Processes Methods of joining - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Slide1 l.jpg
Download
1 / 6

Higher Product Design Processes. Processes Methods of joining. Click on appropriate star. Processes. Wood processes Metal processes Plastic processes. Click on appropriate star. Wood processes. Laminating Routing Turning. Laminating.

I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.

Download Presentation

Processes Methods of joining

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Slide1 l.jpg

Higher Product DesignProcesses

Processes

Methods of joining

Click on appropriate star

© Learning and Teaching Scotland 2006


Processes l.jpg

Processes

Wood processes

Metal processes

Plastic processes

Click on appropriate star

© Learning and Teaching Scotland 2006


Wood processes l.jpg

Wood processes

Laminating

Routing

Turning

© Learning and Teaching Scotland 2006


Laminating l.jpg

Laminating

This is quite an accurate method of shaping wood. It involves building up a curved form with layers (‘lamina’). The layers may be thin veneers, thicker constructional veneers or saw-cut strips. They are assembled so that the grain of each layer is running in the same direction, following the curve (unlike plywood which has interlocking grain).

The layers are glued together with a strong adhesive and are sandwiched between the waxed faces of a former or a jig using cramp pressure. The layers bend to the shape of the jig and ‘set’ together.

Laminated salad servers

Another way of producing curved laminates is to use a ‘bagpress’. The process is similar to the one outlined above except that only one half of the mould is required. The thin layers are glued together and placed over the mould inside a bag from which all of the air is removed, causing the material to be pulled around the mould.

© Learning and Teaching Scotland 2006


Routing l.jpg

Routing

Routing is a very versatile process. It can be used to cut joints, produce a decorative edge on a piece of work (i.e. a table top or cupboard door) and even to produce turned products using a lathe attachment. Shown below is a hand-held power router. Routers are also available attached to a router table over which pieces of work can be run. Many different types of router ‘bit’ are available depending on the job to be done.

A hand-held power router

© Learning and Teaching Scotland 2006


Turning l.jpg

Wood lathe

Turning

The wood lathe can be used for turning in 2 ways – on the headstock or between centres. Either side of the headstock is suitable for turning, using a flat plate to produce such ‘flat’ products as bowls, dishes, formers and bases. To handle longer pieces of work, such as legs and spindles, you need to turn between centres. To do this, a drive centre is pushed into the spindle to turn the work which is supported at the other end by a ‘dead centre’ located in the tailstock.

Preparation for turning between centres

Preparation for turning on a face plate

© Learning and Teaching Scotland 2006


  • Login