technical college system of georgia office of adult education january 16 2014
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Technical College System of Georgia Office of Adult Education January 16, 2014. Setting Student Learner Expectations. Technical Housekeeping. On the day of the teleconference, call 1-866-590-5055 and enter access code 8019870#

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technical housekeeping
Technical Housekeeping
  • On the day of the teleconference, call 1-866-590-5055 and enter access code 8019870#
  • Please mute your phone line to minimize background noise.
  • Technical Difficulties? Email [email protected]
  • When asking questions, please state your name, program, and location.
  • Please complete the online evaluation form.
teleconference overview
Teleconference Overview
  • Introduction – Leatricia A. Williams, GPS Coordinator
  • Presenters

Kerry Bankston, Lead Instructor, Georgia Northwestern Technical College

Francia Browne, Assistant Director, Cobb County School District

Danielle Steele, Instructor, Chattahoochee Technical College

  • Questions of Presenters
  • Sharing from Others
  • Closing Remarks – Leatricia A. Williams
introduction
Introduction

The Aim of the Workshop: 

  • The aim of this session is to provide the audience of ABE/ASE instructors/practitioners with information and resources that are relevant; and identified as proven strategies used with your local program.

The Research Statement:

  • The writer of a research article asserts, “Generally speaking, students must understand what they are expected to learn before they can take responsibility for their own learning.”
slide6

Francia Browne, Assistant Director

Cobb -Paulding Adult Education Center

“Setting Student Learner Expectations”

learning culture
Learning Culture
  • High expectations for allstudentsis one of the defining characteristics of school reform.
  • Setting student learning expectations is important in academic successand needs to be made clear at the initial entrance stage—orientation process.
  • Students must understand what they are expected to learn before they can take responsibility for their own learning—this starts with a well structured and informative orientation process.
  • One crucial step is the pre-testing process and what it means for the student or is an interviewing benefit —analysis and interpretation (TABE scores).
  • Orientation is a stepping stone that equates to program retention and completions which equals academicsuccess.
learning culture continued
Learning Culture - Continued
  • Effective classroom management is essential in setting learning. It enables students to understand what instructors expect them to know, understand, and be able to do.
  • A key factor of this component is lesson planning-using the Madeline Hunter Instructional Model (see model).
  • The Seven Components:
      • Objectives
      • Standards (benchmarks)
      • Anticipatory set (ice breaker)
      • Teaching (input, modeling, checking for understanding)
      • Guided practice/monitoring
      • Closure
      • Independent practice
learning culture continued1
Learning Culture -Continued

Madeline Hunter Lesson Plan

learning culture continued2
Learning Culture -Continued
  • Students must see evidence of instructors and administrators as active participants in the learning process, such as, Classroom Observations.
  • Instructors play an important role in assisting students in setting learning expectations—they too must be active participants in the learning process.
  • For example, engaging activities may include professional development sessions, post-conferences, quarterly conferences, and participating in the implementation of their local instructors report cards.
  • When instructors establish high expectations for students this builds self-esteem, increases confidence and improves academic performance.
relationships
Relationships
  • Bill Daggett emphasizes the importance of establishing high expectations for all students –relationships- know your students.
  • Students ability levels require differentiation of instruction. Effective instruction requires knowingone’s students and planning to address those needs with research-based strategies.
  • Skills Tutor, ITTS (Instruction Targeted for TABE Success), and Pre/GED, provide direct and indirect instructional delivery.
relationships continued
Relationships -Continued
  • These models may be used as supplements for direct learning and indirect/ online(distance learning).
  • Research based online instructional models make it possible for students and instructors to reach goals enumerated in a student’s StudentEducation Plan (SEP) which is crucial to a student’s success in the program.
  • Instructor planning is essential in setting student learner expectations.
  • Students depend on and respond to consistentexpectationsandfeedbackfrom instructors.
how gntc s whitfield murray campus sets expectations
How GNTC’s Whitfield-Murray Campus Sets Expectations:
  • Orientation at TABE pretest
  • Goal setting at orientation
  • Orientation package
    • Explanation of program and course offerings
    • Adult Education Roadmap (ESL > ABE > GED > Post-Secondary)
    • Behavior, dress code, attendance policy, recognition of achievement
how gntc s whitfield murray campus sets expectations1
How GNTC’s Whitfield-Murray Campus Sets Expectations:
  • Teachers orient students to classroom on Day 1
  • Teachers explain SEP on Day 1
  • Teachers conference with students regarding TABE pretest scores on Day 1
  • Teachers conference with students after post-test to reassess and update goals
how gntc s whitfield murray campus sets expectations2
How GNTC’s Whitfield-Murray Campus Sets Expectations:
  • Direct instruction classes have lesson plans with a daily agenda
  • Transition services are explained during orientation
remember
Remember:
  • Not all students have a clear understanding of what their expectations even are. This dialogue is key!
  • Help students break large expectations (earn my GED) into smaller, short-term expectations, or “milestones”
  • SMART goals! Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic, Time-Bound
the sep
The SEP
  • A contract
  • A map
  • A reference
  • A record
  • A key to successful communication
    • Student Education Plan
the sep as a contract
The SEP as a Contract
  • Establish clearly the rules for the students
  • Set tone for class for the rest of the semester
  • Establish what to expect from the teacher
the sep as a map
The SEP as a Map
  • Provide students with an outline of what they need to achieve
  • Use both curriculum and GED standards
  • Refer to daily
the sep as a reference
The SEP as a Reference
  • List additional resources for students
  • Reminder of what student has learned
  • Place to turn in case of absence
sep as a record
SEP as a Record
  • Witness learning process
  • Record success

(70% or higher mastery level)

  • Record success

70% or higher mastery level)

Study guide and reminder

  • Interactive between teacher and student
slide27

Adult Education Department GED® Mathematics

SEP Spring Semester (Morning Class) - continued

conclusion
Conclusion
  • The SEP is a useful toolwhen used as a communication device between the student and teacher
  • Integrating its daily use into the classroom will allow students a greater understanding of what to expect
  • In doing so, the teacher will be helping the student to feel confident in their learning environment
slide31

Questions for the Presenters

?

Please say your name, program and location before asking your question

slide34

Thank you for your participation!

Please complete an evaluation of this session at http://surveymonkey.com/s/TechnicallySpeakingExpectations

Next Technically Speaking session for administrators:

January 22, 2014 - 2:00-3:30 pm

Getting to Know your Staff through Visitation

and Monitoring

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