science is all around us and so we use, or benefit from, the skills and knowledge gained from science and maths in almost every area of employment. Discuss the differences between jobs “in-science” (those that require specific qualifications and skills) and jobs “from-science” (those whereby a science knowledge is extremely useful, if not strictly necessary). You could add to, delete or replace jobs as appropriate (just make sure they can be justified in terms of using skills or knowledge gained from science and maths).You can do anything! The slide is populated with a wide variety of jobs (most are taken from a list of “top jobs” as suggested by teenagers (male and female), obtained from Connexions). Ask the audience which jobs they think use knowledge gained from science and/or maths, and which definitely don’t. You should find that all jobs, to some degree, use knowledge gained from science and maths. E.g.: Painter decorator – calculation of how much paint is required, what type of paints are best suited for certain jobs Carpenter – lots of calculations, precise measurements, trigonometry, properties of materials Armed forces – engineering, logistics, distance calculations Vet – animal biology, chemistry for prescribing medicines Engineer – calculations, understanding materials, forces, electricity, how chemicals behave. Lawyer – understanding statistics, forensic science Hairdresser – using chemicals, structure of nails and skin, health and safety Forensic Scientist – human anatomy, chemistry, calculations, using data Pilot – the physics of flight, understanding weather patterns, calculations for navigation Physiotherapist – human anatomy, forces for lifting people, psychology Nurse – human biology, calculations for drugs, understanding how various apparatus works, taking measurements Journalist – checking statistics, understanding a range of science                         Electrician – how electricity works, energy sources, insulation, electrical calculations, how materials perform Pop star – calculations for income and tax, using ICT and electronics, using electricity safely Nursery nurse – how the human body develops, anatomy, psychology Fashion Designer – calculations for cloth quantities, ICT for design software, how materials behave, physics of colour, chemistry of dyes Secretary – using ICT for word processing and data handling, calculations Optician – anatomy of the eye and brain, optics, human disease, chemistry for prescribing medicines, how materials behave Primary school teacher – calculations to chart pupil progress, understanding maths and science to teach to others Weather forecaster – using statistics, calculating weather patterns, understanding the atmosphere and what affects it, using ICT Explain that this list isn’t exhaustive – the idea is that science is all around us and so we use, or benefit from, the skills and knowledge gained from science and maths in almost every area of employment. Discuss the differences between jobs “in-science” (those that require specific qualifications and skills) and jobs “from-science” (those whereby a science knowledge is extremely useful, if not strictly necessary). You could add to, delete or replace jobs as appropriate (just make sure they can be justified in terms of using skills or knowledge gained from science and maths).

14. Why study science and maths? Job profiles Job profiles This is a chance to explore four jobs in a little more detail. The examples aim to show a stark contrast in the types of job that benefit from science and maths knowledge – people who studied science, people who use science and people who do science. Examples, from left to right: Suresh Chawla, Theatre Technician Emma Snead, Bakery Manager Campbell Murn, Raptor Biologist Nina Gronw-Lewis, Glass Artist (Note: when live, the Future Morph website will showcase ten jobs in the same level of detail)Job profiles This is a chance to explore four jobs in a little more detail. The examples aim to show a stark contrast in the types of job that benefit from science and maths knowledge – people who studied science, people who use science and people who do science. Examples, from left to right: Suresh Chawla, Theatre Technician Emma Snead, Bakery Manager Campbell Murn, Raptor Biologist Nina Gronw-Lewis, Glass Artist (Note: when live, the Future Morph website will showcase ten jobs in the same level of detail)

15. Suresh Chawla, theatre technician Suresh uses science and maths … There is an accompanying video profile of Suresh which can be found on the teacher section of www.futuremorph.org. You could choose to show the video to the audience, or just view it yourself to get familiarised with it. Suresh works and communicates with people, such as … Explain that Suresh works with numerous other people. The idea: there are other jobs in the same area of employment that benefit from science and maths. Furthermore, if you work with, or communicate with, people with science and maths knowledge, then having some knowledge will aid those communications – so science and maths filters through wide and extended networks of jobs.Suresh Chawla, theatre technician Suresh uses science and maths … There is an accompanying video profile of Suresh which can be found on the teacher section of www.futuremorph.org. You could choose to show the video to the audience, or just view it yourself to get familiarised with it. Suresh works and communicates with people, such as … Explain that Suresh works with numerous other people. The idea: there are other jobs in the same area of employment that benefit from science and maths. Furthermore, if you work with, or communicate with, people with science and maths knowledge, then having some knowledge will aid those communications – so science and maths filters through wide and extended networks of jobs.

