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Beginning-of-Year Administration: Reminders & Updates. TPRI 2010-2014. Contents. Slide 3When to Administer BOY Slides 4 – 6 Kindergarten Slides 7 – 16 Grade 1 Slides 17 – 27 Grade 2 Slides 28 – 38 Grade 3 Slide 39PMER Slide 40PMBR Slide 41Contact Information.

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Beginning of year administration reminders updates

Beginning-of-Year Administration: Reminders & Updates

TPRI 2010-2014


Contents

Contents

Slide 3When to Administer BOY

Slides 4 – 6 Kindergarten

Slides 7 – 16 Grade 1

Slides 17 – 27 Grade 2

Slides 28 – 38 Grade 3

Slide 39PMER

Slide 40PMBR

Slide 41Contact Information


When to administer boy

When to Administer BOY

  • For Kindergarten, TPRI recommends BOY administration begin six weeks after the start of the school year.

  • For Grades 1, 2 and 3, TPRI recommends BOY administration begin two weeks after the start of the school year.

  • Individual schools and school districts set the specific dates for their TPRI administration window to open and close.

  • TPRI recommends an administration window of 2 weeks or less.


Kindergarten boy reminders

Kindergarten BOY Reminders

Screening Section

  • The purpose of the Screening Section is to predict for teachers which of their students may need additional or intensive reading instruction in order to meet their grade level goals.

  • At BOY teachers should complete the Screening Section with all students in the class.

  • The Screening Section at BOY includes two tasks:

    - SCR-1 Letter Sound

    - SCR-2 Blending Onset-Rimes and Phonemes

  • After the Screening Section, teachers should follow the Branching Rules to determine which tasks on the Inventory Section of the TPRI a student should complete.


Kindergarten boy reminders1

Kindergarten BOY Reminders

Inventory Section

  • The purpose of the Inventory Section is to allow teachers to acquire more data to help match reading instruction with specific student needs. It is not expected that students will be able to complete all of the TPRI tasks successfully at the beginning of the year.

  • If students scored Developed (D) on the Screening Section, then skip to the Listening Comprehension portion of the Inventory. Students who scored Still Developing (SD) on the screening should begin with

    BPA–1 or PA-1.

  • The Book and Print Awareness task (BPA-1) is optional.

  • Follow the Branching Rules when a student scores Still Developing (SD) on a task in the PA and GK portions of the inventory.

  • All students should complete the Listening Comprehension portion of the inventory.


Boy kindergarten listening comprehension

BOY – Kindergarten Listening Comprehension

  • The Listening Comprehension task at BOY is COM-BOY.

  • This task is administered to all students.

  • The BOY story is The Day the Prince Lost His Tooth.

  • Ask the comprehension questions listed on the Student Record Sheet.

  • Score 1 for correct and 0 for incorrect. Do not give ½ points.

  • Sample answers are provided, but rely on your professional judgment in scoring responses as correct or incorrect.


Grade 1 boy reminders

Grade 1 BOY Reminders

Screening Section

  • The purpose of the Screening Section is to predict for teachers which of their students may need additional or intensive reading instruction in order to meet their grade level goals.

  • At BOY teachers should complete the Screening Section with all students in the class.

  • The Screening Section at BOY includes three tasks:

    - SCR-1 Letter Sound

    - SCR-2 Word Reading

    - SCR-3 Blending Phonemes

  • After the Screening Section, teachers should follow the Branching Rules to determine which tasks on the Inventory Section of the TPRI a student should complete.


Grade 1 boy reminders1

Grade 1 BOY Reminders

Inventory Section

  • The purpose of the Inventory Section is to allow teachers to acquire more data to help match reading instruction with specific student needs. It is not expected that students will be able to complete all of the TPRI tasks successfully at the beginning of the year.

  • If students scored Developed (D) on the Screening Section then skip to the Word Reading portion of the Inventory. Students who scored Still Developing (SD) on the Screening Section should begin with

    PA-1.

  • Follow the Branching Rules when a student scores Still Developing (SD) on a task in the PA, GK or Word Reading portions of the inventory.

  • All students take the Word Reading and the Reading Accuracy, Fluency and Comprehension portions of the Inventory Section.


Scoring the word reading task

Scoring the Word Reading Task

  • Score words as correct (1) or incorrect (0).

