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Healthy Schools Program School Meals Training What s the Scoop on Portio...






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Materials Needed. Various serving tools (slicers, scales, scoops, spoodles, slotted or pierced spoodles, measuring cups, tongs, turners)(3)
Healthy Schools Program School Meals Training What s the S...

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2. Healthy Schools Program School Meals Training What?s the Scoop on Portion Control?

3. Materials Needed Various serving tools (slicers, scales, scoops, spoodles, slotted or pierced spoodles, measuring cups, tongs, turners) (3) #10 can of fruit in juice or light syrup (3) #8 scoop (3) sheet pans Portioning cups or bowls and spoons for each audience participant Measurement Conversion Chart -?Basics At A Glance Poster?- find at www.nfsmi.org

4. Here?s The Increase understanding of portion control and sizes. Assist participants in recognizing which serving utensils control portions and which do not. Understanding the effect of proper portion control on overall food cost. Provide information and resources to assist schools in meeting the Healthy Schools Program School Meals ?annual training? criteria

5. Reasons For Portion Control Improves customer satisfaction Ensures USDA reimbursable meal requirements Controls cost Minimizes waste Decreases amount of leftovers Facilitates proper forecasting Increases meal participation There are many reasons to use proper portion control throughout the daily practice of food preparation and service. Here are the most important reasons for portion control. ( Ask each participant to state a reason or discuss the reasons below) Customer Satisfaction ? Use standardized recipes and reduce complaints from students by offering uniform portion sizes and reduce the chances of running out of food towards the end of the serving period. Students eat with their eyes. They compare portions on each others? plates. Portion control ensures that customers receive equal amounts of food. Ensure USDA Reimbursable Meal Requirements ? Ensure that students receive the planned quantity of the food component (such as two grains/breads) or nutrients (such as proper percent of calories from fat, saturated fats, trans fat, milligrams of sodium). USDA meal requirements also insure that children of different ages get the adequate amount of nutrients needed at lunch and breakfast. It helps to control food costs by minimizing waste ? portion sizes that are too large can sometimes discourage younger children from eating. reducing the number of leftovers and the need for substitutions; and making it easier to forecast and calculate the quantity of food to purchase Students like to make their own choices. Offer more individual portion sizes that are eye appealing and interesting and watch your meal participation increase There are many reasons to use proper portion control throughout the daily practice of food preparation and service. Here are the most important reasons for portion control. ( Ask each participant to state a reason or discuss the reasons below) Customer Satisfaction ? Use standardized recipes and reduce complaints from students by offering uniform portion sizes and reduce the chances of running out of food towards the end of the serving period. Students eat with their eyes. They compare portions on each others? plates. Portion control ensures that customers receive equal amounts of food. Ensure USDA Reimbursable Meal Requirements ? Ensure that students receive the planned quantity of the food component (such as two grains/breads) or nutrients (such as proper percent of calories from fat, saturated fats, trans fat, milligrams of sodium). USDA meal requirements also insure that children of different ages get the adequate amount of nutrients needed at lunch and breakfast. It helps to control food costs by minimizing waste ? portion sizes that are too large can sometimes discourage younger children from eating. reducing the number of leftovers and the need for substitutions; and making it easier to forecast and calculate the quantity of food to purchase Students like to make their own choices. Offer more individual portion sizes that are eye appealing and interesting and watch your meal participation increase

6. Tools of the Trade Slicers Scales Scoops and Spoodles Slotted or Pierced Spoodles Measuring Cups (Display serving tools from your kitchen. Also include those that are not such as tongs and turners. Have participants identify the portion control tools and which are not.) Ask - What are portion control tools and/or utensils? Answer - A serving tool that measures the amount of food is a portion control tool. If it does not measure, it is not a tool. Example- tongs and turners. Slicers: are used for cutting consistent thickness. Slicers measures the thickness of a slice of food product. Scales: are used to determine the weight of portions. Scoops and Spoodles: Use these to serve fruits, mashed potatoes, rice and so on. They measure different serving sizes and are numbered to differentiate the sizes such as #8(1/2 cup), #16(1/4 cup) etc. Ladles: are used for liquid-type servings of soups, gravies, sauces, stews and creamed foods. Slotted, Pierced or Perforated Spoodles: are important for serving green beans, corn, peas, stewed fruits and other foods that are prepared in liquid that you don?t want to add to the portion. Measuring Cups: are used for measuring liquid and dry goods. The metal cups are used for measuring dry goods and the glass are used for measuring liquids And remember, ? a pinch or a handful? is not a measurement! (Display serving tools from your kitchen. Also include those that are not such as tongs and turners. Have participants identify the portion control tools and which are not.) Ask - What are portion control tools and/or utensils? Answer - A serving tool that measures the amount of food is a portion control tool. If it does not measure, it is not a tool. Example- tongs and turners. Slicers: are used for cutting consistent thickness. Slicers measures the thickness of a slice of food product. Scales: are used to determine the weight of portions. Scoops and Spoodles: Use these to serve fruits, mashed potatoes, rice and so on. They measure different serving sizes and are numbered to differentiate the sizes such as #8(1/2 cup), #16(1/4 cup) etc. Ladles: are used for liquid-type servings of soups, gravies, sauces, stews and creamed foods. Slotted, Pierced or Perforated Spoodles: are important for serving green beans, corn, peas, stewed fruits and other foods that are prepared in liquid that you don?t want to add to the portion. Measuring Cups: are used for measuring liquid and dry goods. The metal cups are used for measuring dry goods and the glass are used for measuring liquids And remember, ? a pinch or a handful? is not a measurement!

