Study orientation for international postgraduate taught students
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Study Orientation for International Postgraduate Taught Students. Sue Rigby Assistant Principal University of Edinburgh. Welcome to the University and to this Orientation day. Introduction content More welcomes People running the programme Context The Challenge Plan for session. Who we are.

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Study Orientation for International Postgraduate Taught Students

Sue Rigby

Assistant Principal

University of Edinburgh


Welcome to the University and to this Orientation day


Introduction contentMore welcomesPeople running the programmeContextThe ChallengePlan for session


Who we are


Programme context:Scotland and Edinburgh


Top 10 best City in the World

Voted by Wanderlust readers, 2008

Voted Best place to live in the UK

YouGov Poll of 10,000 UK residents, 2009

“Edinburgh isn’t so much a city, more a way of life ... I doubt I’ll ever tire of exploring Edinburgh, on foot or in print.”

Ian Rankin, bestselling crime writer andalumnus of the University of Edinburgh


Programme context:Edinburgh University


We are consistently ranked one of the top 50 universities in the world*

* THES – QS Ranking

96% of our disciplines have research that is world leading*

* 2008 UK-wide Research Assessment Exercise


Sharing our Global Vision with

China.

France.

Germany.

Australia.

Switzerland.

Norway.

India.

Belgium.

Mexico.

America.

Africa.

Japan.

Austria.

Fiji.

Pakistan.

We are also part of the Russell Group which represents 20 of UK’s leading Universities.

It is similar to US’s Ivy League group of Universities and Australia’s Group of Eight.


Influencing the world since 1583


Our role in shaping the modern world

“One scientific epoch ended and another began with James Clerk Maxwell … the special theory of relativity owes its origins to Maxwell’s equations of the electromagnetic field.”

Albert Einstein, physicist and philosopher


Masters study in Edinburgh

Short timescale

High expectations

High aspirations

Large investment

Lots to do, not just work

-How to succeed and make the most of your studies?


Your blueprint for success –

assessment and feedback


Your expectations

Vocational or research masters?

Costly – should have value to you in future

Should give you specific and generic skills

PTES highlights challenges – confidence in new settings, transkills, career support – we are working on these, so must you…..


Your School

Provides teaching, but you may also take courses from other Schools or Colleges

Provides advice and administrative support for your Programme

Sets and marks your exams

Through the Board of Examiners ratifies your degree award


The academic year 2010/11


Taught component of masters

Two taught semesters

Most courses assessed by course work and exam

Must pass first time, you should check your local progression rules to see if you can continue with the Masters if you fail any elements of a course.


Common marking scheme


Feedback

How to do better next time – must be timely and forward looking

Comes from Programme Director,

Lecturers, Demonstrators

Make sure they do this!

Can come from Peers

Audit yourself – how to do this….


Dissertation

Research dissertation over the Summer

Prepare for this early

Talk to staff, use personal contacts

Make sure you get on with your Supervisor

Make sure you are clear about what is required from you

Nag, bully, be persistent in getting the help you may need


Where next?


ACTIVE LEARNING

Tony Lynch

English Language Teaching Centre


Expectations of PGs


LECTURES


What are lectures for?

  • One local view:

    “I don’t want just to hear my voice. What I really want is to hear students who are willing to question and challenge me, and take the debate forward”.


  • An alternative view:

  • “Being quiet in class, listening carefully and taking precise notes are regarded as traits of a good student”


Decisions in note-making

  • What the lecturer has said

  • What it means

  • Whether it’s important enough to go into your notes

  • How to note it down efficiently


Is a point important?

A critical attitude:

  • Analysing

  • Evaluating

  • Applying if relevant


Lecturing styles

  • Reading (more formal language)

  • Conversational (more informal)

  • Multi-modal (speech, writing, image, and body language - SWIBL)


Active = Interactive

  • Interaction inside your head: KEL

    KNOWLEDGE

    EXPERIENCE

    LECTURER’S WORDS

  • Interaction with other people

    LECTURER

    STUDENTS


Lecturers’ language

  • Markers of importance

  • Markers of topic change

    DIGRESSION and RETURN

  • Markers of summary / conclusion

  • But relatively informal speech

    (so conversation practice helps)


Markers of importance

  • Central / key / core / vital

  • Stress / underline / highlight

  • What this boils down to is…

  • The crux of the matter is…

  • The $64,000 question is…


Markers of topic change

  • Having looked at X, let’s turn to Y

  • I’d like now to move on to …

  • Incidentally / By the way / While I think of it… = DIGRESSION

  • Anyway … / As I was saying …

    = RETURN


Markers of summary / conclusion

  • To sum up / In conclusion

  • What does all this mean?

  • At the end of the day…

  • For my money…

  • In a nutshell…


SEMINARS


What are they for?

The local view:

  • Exploration

  • Exchange

  • Participation

    An alternative view:

    “We just talk”


What can go wrong?