  • For instructional planning, record incorrect responses as the student reads each word.

    • Use phonetic spelling that will later allow you to recall the answer the student provided.

  • The Error Analysis Chart helps understand specific word decoding confusion.

    • Do not complete the Error Analysis Chart while you are with the student.

    • Complete the Error Analysis Chart for students to whom you will provide targeted GK instruction.


Boy grade 1 reading accuracy fluency comprehension

BOY – Grade 1 Reading Accuracy, Fluency & Comprehension

  • The Reading Accuracy, Fluency & Comprehension task at BOY is READ-BOY.

  • This portion is administered to all students.

  • The BOY stories are:

    • Story 1 – Tut

    • Story 2 – Baseball Game

  • All students attempt to read both stories. If the student reaches the frustrational level on a story, then read the story to the student.


Correct story reading administration scoring

Correct Story Reading Administration & Scoring

  • SAY: I’m going to ask you to read a story.  The title of the story is _____________.  After you read it, I’ll ask you a few questions.  Read the story out loud to me.

  • DO:  Place the Story Booklet in front of the student.  Start the stopwatch when the student reads the first word of the story.  As the student reads, mark errors on the Student Record Sheet. 

  • Mark any words not read correctly with a slash ( / ) on the Student Record Sheet.

  • Story readingerrors include:

    • Mispronunciations – The student pronounces the word incorrectly.  This includes leaving off –s, –ed and –ing endings.

    • Substitutions – The student replaces the correct word with a different word.

    • Omissions – The student skips a word.

    • Reversals – The student reads adjacent words in the wrong order.

    • Hesitations – The student pauses for longer than 3 seconds or takes longer than 3 seconds to sound out a word.  In these cases,  provide the word and count it as an error. 

  • Items not considered errors:

    • Insertions – The student adds a whole word that does not appear in the text.

    • Self-corrections – The student makes an error, but then corrects the error.

    • Repetitions – The student reads the same word or phrase multiple times.

    • Loss of place – The student skips a line or loses their place. Redirect the student to the correct place in the story and allow the stopwatch to continue to run.

  • If the student reads the same word incorrectly multiple times throughout a story, count the word as an error each time it is read incorrectly.  All words, including names, are scored in the same way.


Determining fluency rates using the fluency equating tables

Determining Fluency Rates Using the Fluency Equating Tables

  • TPRI provides tools to help teachers measure and understand fluency scores more effectively. These tools come in the form of Fluency Equating Tables which equate fluency performance on any story with the hardest End-of-Year story (Story 6).

  • For more information and to download the Fluency Equating Table for your grade level, go to:

    http://www.tpri.org/resources/fluency-equating-tables.html


Determining average fluency rates

Determining Average Fluency Rates

  • Average fluency rates for the two BOY stories (Story 1 & Story 2) can be used for reporting, grouping students and/or for planning instruction.

  • TPRI recommends that average fluency rates be calculated using the equated fluency score for each story the student reads at the instructional or independent level.

  • If the student is able to read both stories at the instructional or independent level, then the average fluency rate is determined using this formula:

    (Story 1 rate + Story 2 rate) ÷ 2 = Avg. rate


Determining average fluency rates when students reach frustration

Determining Average Fluency Rates When Students Reach Frustration

  • If a student scores at the frustrational level on a story, do not calculate a fluency rate for that story.

  • Students who reach frustration on both Story 1 & 2 will not have an average fluency rate.

  • If the student is only able to read one story at instructional or independent level, TPRI recommends that teachers record the equated fluency rate for that one story as the student’s average fluency score.


Boy grade 1 reading comprehension

BOY – Grade 1 Reading Comprehension

  • Ask the comprehension questions listed on the Student Record Sheet.

  • Score 1 for correct and 0 for incorrect. Do not give ½ points.

  • Sample answers are provided, but rely on your professional judgment in scoring responses as correct or incorrect.


Scoring developed d for reading comprehension

Scoring Developed (D) for Reading Comprehension

  • Students who listen to a story after reaching frustration cannot score D for Reading Comprehension.

  • On an individual story, students can score D for Reading Comprehension by answering 5-6 questions correctly, but there is not an overall D criteria for Reading Comprehension.

  • To consider students' comprehension scores in relation to each other (when grouping students, for example), there are two common and efficient approaches.