7. Portion Control Tips Portion bulk foods into pre-portion containers Use and follow standardized recipes Use correct portioning tools and utensils Consider pre-packaged and pre-portioned foods such as low-fat or no fat salad dressings and low sodium condiments. Here are a few tips to help you control portions: Portion bulk food items according to the number of servings that come from the bulk package. Example: a #10 can of sliced peaches can be portioned into approximately 25 (? cup) souffl? cups or 4 oz. Styrofoam bowls. Standardize recipes that have been tested in your kitchen. These tested recipes will give you a specific number of servings. Once a specific or standard number of servings are determined, it will be easier to calculate the cost of each serving size. The cost of any particular item will be proportional to the quantity served. If funding is available ? and if possible - purchase pre-package foods such as low fat or no fat salad dressings and other low sodium condiments (ketchup, soy sauce) rather than allowing students to serve themselves from large containers. This is why milk and other nutrient dense items are offered in individual containers relative to pouring out of gallon jugs. (There is often very little control over the amount students will take when allowed to serve themselves from large containers) It s essential to use the correct serving tools and utensils. Let?s take a closer look at these tools. (Click to the next slide) Here are a few tips to help you control portions: Portion bulk food items according to the number of servings that come from the bulk package. Example: a #10 can of sliced peaches can be portioned into approximately 25 (? cup) souffl? cups or 4 oz. Styrofoam bowls. Standardize recipes that have been tested in your kitchen. These tested recipes will give you a specific number of servings. Once a specific or standard number of servings are determined, it will be easier to calculate the cost of each serving size. The cost of any particular item will be proportional to the quantity served. If funding is available ? and if possible - purchase pre-package foods such as low fat or no fat salad dressings and other low sodium condiments (ketchup, soy sauce) rather than allowing students to serve themselves from large containers. This is why milk and other nutrient dense items are offered in individual containers relative to pouring out of gallon jugs. (There is often very little control over the amount students will take when allowed to serve themselves from large containers) It s essential to use the correct serving tools and utensils. Let?s take a closer look at these tools. (Click to the next slide)

8. Directions: Give 3 participants a #10 can of fruit in juice or light syrup, a #8 scoop, a sheet pan, and portioning cups. (Do not tell them how many portions they should get.) Separate each participant and ask all to portion the can of fruit. Bring all three back together and count the number of servings each obtained. Ask participants the following : Compare the servings to what the Food Buying Guide gives. Critique each tray for appearance, ratio of juice to fruit in all, etc. Which cups do you think students will want? If placing these sheet pans on the serving line, which sheet pan would require the longest amount of time for students to make a selection. Directions: Give 3 participants a #10 can of fruit in juice or light syrup, a #8 scoop, a sheet pan, and portioning cups. (Do not tell them how many portions they should get.) Separate each participant and ask all to portion the can of fruit. Bring all three back together and count the number of servings each obtained. Ask participants the following : Compare the servings to what the Food Buying Guide gives. Critique each tray for appearance, ratio of juice to fruit in all, etc. Which cups do you think students will want? If placing these sheet pans on the serving line, which sheet pan would require the longest amount of time for students to make a selection.

9. Problem Solving A chef salad recipe calls for 1 ounce of cheese and 1 ounce of lean ham. During preparation the salad maker used the wrong measuring scale to weigh the ham and gave 1 ounce of cheese and 2 ounces of ham. If the ham was $2.73 per pound, what would the cost of the ham be in each scenario? Give the participants a few minutes to work it out. Time them to make it more fun and reward the person who figures the answer first. OR Work the problem out loud. Here are the steps; There are 16 ounces per pound of ham. $2.73 divided by 16 ounces = .17 per ounce The correct serving of ham would cost .17 per serving The incorrect serving of ham would double and cost .34 per serving Give the participants a few minutes to work it out. Time them to make it more fun and reward the person who figures the answer first. OR Work the problem out loud. Here are the steps; There are 16 ounces per pound of ham. $2.73 divided by 16 ounces = .17 per ounce The correct serving of ham would cost .17 per serving The incorrect serving of ham would double and cost .34 per serving

10. Problem Solving Remember, during preparation the salad maker used the incorrect scale and gave 2 ounces of ham rather than 1 ounce. 800 chef salads must be made. Using the cost per ounce calculated previously, how much would 800 salads cost using 1 ounce of ham? How much would it cost using 2 ounces of ham? Ask participants how much is 1 ounce of lean ham and how much is 2 ounces of lean ham 1 ounce is .17 X 800 chef salads = $136.00 2 ounces is .34 X 800 chef salads = $272.00 Ask participants how much is 1 ounce of lean ham and how much is 2 ounces of lean ham 1 ounce is .17 X 800 chef salads = $136.00 2 ounces is .34 X 800 chef salads = $272.00

11. Problem Solving This is only one school In a district. What if this mistake were occurring in more than one school. Do the numbers! This is only one school In a district. What if this mistake were occurring in more than one school. Do the numbers!

