Low stakes writing for fun fluency
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Low Stakes Writing for Fun & Fluency. Heidi Fridriksson Brunei-US English Language Fellow, National Institute of Education in Cambodia. Overview. Definition of low stakes writing Why use low stakes writing? Common teacher concerns Low stakes writing tools.

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Low Stakes Writing for Fun & Fluency

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Low Stakes Writing for Fun & Fluency

Heidi Fridriksson

Brunei-US English Language Fellow,

National Institute of Education in Cambodia


Overview

  • Definition of low stakes writing

  • Why use low stakes writing?

  • Common teacher concerns

  • Low stakes writing tools


What exactly is low stakes writing?


What exactly is low stakes writing?

Low Stakes High Stakes

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Freewrite Blog Book Review Research Paper

Journal Email to Teacher Argument Essay Exam


Why low stakes writing?


Low stakes writingdevelops fluency & enhances engagement


Low stakes writing reducesanxiety“a safe place to try out new language, to experiment”-Williams, 2008


Low stakes writing allows students to personalize their writing & find their voice in English


Common Concerns


Common Concerns

  • Assessment


Common Concerns

  • Assessment

  • Time (in the term)


Common Concerns

  • Assessment

  • Time (in the term)

  • Time (in the day)


Common Concerns

  • Assessment

  • Time (in the term)

  • Time (in the day)

  • Variety


Common Concerns

  • Assessment

  • Time (in the term)

  • Time (in the day)

  • Variety

  • Level


Think Pair Share

Low stakes writing to prepare ideas


  • Think: Ss write for a short time (2-5 min usually) on a topic

  • Pair: Ss share what they wrote with a partner

  • Share: Ss share answers with the full class


Try It!

Think / Pair / Share

Have you ever used low stakes writing in your teaching? What kind of low stakes writing tools did you use?


Picture Composition

Low stakes writing for mixed ability groups


  • Students look carefully at the picture

  • Teacher pre-teaches vocab and asks WH questions to give them ideas

  • High students can write a whole story; low students can write just a few words


Multi-Entry Journals

Low stakes writing as conversation with text


Try It!


Dialogue Journals

Low stakes writing as conversation with

teachers and classmates


Try It!

-Write one idea from my presentation

-Respond to that idea

-Pass your paper to a peer

-Read and respond to your peer’s thoughts

-Pass the paper back to them


Application

  • Which of these activities do you think would work best for your future teaching context? Do you have any LSW tools to share?


Questions?


REFERENCES

Alexie, Sherman. The joys of reading and writing: Superman & me. In Dorris, M. & Buchwalk, E. (Eds.), The most wonderful books : Writers on discovering the pleasures of reading. Minneapolis, MN: Milkweed Editions.

Bartholomae, D. & Petrosky, A.R. (1986). Facts, artifacts and counterfacts: Theory and method for a reading and writing course. Portsmouth: Boyton/Cook Publishers.

Bauer, L. & Sweeney, L. (1999). The use of literary letters with post-secondary non-native students. Learning Assistance Review, 4 (1), 33-41.

Blanton, L. (2008). Speaking of absence: when the connection is not there. In Belcher, D. & Hirvela, A. (Eds.), The oral-literate connection: Perspectives on L2 speaking, writing and other media interaction (pp. 10-25). Ann Arbor, MI: The University of Michigan Press.

Cameron, J. (Producer & Director). (2010). Avatar [Motion picture]. USA: Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation.

Christenbury, L. & Kelly, P.P. (1983). Questioning: A path to critical thinking.Urbana, IL: ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communicative Skills and National Council of Teachers of English.

Evans, S. (2008). Reading reaction journals in EAP courses. ELT Journal, 62 (3), pp. 240-247.

Kreeft, J., Staton, J., Richardson, G. & Wolfram, W. (1993). InKreeft, J. & Staton, J. (Eds.), Dialogue journals in the multilingual classroom: Building language fluency writing skills through written interaction (pp. 196-221). Norwood, NJ: Ablex Publishing Corporation.

Mlynarczyk, R. W. (1998). Conversations of the mind: the uses of journal writing for second-language learners. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Publishers.

Salas, S. & Garson, K. (2007). Chifa: Freewriting within a required curriculum for adults. In Burns A. & De Silva J. (Eds.), Planning and teaching creatively within a required curriculum for adult learners (pp. 239-246). Alexandria, VA: TESOL.

Thesen, L. (1997). Voices, Discourse, and Transition: In Search of New Categories in EAP. TESOL Quarterly, 31 (3) pp. 487-51.

Williams, J. (2008). The speaking-writing connection in second language and academic literacy development. In Belcher, D. & Hirvela, A. (Eds.), The Oral-literate connection: Perspectives on L2 speaking, writing and other media interaction (pp. 10-25). Ann Arbor, MI: The University of Michigan Press.


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