The effects of mobile phone use on pedestrian crossing behaviour
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The effects of mobile phone use on pedestrian crossing behaviour at signalised and unsignalised intersections. 學生:董瑩蟬. Purpose. This paper main investigated the pedestrian crossing road behavior. When the pedestrian used mobile phone that there behavior different with no used mobile phone.

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The effects of mobile phone use on pedestrian crossing behaviourat signalised and unsignalised intersections

學生:董瑩蟬


Purpose
Purpose behaviour

  • This paper main investigated the pedestrian crossing road behavior.

  • When the pedestrian used mobile phone that there behavior different with no used mobile phone.

  • When the pedestrian crossing at the signalised and unsignalised intersectionsthat behavior different.


Reference
Reference behaviour

  • According to the statistics data found the pedestrian accident rate between 11 to 14 percentage. (NHTAS, 2006; Australian Transport safety Bureau, 2005)

  • When the vehicle speed more than 40 km/h that pedestrian has higher risk. (Ashton,1981)

  • The 15% pedestrian accident because they owe attention. (Bungum et al.,2005)


Reference1
Reference behaviour

  • Many studies found that mobile phone impact attention for driver. (Caird et al.,2004; Horrey et al., 2004; Young et al.,2003)

  • The road crossing behavior demand several cognitive attention. (Tabibi et al., 2003; Whitebread et al., 1999)


Reference2
Reference behaviour

  • Some studies showed that the mobile phone have negative impacts. (Gartner et al., 2002)

  • The auditory distraction may effect the driver performance. (Green et al.,1993; Jancke et al.,1994)


Method
Method behaviour

  • There are 546 participant this study.

  • There were three groups on this study, there are used phone, no used phone but cross the same direction (time- matched control), no used phone but age and gender the same time-matched control (demographic-match control).

  • The recorded data described with table 1.


Method1
Method behaviour


Result
Result behaviour

  • The pedestrian distributed:

  • 270 females and 276 Males.

  • There are 48 at low socioeconomic status, 330 medium and 168 high.

  • 240 at signalised and 306 at unsignalised intersections.

  • There were 390 observed on weekday, 237 on weekend.

  • The observed 158 in the morning, 292 in the afternoon, 96 in the evening.


Result1
Result behaviour

  • There were one-third of three groups, include cas and

  • demographic-matched control, time-matched control

  • and using mobile phone.


Result2
Result behaviour

  • The time-matched control groups were significantly older than case and demographic-matched control.(t562=7.52,P<.001)

  • There were 182 pedestrian used mobile phone when crossing road. There were include 140 hand-held, 6 hand-free and 36 text messaging.


Result3
Result behaviour


Result4
Result behaviour

  • The females used mobile phone

  • that crossing speed slower than

  • demographic-matched control.

  • (F(1,59)=4.529, p=0.038)

  • The males talking on a phone

  • that crossing speed faster than

  • time-matched control.

  • (F(1,57)=7.991,p=0.006)

  • The males talking on a phone

  • that crossing speed not different

  • from demographic.

  • (F(1,65)=0.016, p=.899)


Result5
Result behaviour


Result6
Result behaviour

  • The female talking on a mobile

  • phone that crossing speed

  • not different from controls.

  • (F(1,138)=0.002, p=.963)

  • The males talking on a mobile

  • phone that crossing speed

  • slower than demographic-

  • match control.

  • (F(1,57)=1.121,P=.291)


Discussion
Discussion behaviour

  • The pedestrian used mobile phone that crossing speed slower than no used mobile phone. It similar to Bungum et al. (2005) that found the cognitive distraction.

  • Some studies found that the driver used mobile phone the driving speed become slower. (Brown et al.,1969; Burns et al.,2002…ect.)

  • Many studies showed the used mobile phone that increased driver workload.

    (Cain et al.,1999; Atchley et al.,2004…ect.)


Conclusion
Conclusion behaviour

  • The pedestrian used mobile phone when they crossing road that increased cognitive distribution.

  • The pedestrian used mobile phone that may effect the road crossing safety.


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