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School-Wide Positive Behavior Support: Rationale, Readiness, Features. George Sugai OSEP Center on PBIS Center for Behavioral Education & Research University of Connecticut August 20, 2008 www.pbis.org www.cber.org [email protected] PURPOSE

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School wide positive behavior support rationale readiness features l.jpg

School-Wide Positive Behavior Support: Rationale, Readiness, Features

George Sugai

OSEP Center on PBIS

Center for Behavioral Education & Research

University of Connecticut

August 20, 2008

www.pbis.org www.cber.org

[email protected]


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  • PURPOSE

  • Describe SWPBS rationale, features, & examples

  • Review readiness commitments & agreements


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SWPBS is about….


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SW-PBS Logic!

Successful individual student behavior support is linked to host environments or school climates that are effective, efficient, relevant, & durable

(Zins & Ponti, 1990)


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2 WORRIES

  • Get Tough (practices)

  • Train-&-Hope (systems)


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Worry #1“Teaching” by Getting Tough

Runyon: “I hate this f____ing school, & you’re a dumbf_____.”

Teacher: “That is disrespectful language. I’m sending you to the office so you’ll learn never to say those words again….starting now!”


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Immediate & seductive solution….”Get Tough!”

  • Clamp down & increase monitoring

  • Re-re-re-review rules

  • Extend continuum & consistency of consequences

  • Establish “bottom line”

    ...Predictable individual response


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Reactive responses are predictable….

When we experience aversive situation, we select interventions that produce immediate relief

  • Remove student

  • Remove ourselves

  • Modify physical environment

  • Assign responsibility for change to student &/or others


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When behavior doesn’t improve, we “Get Tougher!”

  • Zero tolerance policies

  • Increased surveillance

  • Increased suspension & expulsion

  • In-service training by expert

  • Alternative programming

    …..Predictable systems response!


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Erroneous assumption that student…

  • Is inherently “bad”

  • Will learn more appropriate behavior through increased use of “aversives”

  • Will be better tomorrow…….


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But….false sense of safety/security!

  • Fosters environments of control

  • Triggers & reinforces antisocial behavior

  • Shifts accountability away from school

  • Devalues child-adult relationship

  • Weakens relationship between academic & social behavior programming


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Science of behavior has taught us that students….

  • Are NOT born with “bad behaviors”

  • Do NOT learn when presented contingent aversive consequences

    ……..Do learn better ways of behaving by being taught directly & receiving positive feedback.


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VIOLENCE PREVENTION?

  • Surgeon General’s Report on Youth Violence (2001)

  • Coordinated Social Emotional & Learning (Greenberg et al., 2003)

  • Center for Study & Prevention of Violence (2006)

  • White House Conference on School Violence (2006)

  • Positive, predictable school-wide climate

  • High rates of academic & social success

  • Formal social skills instruction

  • Positive active supervision & reinforcement

  • Positive adult role models

  • Multi-component, multi-year school-family-community effort


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Worry #2:“Train & Hope”


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Supporting Social Competence &

Academic Achievement

4 PBS Elements

OUTCOMES

Supporting

Decision

Making

Supporting

Staff Behavior

DATA

SYSTEMS

PRACTICES

Supporting

Student Behavior


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Tertiary Prevention:

Specialized

Individualized

Systems for Students with High-Risk Behavior

CONTINUUM OF

SCHOOL-WIDE

INSTRUCTIONAL &

POSITIVE BEHAVIOR

SUPPORT

~5%

Secondary Prevention:

Specialized Group

Systems for Students with At-Risk Behavior

~15%

Primary Prevention:

School-/Classroom-

Wide Systems for

All Students,

Staff, & Settings

~80% of Students


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Responsiveness-to-Intervention & SWPBS


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Team

GENERAL IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS: “Getting Started”

Agreements

Data-based

Action Plan

Evaluation

Implementation


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SWPBS

Subsystems

School-wide

Classroom

Family

Non-classroom

Student


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School-wide

1.Common purpose & approach to discipline

2.Clear set of positive expectations & behaviors

3. Procedures for teaching expected behavior

4.Continuum of procedures for encouraging expected behavior

5. Continuum of procedures for discouraging inappropriate behavior

6. Procedures for on-going monitoring & evaluation


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Non-classroom

  • Positive expectations & routines taught & encouraged

  • Active supervision by all staff

    • Scan, move, interact

  • Precorrections & reminders

  • Positive reinforcement


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Classroom

  • Classroom-wide positive expectations taught & encouraged

  • Teaching classroom routines & cuestaught & encouraged

  • Ratio of 6-8 positive to 1 negative adult-student interaction

  • Active supervision

  • Redirections for minor, infrequent behavior errors

  • Frequent precorrections for chronic errors

  • Effective academic instruction & curriculum


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  • Individual Student

  • Behavioral competence at school & district levels

  • Function-based behavior support planning

  • Team- & data-based decision making

  • Comprehensive person-centered planning & wraparound processes

  • Targeted social skills & self-management instruction

  • Individualized instructional & curricular accommodations


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Family

  • Continuum of positive behavior support for all families

  • Frequent, regular positive contacts, communications, & acknowledgements

  • Formal & active participation & involvement as equal partner

  • Access to system of integrated school & community resources


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Teaching Academics & Behaviors


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PBS Systems Implementation Logic

Visibility

Funding

Political

Support

Leadership Team

Active & Integrated Coordination

Training

Evaluation

Coaching

Local School Teams/Demonstrations


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SWPBS Process Overview


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