16. Emma Snead, Bakery manager Emma uses science and maths … There is an accompanying video profile of Emma which can be found on the teacher section of www.futuremorph.org. You could choose to show the video to the audience, or just view it yourself to get familiarised with it. Emma works and communicates with people, such as … Explain that Emma works with numerous other people. The idea: there are other jobs in the same area of employment that benefit from science and maths. Furthermore, if you work with, or communicate with, people with science and maths knowledge, then having some knowledge will aid those communications – so science and maths filters through wide and extended networks of jobs. Emma Snead, Bakery manager Emma uses science and maths … There is an accompanying video profile of Emma which can be found on the teacher section of www.futuremorph.org. You could choose to show the video to the audience, or just view it yourself to get familiarised with it. Emma works and communicates with people, such as … Explain that Emma works with numerous other people. The idea: there are other jobs in the same area of employment that benefit from science and maths. Furthermore, if you work with, or communicate with, people with science and maths knowledge, then having some knowledge will aid those communications – so science and maths filters through wide and extended networks of jobs.

17. Campbell Murn, Raptor biologist Campbell uses science and maths … There is an accompanying video profile of Campbell which can be found on the teacher section of www.futuremorph.org. You could choose to show the video to the audience, or just view it yourself to get familiarised with it. Campbell works and communicates with people, such as … Explain that Campbell works with numerous other people. The idea: there are other jobs in the same area of employment that benefit from science and maths. Furthermore, if you work with, or communicate with, people with science and maths knowledge, then having some knowledge will aid those communications – so science and maths filters through wide and extended networks of jobs. Campbell Murn, Raptor biologist Campbell uses science and maths … There is an accompanying video profile of Campbell which can be found on the teacher section of www.futuremorph.org. You could choose to show the video to the audience, or just view it yourself to get familiarised with it. Campbell works and communicates with people, such as … Explain that Campbell works with numerous other people. The idea: there are other jobs in the same area of employment that benefit from science and maths. Furthermore, if you work with, or communicate with, people with science and maths knowledge, then having some knowledge will aid those communications – so science and maths filters through wide and extended networks of jobs.

18. Nina Gronw-Lewis, Glass artist Nina uses science and maths … There is an accompanying video profile of Nina which can be found on the teacher section of www.futuremorph.org. You could choose to show the video to the audience, or just view it yourself to get familiarised with it. Nina works and communicates with people, such as … Explain that Nina works with numerous other people. The idea: there are other jobs in the same area of employment that benefit from science and maths. Furthermore, if you work with, or communicate with, people with science and maths knowledge, then having some knowledge will aid those communications – so science and maths filters through wide and extended networks of jobs.Nina Gronw-Lewis, Glass artist Nina uses science and maths … There is an accompanying video profile of Nina which can be found on the teacher section of www.futuremorph.org. You could choose to show the video to the audience, or just view it yourself to get familiarised with it. Nina works and communicates with people, such as … Explain that Nina works with numerous other people. The idea: there are other jobs in the same area of employment that benefit from science and maths. Furthermore, if you work with, or communicate with, people with science and maths knowledge, then having some knowledge will aid those communications – so science and maths filters through wide and extended networks of jobs.

19. Why study science and maths? Your GCSE options 1 1. Core Science GCSE In addition to Core Science you should also take: • Additional General Science GCSE or • Additional Applied Science GCSE Your GCSE options 1 According to the National Curriculum, the different GCSE science options are illustrated on the next slides (19-23). However, all of these options may not be available at your school or college – therefore, please delete as appropriate. Your GCSE options 1 According to the National Curriculum, the different GCSE science options are illustrated on the next slides (19-23). However, all of these options may not be available at your school or college – therefore, please delete as appropriate.

20. Why study science and maths? Your GCSE options 2 or: 2. Biology, Chemistry and Physics GCSEs – as three separate GCSEs Your GCSE options 2 NB. According to the National Curriculum, this option may not be available at your school or college – therefore, please delete as appropriate. Your GCSE options 2 NB. According to the National Curriculum, this option may not be available at your school or college – therefore, please delete as appropriate.

21. Why study science and maths? Your GCSE options 3 or: 3. Applied Science Double Award – worth two GCSEs Your GCSE options 3 NB. According to the National Curriculum, this option may not be available at your school or college – therefore, please delete as appropriate.Your GCSE options 3 NB. According to the National Curriculum, this option may not be available at your school or college – therefore, please delete as appropriate.

