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Oregon Tourism Commission Advertising Accountability Research. Final Report. 2002. Table of Contents. Page Background 4 The Research 6 Questionnaire 7 Definitions 9 Travel Motivators 10 Hot Buttons 14 Oregon’s Image 15 Image vs. Competitors 19

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Oregon tourism commission advertising accountability research l.jpg

Oregon Tourism CommissionAdvertising Accountability Research

Final Report

2002


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Table of Contents

Page

Background 4

The Research 6

Questionnaire 7

Definitions 9

Travel Motivators 10

Hot Buttons 14

Oregon’s Image 15

Image vs. Competitors 19

Image Strengths & Weaknesses vs. Competitors 44

Oregon’s Product Delivery 48

Advertising Awareness 51

Advertising Impacts on Image 54

Bottom Line Advertising Impacts 58


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Table of Contents (Cont’d)

Page

Appendices

Appendix A – Oregon’s Agricultural Image 65

Appendix B – Methodology 74


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Background

  • The Oregon Tourism Commission engaged Longwoods International to conduct a program of research that:

    • Provides an information base for strategic marketing

    • Measures the effectiveness of the OTC’s 2000 advertising campaign

    • Provides accountability in terms of the impact of the OTC’s marketing efforts on trips to Oregon.


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Background

  • The objectives of the program were to:

    • Determine the most important image factors in generating interest in a travel destination

    • Examine Oregon’s tourism image versus key competitors

    • Evaluate Oregon’s tourism product

    • Evaluate the OTC’s tourism advertising in terms of:

      • Advertising Impacts on Image:

        • Awareness

        • Impact on the State’s image as a travel destination

      • Bottom-line measures

        • Impact on trips to Oregon

        • Impact on travel and tourism spending in Oregon


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The Benchmark Research

  • An 8-page, 8½”x11” Benchmark survey was mailed in February, 2001 to residents of Oregon’s advertising markets:

    • 1700 to Oregon, Idaho, Washington and Northern California

    • 600 to the Southern California Region.

  • 1196 questionnaires were returned for a 52% response rate.

  • Respondents were members of a consumer mail panel balanced to be representative of the U.S. population.

  • Data were weighted prior to analysis.


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Benchmark Questionnaire

  • Questionnaire content included:

    • Top of mind awareness of Oregon as a vacation destination

    • Image of Oregon and key competitors (Washington, Montana, Idaho and British Columbia)

    • Past visitation to Oregon

    • Intentions to visit Oregon during various periods in 2000 and 2001

    • Awareness of Oregon’s tourism advertising.

  • A copy of the survey is appended to this report.


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The Conversion Research

  • A one page conversion survey was mailed in January of 2002 to respondents to the benchmark research who indicated that they were planning a trip to Oregon in the year following the conclusion of the tourism advertising campaign.

  • 400 surveys were mailed and 285 were returned for a return rate of 71%.

  • Data were weighted prior to analysis.

  • The conversion questionnaire asked respondents if they had visited Oregon in the period since responding to the benchmark survey.


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Definitions

  • Oregon’s RegionalAdvertising Markets include:

    • Primary Advertising Markets: Washington State, Oregon, Idaho, and Northern California

    • Secondary Advertising Markets: Southern California.



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Travel Motivators

  • What are the key travel motivators for Oregon as a vacation destination?

  • To answer this, we measured the degree of association between Oregon as a place travelers “would really enjoy visiting” and their ratings of the state on over 70 different destination attributes.

  • In order to better communicate the results, the attributes were then grouped into 11 categories or factors.


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Travel Motivators

  • For Oregon to be considered as a destination that travelers “would really enjoy visiting,” the state needs to be seen as:

    • An exciting, must-see destination

    • Having a great family atmosphere as well as being good for couples and adults.

  • Also important is that the destination be perceived to be:

    • A place with excellent sightseeing opportunities

    • A place offering a unique vacation experience

    • A popular, well-known place for a vacation

    • A place offering luxurious hotels and restaurants

    • A worry free, safe place to travel

    • Good for entertainment – live music, theatre and arts.


