Impact of criminal justice system coercion on drug abuse treatment
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Impact of Criminal Justice System Coercion on Drug Abuse Treatment PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Impact of Criminal Justice System Coercion on Drug Abuse Treatment. David Duncan 1 , John B. White 2 , Thomas Nicholson 2. 1 Duncan & Associates 2 Western Kentucky University. Former NIDA Director Robert Dupont.

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Impact of Criminal Justice System Coercion on Drug Abuse Treatment

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Impact of Criminal Justice System Coercion on Drug Abuse Treatment

David Duncan1, John B. White2, Thomas Nicholson2

1 Duncan & Associates

2 Western Kentucky University


Former NIDA Director Robert Dupont

  • Reducing penalties for drug possession and sales reduces the pressure on addicts to stop using drugs. As such it is an enabling step . . . What is needed is not a lesser or eliminated penalties, but strategies to make the penalties for possession and sale of illicit drugs more effective and less costly to society.


And…

  • Removing penalties for drug sale and possession is surrendering to the illicit drug epidemic.

  • (Dupont, 1997, p. 438)


Sher Horosko (1997)

  • Most of us here believe that substance abuse is a disease. But how many of us also believe that criminal sanctions — proven to be the number one catalyst for getting people into treatment — are the only or the best incentive to human healing we can provide.


Con’t…

  • There is a belief in our field that the threat of punishment and the attendant loss of freedom, family, and friends is acceptable, even laudable, to force a person into his or her own recovery . . . The elders in our field have come to accept this coercive catalyst as necessary.


Effects of Coercion:

  • Does such coercion bring a large proportion of patients into treatment

  • Are coerced patients different from those who enter treatment without legal coercion?


Further:

  • Does coercion bring a larger proportion of heroin and other more “hard core” abusers into treatment?

  • Does coercion bring patients into treatment at an earlier stage in their history of abuse?


Treatment Episode Data System

  • Is a continuation of the former Client Data System (CDS) that was originally developed by the Alcohol, Drug Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

  • The TEDS data collection effort began in 1989 with three-year development grants to states.

  • Treatment providers that receive any state agency funding are expected to provide TEDS data for all clients admitted to treatment, regardless of the source of funding for individual clients.

  • http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-SERIES/00056.xml


Description of Sample

  • 20.5 million

  • 1992-2003

  • Concatenated dataset

  • Covers all 50 States and Puerto Rico


Patients by Referral


Prior Admissions


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