  • “It was a disaster. They hadn’t done the reading. Nobody wanted to say anything, so I thought we might as well finish early”


Stages in participation

  • Understanding

  • Processing

  • Forming a response to the speaker’s point

  • Producing that response

  • Listening to the next speaker

  • (Understanding, etc.)


Sources of difficulty

  • Not understanding the previous speaker(s)

  • Not having anything to say

  • Having something to say, but not working out your response in time


Improving your understanding

  • Listen to a range of accents

  • Listen to discussions

  • Listen in on others’ conversations


Improving your speaking

  • For fluency - talk (to yourself, if necessary) in English

  • For conciseness : the 4-3-2 technique


Asking questions


“Any questions?”

  • Complex relationship

  • Threat to ‘face’:

    - for the person asking

    - for the person asked

    Intercultural differences


An Indonesian example

TL: Any questions?

S: No questions.

TL: What about the others?

S: They have no questions, either.

TL: How do you know they don’t have any questions?

S: Because...


... you are a good teacher.


Replies to requests

  • I’ll see what I can do

  • I’ll do my best

  • I’ll do what I can

  • You’re not asking much, are you?

  • Send me an email


Ask…

… the right question

… of the relevant person

… at the appropriate time


Time Management


What will be the two biggest time management challenges that you face this year?

Please write them down


General advice

  • Understand yourself:

    • How and when do you work best?

    • What are your bad habits?

    • Rewards and targets

  • Maintain a healthy work/life balance:

    • Stay healthy

    • Don’t get over-tired

    • Pace yourself


On-course

  • Managing your workload: Be prepared

  • Quality of work: Compromise

  • Task prioritisation: Assignments

  • Using feedback

  • You and your co-students are a brilliant resource for one another


Dissertation Projects: planning & management

  • Have a plan! : the process is significantly aided by clear project design

  • Research problemspecific questionsmethods and implementation

  • Accept the need for flexibility

  • Set intermediate targets and short term goals & deadlines

  • Discuss with supervisor(s)


Write down two examples of effective time management that you will try to follow this yearwww.ed.ac.uk/iad/postgraduates


Reading and Writing Effectively

Tony Lynch

English Language Teaching Centre


Reading effectively

Economically

Strategically

Selectively


Everyone’s problems

size of reading lists

making time to do the reading


Strategies

Look for clues on priorities

Decide your own priorities

Structure your reading

SQRRR (SQ3R)


SQRRR

Survey (sample, skim)

Question

Read

Recall

Review


Advice on effective reading

www.uefap.com

→ Links

→ Skills

→ Reading

→ Effective reading


Writing Effectively

Key elements in academic writing:

APPROPRIACY (STYLE)

ACCURACY

CARE with REFERENCES


Appropriacy

  • ‘Style’ = vocabulary > grammar

  • Use your reading to extend your stock of words and expressions

  • Make a note of those you find useful

  • Use them in your draft

  • If in doubt, google for them


Accuracy

Importance of writing “cycles”:

Rough plan

Reading and note-making

Outline

First draft

Revision

Second draft etc…


Revision

  • “The difference between successful and unsuccessful writers is that the successful ones revise more often”.

  • Final revision

    Editing

    Spellchecking

    Proofreading


Acknowledging your sources

The five Cs:

Care

Consistency

Completeness

Correctness

eConomy


Care

If you note down all the details of your sources when you do your reading, this takes care of itself.

It also means you save time when you are finalising your essay.


Consistency

Ask your Programme Director if there is a programme ‘stylesheet’ for the presentation of References.

If not, analyse and follow the system used in one of the journals you are recommended to read.


Completeness

ALL the sources you have used

ALL the details required for the types of source you are using:

book

journal article

chapter in an edited collection, etc.


Correctness

Make sure you get right:

  • Spelling of authors’ names and technical terms in your field

  • Surname versus first name

  • Order of presentation in your References (alphabetical order, chronological order, etc.)


eConomy

Brown, G. (2009) “The value of the semi-colon in academic writing”. Journal of Pedantry, volume56, issue 3, pages200-214.

Brown G. 2009. The value of the semi-colon in academic writing. Journal of Pedantry 56/3: 200-214.


Guidance on academic writing

www.uefap.com

→ Links

→ Skills

→ Writing


Your blueprint for success –

assessment and feedback


Your expectations

Vocational or research masters?

Costly – should have value to you in future

Should give you specific and generic skills

PTES highlights challenges – confidence in new settings, transkills, career support – we are working on these, so must you…..


Your School

Provides teaching, but you may also take courses from other Schools or Colleges

Provides advice and administrative support for your Programme

Sets and marks your exams

Through the Board of Examiners ratifies your degree award


The academic year 2010/11


Taught component of masters

Two taught semesters

Most courses assessed by course work and exam

Must pass first time, you should check your local progression rules to see if you can continue with the Masters if you fail any elements of a course.