12. Summary Why is portion control important? How do you control portions? Provide examples of the type of portion control tools your kitchen features. Ask the participants why portion control is important. Have them share their answers. Answers: Customer Satisfaction Ensure USDA Reimbursable Meal Requirements Controls Cost Minimizes Waste Decreases Amount of Leftovers Facilitates Proper Forecasting Increases Meal Participation __________________________________________________________________________________________ Ask participants how portions can be controlled. Answers: Portion bulk food into pre-portioned containers Use and follow standardized recipes Purchase prepackaged foods, such as condiments, that are low in fat and sodium Use correct portioning tools Ask participants to name some other ways to control portions. ________________________________________________________________________________________ Ask participants to name the portion control tools used in their kitchen or that should be used. Answers: Slicers Scales Scoops and Spoodles Slotted or Pierced Spoodles Measuring Cups Summarize the presentation by saying: Good portion control is important to the over all success of a food service program. One way to control cost in today?s school meal programs is to control portion sizes. Nutrients per serving can also be negatively impacted when portions are not controlled. Calories, fat and sodium can be significantly affected and put our students at risk of childhood obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure and other such diseases. And finally, keeping our customers happy and satisfied, is key to maintaining and improving student meal participation which is our over all goal. Ask the participants why portion control is important. Have them share their answers. Answers: Customer Satisfaction Ensure USDA Reimbursable Meal Requirements Controls Cost Minimizes Waste Decreases Amount of Leftovers Facilitates Proper Forecasting Increases Meal Participation __________________________________________________________________________________________ Ask participants how portions can be controlled. Answers: Portion bulk food into pre-portioned containers Use and follow standardized recipes Purchase prepackaged foods, such as condiments, that are low in fat and sodium Use correct portioning tools Ask participants to name some other ways to control portions. ________________________________________________________________________________________ Ask participants to name the portion control tools used in their kitchen or that should be used. Answers: Slicers Scales Scoops and Spoodles Slotted or Pierced Spoodles Measuring Cups Summarize the presentation by saying: Good portion control is important to the over all success of a food service program. One way to control cost in today?s school meal programs is to control portion sizes. Nutrients per serving can also be negatively impacted when portions are not controlled. Calories, fat and sodium can be significantly affected and put our students at risk of childhood obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure and other such diseases. And finally, keeping our customers happy and satisfied, is key to maintaining and improving student meal participation which is our over all goal.

13. The National Food Service Management has a ?Basics at a Glance? poster with recipe abbreviations, equivalent volumes and weights, scoop sizes, pan size/capacity chart, cutting diagrams for portioning, and metric equivalents. This poster can be ordered free of charge by contacting the NFSMI at 1-800-321-3054 or www.nfsmi.org or http://www.olemiss.edu/depts/nfsmi/Information/Posters/basics/basics_at_a_glance.pdf The National Food Service Management has a ?Basics at a Glance? poster with recipe abbreviations, equivalent volumes and weights, scoop sizes, pan size/capacity chart, cutting diagrams for portioning, and metric equivalents. This poster can be ordered free of charge by contacting the NFSMI at 1-800-321-3054 or www.nfsmi.org or http://www.olemiss.edu/depts/nfsmi/Information/Posters/basics/basics_at_a_glance.pdf

14. Resources Healthy Schools Program - School Meals Toolkit www.healthiergeneration.org/schoolmeals Measuring Success with Standardized Recipes www.olemiss.edu/depts/nfsmi/Information/measuring-success.html Building Quality Meals: Standardize Recipes and Portion Control http://nfsmi-web01.nfsmi.olemiss.edu/ResourceOverview.aspx?ID=43 National Food Service Management Institute - Basics at a Glance www.olemiss.edu/depts/nfsmi/Information/basicsindex.html You can access more information about the Alliance Healthy Schools Program ? School Meals training criteria by clicking on www.healthiergeneration.org Click on the ?At School? tab then the ?Healthy School Builder? tab, log in using your e-mail and password or if visiting the site for the first time, log in as a new member. Once you are logged in, click on school meals and then click on ?toolkit?. Go to the table of contents and click on Bronze and browse down to page 10. Most of the materials (posters and handouts) can be ordered or downloaded from the above links free of charge. You can access more information about the Alliance Healthy Schools Program ? School Meals training criteria by clicking on www.healthiergeneration.org Click on the ?At School? tab then the ?Healthy School Builder? tab, log in using your e-mail and password or if visiting the site for the first time, log in as a new member. Once you are logged in, click on school meals and then click on ?toolkit?. Go to the table of contents and click on Bronze and browse down to page 10. Most of the materials (posters and handouts) can be ordered or downloaded from the above links free of charge.

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