    • Look at whether students scored D on both stories, 1 story or 0 stories.

    • Look at the total number of comprehension questions that students answered correctly for both stories.


Grade 2 boy reminders

Grade 2 BOY Reminders

Screening Section

  • The purpose of the Screening Section is to predict for teachers which of their students may need additional or intensive reading instruction in order to meet their grade level goals.

  • At BOY teachers should complete the Screening Section with all students in the class.

  • The Screening Section at BOY includes one task:

    - SCR-1 Word Reading

  • After the Screening Section, the teacher should administer all tasks of the Inventory Section.


Grade 2 boy reminders1

Grade 2 BOY Reminders

Inventory Section

  • The purpose of the Inventory Section is to allow teachers to acquire more data to help match reading instruction with specific student needs. It is not expected that students will be able to complete all of the TPRI tasks successfully at the beginning of the year.

  • All students take the Spelling, Word Reading and the Reading Accuracy, Fluency and Comprehension portions of the Inventory Section.


Grade 2 boy spelling task

Grade 2 BOY Spelling Task

  • The spelling task may be administered to the whole class at once, in small groups or individually.

  • Carefully follow the script in the Teacher’s Guide.

  • Score words as correct (1) or incorrect (0).

  • The Error Analysis Chart helps understand specific spelling confusion and will help to guide instruction.


Scoring the word reading task1

Scoring the Word Reading Task

  • Score words as correct (1) or incorrect (0).

  • Follow the Branching Rules if a student scores 0 on Set 1.

  • For instructional planning, record incorrect responses as the student reads each word.

    • Use phonetic spelling that will allow you to recall the answer the student provided.

  • The Error Analysis Chart helps understand specific word decoding confusion.

    • Do not complete the Error Analysis Chart while you are with the student.

    • Complete the Error Analysis Chart for students to whom you will provide targeted GK instruction.


Boy grade 2 reading accuracy fluency comprehension

BOY – Grade 2 Reading Accuracy, Fluency & Comprehension

  • The Reading Accuracy, Fluency & Comprehension task at BOY is READ-BOY.

  • This portion is administered to all students.

  • The BOY stories are:

    • Story 1 – Rosa’s New Friend

    • Story 2 – Skateboard!

  • All students attempt to read both stories. If the student reaches the frustrational level on a story, then read the story to the student.


Correct story reading administration scoring1

Correct Story Reading Administration & Scoring

  • SAY: I’m going to ask you to read a story.  The title of the story is _____________.  After you read it, I’ll ask you a few questions.  Read the story out loud to me.

  • DO:  Place the Story Booklet in front of the student.  Start the stopwatch when the student reads the first word of the story.  As the student reads, mark errors on the Student Record Sheet. 

  • Mark any words not read correctly with a slash ( / ) on the Student Record Sheet.

  • Story readingerrors include:

    • Mispronunciations – The student pronounces the word incorrectly.  This includes leaving off –s, –ed and –ing endings.

    • Substitutions – The student replaces the correct word with a different word.

    • Omissions – The student skips a word.

    • Reversals – The student reads adjacent words in the wrong order.

    • Hesitations – The student pauses for longer than 3 seconds or takes longer than 3 seconds to sound out a word.  In these cases,  provide the word and count it as an error. 

  • Items not considered errors:

    • Insertions – The student adds a whole word that does not appear in the text.

    • Self-corrections – The student makes an error, but then corrects the error.

    • Repetitions – The student reads the same word or phrase multiple times.

    • Loss of place – The student skips a line or loses their place. Redirect the student to the correct place in the story and allow the stopwatch to continue to run.

  • If the student reads the same word incorrectly multiple times throughout a story, count the word as an error each time it is read incorrectly.  All words, including names, are scored in the same way.


Determining fluency rates using the fluency equating tables1

Determining Fluency Rates Using the Fluency Equating Tables

  • TPRI now provides tools to help teachers measure and understand fluency scores more effectively. These tools come in the form of Fluency Equating Tables which equate fluency performance on any story with the hardest End-of-Year story (Story 6).

  • For more information or to download the Fluency Equating Table for your grade level, go to:

    http://www.tpri.org/resources/fluency-equating-tables.html


Determining average fluency rates1

Determining Average Fluency Rates

  • Average fluency rates for the two BOY stories (Story 1 & Story 2) can be used for reporting, grouping students and/or for planning instruction.