Common marking scheme


Feedback

How to do better next time – must be timely and forward looking

Comes from Programme Director,

Lecturers, Demonstrators

Make sure they do this!

Can come from Peers

Audit yourself – how to do this….


Dissertation

Research dissertation over the Summer

Prepare for this early

Talk to staff, use personal contacts

Make sure you get on with your Supervisor

Make sure you are clear about what is required from you

Nag, bully, be persistent in getting the help you may need


Where next?


UNDERSTANDING LOCALS and MAKING YOURSELF UNDERSTOOD

Tony Lynch

English Language Teaching Centre


(Video clip)


Comprehension

isactive

exploits linguistic input, context, and the listener’s background knowledge

involves looking for reasonable interpretations of input


Extract from a radio interview


  • sex bender

  • six bender

  • sick spender

  • suspender

  • sex spender


Six-bender?


Ballyregan Bob


Input: British accents

(1955)

What ear jar ye?

High yoldar ye?

Aim seven


Accents

There is no Scottish accent


There are lots of Scottish accents!

Main ones are: Edinburgh, Glasgow, Borders, Galloway, Dundee, Aberdeen, Highland, Western Isles, Orkney, and Shetland


Good news about Scottish accents

partpath

S England /pαt//pαФ/

N England/pat//pæФ/

Scotland /paRt//pæФ/


Practical tips

Listen to Radio Scotland news:

Newsreader (written English, slight accent)

Reporters (spoken from notes, stronger accent)

Interviewees (spontaneous, accent/dialect)


Dialect words

Listen out for:

-nae instead of –n’t (“cannae”, “didnae”)

“wee” for small

“stay” for live (“where do you stay?”)

“will” for shall

“that’s me” = I’ve finished


Tips for speaking practice

TANDEM (EUSA)

Talk to shop assistants, lab technicians, servitors

Listen out for feedback from people listening to you


PROFILE (book)

Principles, Resources and Options for the Independent Learner of English

Kenneth Anderson & Tony Lynch

Available for £5 from:

English Language Teaching Centre

21 Hill Place


That’s me


University of Edinburgh

Help

Advice

and

Resources

Kim Pearson and Johanna Holtan


University of Edinburgh

Ongoing visa and immigration advice and services with trained advisors

Police registration


University of Edinburgh

Information Events

Working after Studies

Preparing to go home


University of Edinburgh

University Sources of Help

Careers Service

Counselling Service

Student Disability Service

University Health Centre


University of Edinburgh

Other Resources

Online Study Skills Support at the IAD -http://www.ed.ac.uk/schools-departments/institute-academic-development

Also: courses offered by

English Language Teaching Centre

Institute for Academic Development

EUSA


Edinburgh University Students’ Association

The Advice Place


Edinburgh University Students’ Association


Edinburgh University Students’ Association

Best resource?

University staff and other Students…………..


University of Edinburgh

16th September 2011

Sandra Morris, International Office

Johanna Holtan, EUSA


Edinburgh University Students’ Association

Student Life

Freshers’ Week

Clubs and Societies

Sports Facilities

Volunteering

Events Programme

Go Global

PG Representation

Tandem Language Exchange


Edinburgh University Students’ Association

The International Student Centre (ISC)

The ISC is run by students for students.

Trips

Social events

Coffee evenings

Pub Nights

Facebook: “International Student Centre Edinburgh”

Web:www.isced.blogspot.com


Edinburgh University Students’ Association

The International Student Centre (ISC)

Friday 16th September

@ 13.00 and 16.00

Historical Tour of Edinburgh

Meet outside Teviot Debating Hall

Saturday 17th September

All day – trip to St Andrews

Tickets: £8.00


University of Edinburgh

Some examples of events last year

Trip to Stirling

Trip to Culzean Castle

Trip to Lindisfarne

Trip to Bamburgh Castle

Trip to Loch Katrine

Trip to Whisky Distillery

Web:www.isced.blogspot.com


University of Edinburgh

The University’s Hospitality Scheme

All new international and EU students can apply.

Hosts include staff of the university, alumni, friends of the university, students.

Applications for the Hospitality Scheme for 2011 academic year will open shortly.


University of Edinburgh

Some useful websites and places to go

theOracle.co.uk

( Google “free things to do in Edinburgh”)

Edinburgh.Gumtree.com

For furniture, electrical items, accommodation

Charity Shops

For clothes


University of Edinburgh

5 Things you MUST do while you are in Edinburgh!!!

You must climb Arthur’s Seat

You must attend at least one ceilidh

You must eat haggis (at least once!)

You must visit a castle

You must visit another part of Scotland

(for instance catch a train to North Berwick)


University of Edinburgh

All good people agree, And all good people say,All nice people, like us, are WeAnd everyone else is They:But if you cross over the sea,Instead of over the way,You may end by looking on WeAs only a sort of They!

From We and They“, Rudyard Kipling


University of Edinburgh

Enjoy your Studies! Enjoy Edinburgh!


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