22. Why study science and maths? Beyond GCSE If you are hoping: To study science beyond GCSE or To pursue a career that is science-related – it is advisable not to take only Core Science, as this could limit your options. Beyond GCSE Explain that by taking GCSE Core Science, future options in terms of further and higher education will be limited, since Core Science is not a great enough grounding to study sciences at A level or beyond. Also, by only taking Core Science, future job prospects may also be limited, especially those that utilize science in some way.Beyond GCSE Explain that by taking GCSE Core Science, future options in terms of further and higher education will be limited, since Core Science is not a great enough grounding to study sciences at A level or beyond. Also, by only taking Core Science, future job prospects may also be limited, especially those that utilize science in some way.

23. Why study science and maths? Maths GCSE If you want to study any of the sciences at a higher level then – a good grade in Maths GCSE is important. Maths GCSE Explain that maths and understanding of numeracy underpins all the science and technology subjects beyond GCSE and that a good grade in maths is important if students are planning to study any of these subjects further.Maths GCSE Explain that maths and understanding of numeracy underpins all the science and technology subjects beyond GCSE and that a good grade in maths is important if students are planning to study any of these subjects further.

24. Why study science and maths? Standard grades 1 – Scotland You must take at least one of the following Standard grades: • Biology • Chemistry • Physics • General Science (combines Biology, Physics and Chemistry) Standard grades 1 – Scotland Explain the Standard grade choices in Scotland.Standard grades 1 – Scotland Explain the Standard grade choices in Scotland.

25. Why study science and maths? Standard grades 2 – Scotland If you take just one science Standard grade, your options for many careers using science will be limited You should take at least two science subjects from: Biology Physics Chemistry Standard grades 2 – Scotland Explain that, as with GCSE in England, by taking only one Standard grade, future options in terms of further and higher education will be limited, since Core Science is not a great enough grounding to study sciences at Higher level or beyond. Also, by only taking one Standard grade in a science subject, future job prospects may also be limited, especially those that utilize science in some way. Standard grades 2 – Scotland Explain that, as with GCSE in England, by taking only one Standard grade, future options in terms of further and higher education will be limited, since Core Science is not a great enough grounding to study sciences at Higher level or beyond. Also, by only taking one Standard grade in a science subject, future job prospects may also be limited, especially those that utilize science in some way.

26. Why study science and maths? Standard grade maths If you want to study any of the sciences at a higher level then – a good grade in Maths Standard grade is important. Standard grade maths Explain that maths and understanding of numeracy underpins all the science and technology subjects beyond Standard grade and that a good grade in maths is important if students are planning to study any of these subjects further. Standard grade maths Explain that maths and understanding of numeracy underpins all the science and technology subjects beyond Standard grade and that a good grade in maths is important if students are planning to study any of these subjects further.

27. Why study science and maths? Where to find out more Teachers Careers advisers www.connexions-direct.com www.futuremorph.org Where to find out more You may wish to add or delete sources of further information, according to your preference. Here are some regional examples you may wish to use: Connexions: www.connexions.gov.uk/ Careers Scotland: www.careers-scotland.org.uk Careers Service Northern Ireland: www.careersserviceni.com Careers Wales: www.careerswales.com Directgov: http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/EducationAndLearning/UniversityAndHigherEducation/StudentFinance/index.htm UCAS: www.ucas.com Where to find out more You may wish to add or delete sources of further information, according to your preference. Here are some regional examples you may wish to use: Connexions: www.connexions.gov.uk/ Careers Scotland: www.careers-scotland.org.uk Careers Service Northern Ireland: www.careersserviceni.com Careers Wales: www.careerswales.com Directgov: http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/EducationAndLearning/UniversityAndHigherEducation/StudentFinance/index.htm UCAS: www.ucas.com

28. Why study science and maths? Become someone Keep your options open Stay flexible and maximise your career options Increase your chances of future employment Gain a highly respected and well paid job Become whoever you want to be in your future… Become someone Conclude that studying science and maths keeps further or higher education options open, offers a good progression route either directly into employment or to higher education to study them or other related subjects further. Explain how science and maths open doors to a vast choice of career options, both in and beyond science. By opting for science and maths, students could find themselves contributing to ensuring the future of the planet as well as safe-guarding their own secure future in the world of employment. Become someone Conclude that studying science and maths keeps further or higher education options open, offers a good progression route either directly into employment or to higher education to study them or other related subjects further. Explain how science and maths open doors to a vast choice of career options, both in and beyond science. By opting for science and maths, students could find themselves contributing to ensuring the future of the planet as well as safe-guarding their own secure future in the world of employment.

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