  • TPRI recommends that average fluency rates be calculated using the equated fluency score for each story the student reads at the instructional or independent level.

  • If the student is able to read both stories at the instructional or independent level, then the average fluency rate is determined using this formula:

    (Story 1 rate + Story 2 rate) ÷ 2 = Avg. rate


Determining average fluency rates when students reach frustration1

Determining Average Fluency Rates When Students Reach Frustration

  • If a student scores at the frustrational level on a story, do not calculate a fluency rate for that story.

  • Students who reach frustration on both Story 1 & 2 will not have an average fluency rate.

  • If the student is only able to read one story at instructional or independent level, TPRI recommends that teachers record the equated fluency rate for that one story as the student’s average fluency score.


Boy grade 2 reading comprehension

BOY – Grade 2 Reading Comprehension

  • Ask the comprehension questions listed on the Student Record Sheet.

  • Score 1 for correct and 0 for incorrect. Do not give ½ points.

  • Sample answers are provided, but rely on your professional judgment in scoring responses as correct or incorrect.


Scoring developed d for reading comprehension1

Scoring Developed (D) for Reading Comprehension

  • Students who listen to a story after reaching frustration cannot score D for Reading Comprehension.

  • On an individual story, students can score D for Reading Comprehension by answering 5-6 questions correctly, but there is not an overall D criteria for Reading Comprehension.

  • To consider students' comprehension scores in relation to each other (when grouping students, for example), there are two common and efficient approaches.

    • Look at whether students scored D on both stories, 1 story or 0 stories.

    • Look at the total number of comprehension questions that students answered correctly for both stories.


Grade 3 boy reminders

Grade 3 BOY Reminders

Screening Section

  • The purpose of the Screening Section is to predict for teachers which of their students may need additional or intensive reading instruction in order to meet their grade level goals.

  • At BOY teachers should complete the Screening Section with all students in the class.

  • The Screening Section at BOY includes one task:

    - SCR-1 Word Reading

  • After the Screening Section, the teacher should administer all tasks on the Inventory Section.


Grade 3 boy reminders1

Grade 3 BOY Reminders

Inventory Section

  • The purpose of the Inventory Section is to allow teachers to acquire more data to help match reading instruction with specific student needs. It is not expected that students will be able to complete all of the TPRI tasks successfully at the beginning of the year.

  • All students take the Spelling, Word Reading and the Reading Accuracy, Fluency and Comprehension portions of the Inventory Section.


Grade 3 boy spelling task

Grade 3 BOY Spelling Task

  • The spelling task may be administered to the whole class at once, in small groups or individually.

  • Carefully follow the script in the Teacher’s Guide.

  • Score words as correct (1) or incorrect (0).

  • The Error Analysis Chart helps understand specific spelling confusion and will help to guide instruction.


Scoring the word reading task2

Scoring the Word Reading Task

  • Score words as correct (1) or incorrect (0).

  • Follow the Branching Rules if a student scores 0 on Set 1.

  • For instructional planning, record incorrect responses as the student reads each word.

    • Use phonetic spelling that will allow you to recall the answer the student provided.

  • The Error Analysis Chart helps understand specific word decoding confusion.

    • Do not complete the Error Analysis Chart while you are with the student.

    • Complete the Error Analysis Chart for students to whom you will provide targeted GK instruction.


Boy grade 3 reading accuracy fluency comprehension

BOY – Grade 3 Reading Accuracy, Fluency & Comprehension

  • The Reading Accuracy, Fluency & Comprehension task at BOY is READ-BOY.

  • This portion is administered to all students.

  • The BOY stories are:

    • Story 1 – A Bully at School

    • Story 2 – Getting the Vote

  • All students attempt to read both stories. If the student reaches the frustrational level on a story, then read the story to the student.


Correct story reading administration scoring2

Correct Story Reading Administration & Scoring

  • SAY: I’m going to ask you to read a story.  The title of the story is _____________.  After you read it, I’ll ask you a few questions.  Read the story out loud to me.

  • DO:  Place the Story Booklet in front of the student.  Start the stopwatch when the student reads the first word of the story.  As the student reads, mark errors on the Student Record Sheet. 

  • Mark any words not read correctly with a slash ( / ) on the Student Record Sheet.

  • Story readingerrors include:

    • Mispronunciations – The student pronounces the word incorrectly.  This includes leaving off –s, –ed and –ing endings.

    • Substitutions – The student replaces the correct word with a different word.

    • Omissions – The student skips a word.

    • Reversals – The student reads adjacent words in the wrong order.

    • Hesitations – The student pauses for longer than 3 seconds or takes longer than 3 seconds to sound out a word.  In these cases,  provide the word and count it as an error. 

  • Items not considered errors:

    • Insertions – The student adds a whole word that does not appear in the text.

    • Self-corrections – The student makes an error, but then corrects the error.

    • Repetitions – The student reads the same word or phrase multiple times.

    • Loss of place – The student skips a line or loses their place. Redirect the student to the correct place in the story and allow the stopwatch to continue to run.

  • If the student reads the same word incorrectly multiple times throughout a story, count the word as an error each time it is read incorrectly.  All words, including names, are scored in the same way.


Determining fluency rates using the fluency equating tables2

Determining Fluency Rates Using the Fluency Equating Tables

  • TPRI now provides tools to help teachers measure and understand fluency scores more effectively. These tools come in the form of Fluency Equating Tables which equate fluency performance on any story with the hardest End-of-Year story (Story 6).

  • For more information or to download the Fluency Equating Table for your grade level, go to:

    http://www.tpri.org/resources/fluency-equating-tables.html


Determining average fluency rates2

Determining Average Fluency Rates

  • Average fluency rates for the two BOY stories (Story 1 & Story 2) can be used for reporting, grouping students and/or for planning instruction.

  • TPRI recommends that average fluency rates be calculated using the equated fluency score for each story the student reads at the instructional or independent level.

  • If the student is able to read both stories at the instructional or independent level, then the average fluency rate is determined using this formula:

    (Story 1 rate + Story 2 rate) ÷ 2 = Avg. rate


Determining average fluency rates when students reach frustration2

Determining Average Fluency Rates When Students Reach Frustration

  • If a student scores at the frustrational level on a story, do not calculate a fluency rate for that story.

  • Students who reach frustration on both Story 1 & 2 will not have an average fluency rate.

  • If the student is only able to read one story at instructional or independent level, TPRI recommends that teachers record the equated fluency rate for that one story as the student’s average fluency score.


Boy grade 3 reading comprehension

BOY – Grade 3 Reading Comprehension

  • Ask the comprehension questions listed on the Student Record Sheet.

  • Score 1 for correct and 0 for incorrect. Do not give ½ points.

  • Sample answers are provided, but rely on your professional judgment in scoring responses as correct or incorrect.


Scoring developed d for reading comprehension2

Scoring Developed (D) for Reading Comprehension

  • Students who listen to a story after reaching frustration cannot score D for Reading Comprehension.

  • On an individual story, students can score D for Reading Comprehension by answering 5-6 questions correctly, but there is not an overall D criteria for Reading Comprehension.

  • To consider students' comprehension scores in relation to each other (when grouping students, for example), there are two common and efficient approaches.

    • Look at whether students scored D on both stories, 1 story or 0 stories.

    • Look at the total number of comprehension questions that students answered correctly for both stories.


Using the pmer after boy

Using the PMER After BOY

  • Kindergarten and Grade 1

    • The PMER is typically used with students who are receiving intervention to facilitate more regular checks of their progress.

    • Two weeks after the BOY Benchmark Assessment begin with Set 2 and continue every two weeks in sequence.

    • At MOY reevaluate student progress and determine whether to continue monitoring progress and/or whether Grade 1 students can begin to be assessed with the PMBR.


Using the pmbr after boy

Using the PMBR after BOY

  • The PMBR is typically used with students who are receiving intervention to facilitate more regular checks of their progress.

  • 2-Week Schedule

    • Start with Story 1 for the student’s grade level. Move back to Story 1 for the previous grade if the student is frustrated.

  • 6-Week Schedule

    • Use the timed word list to place the student into a story.

    • If the student is frustrated, back up to the previous story.

    • If the student is frustrated on Story 1 for their grade level, use their word list score to place into a story for the previous grade level.


Questions

Questions?

If you have any questions, please contact us at:

[email protected]

OR

Check the Frequently Asked Questions section of the website:

http://www.tpri.org/faqs/index.html


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