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Importance

Travel Motivators

Base: Residents of Oregon’s Regional Advertising Markets


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Oregon’s Hot Buttons

  • Looking at the 75 individual destination attributes, the following are the 10 most important (hot buttons) in generating travel interest:

    • Must see destination

    • Fun place for a vacation

    • Good for couples

    • Good for family vacation

    • Good for adult vacation

    • An exciting place

    • Unique vacation experience

    • Lots to see and do

    • Children would enjoy

    • A real adventure



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Oregon’s Image

  • Oregon has a reasonably strong image among residents of its advertising markets.

  • Approximately one half of all respondents strongly agreed that Oregon, as a travel destination is:

    • an exciting place to visit

    • a great place for a family vacation

    • and offers great sightseeing opportunities.

  • The good news is that these are the three most important travel motivators in generating interest in visiting a destination.


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Oregon’s Image

  • Nearly 6 in 10 respondents perceive Oregon to be:

    • A worry free, safe destination

    • An affordable place to get to, that is not too far away

    • A destination offering excellent sports and recreation activities.

  • While Oregon has some image weakness with regard to entertainment and climate, these are not particularly important in terms of generating interest in visiting.


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Oregon’s Image vs. The Competition

  • The challenge that needs to be addressed in the OTC’s advertising programs is that even in its image strengths Oregon remains somewhat undistinguished from its key competitors:

    • Exciting - Oregon trails British Columbia and Montana, and is tied with Washington

    • Family atmosphere and Sightseeing- Oregon trails only British Columbia and is more or less tied with Montana and Washington

    • Worry free – trails Montana and tied with B.C. and Idaho

    • Affordable – Oregon leads the pack here

    • Sports and Recreation – trails Montana but a little ahead of the rest.


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Oregon’s Image vs. Competitors

Base: Residents of Oregon’s Regional Advertising Markets

* Competitors include Washington State, Montana, Idaho and British Columbia


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Exciting

Base: Residents of Oregon’s Regional Advertising Markets

* Competitors include Washington State, Montana, Idaho and British Columbia


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Exciting

Base: Residents of Oregon’s Regional Advertising Markets


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Family Atmosphere

Base: Residents of Oregon’s Regional Advertising Markets

* Competitors include Washington State, Montana, Idaho and British Columbia


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Family Atmosphere

Base: Residents of Oregon’s Regional Advertising Markets


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Sightseeing

Base: Residents of Oregon’s Regional Advertising Markets

* Competitors include Washington State, Montana, Idaho and British Columbia


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Sightseeing

Base: Residents of Oregon’s Regional Advertising Markets

* Competitors include Washington State, Montana, Idaho and British Columbia


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Sightseeing

Base: Residents of Oregon’s Regional Advertising Markets


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Unique

Base: Residents of Oregon’s Regional Advertising Markets

* Competitors include Washington State, Montana, Idaho and British Columbia


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Unique

Base: Residents of Oregon’s Regional Advertising Markets


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Popular

Base: Residents of Oregon’s Regional Advertising Markets

* Competitors include Washington State, Montana, Idaho and British Columbia


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Popular

Base: Residents of Oregon’s Regional Advertising Markets


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Luxurious

Base: Residents of Oregon’s Regional Advertising Markets

* Competitors include Washington State, Montana, Idaho and British Columbia


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Luxurious

Base: Residents of Oregon’s Regional Advertising Markets


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Worry Free

Base: Residents of Oregon’s Regional Advertising Markets

* Competitors include Washington State, Montana, Idaho and British Columbia


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Worry Free

Base: Residents of Oregon’s Regional Advertising Markets


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Entertainment

Base: Residents of Oregon’s Regional Advertising Markets

* Competitors include Washington State, Montana, Idaho and British Columbia


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Entertainment

Base: Residents of Oregon’s Regional Advertising Markets


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Sports & Recreation

Base: Residents of Oregon’s Regional Advertising Markets

* Competitors include Washington State, Montana, Idaho and British Columbia


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Sports & Recreation

Base: Residents of Oregon’s Regional Advertising Markets

* Competitors include Washington State, Montana, Idaho and British Columbia


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Sports & Recreation

Base: Residents of Oregon’s Regional Advertising Markets


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Climate

Base: Residents of Oregon’s Regional Advertising Markets

* Competitors include Washington State, Montana, Idaho and British Columbia


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Climate

Base: Residents of Oregon’s Regional Advertising Markets


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Affordable

Base: Residents of Oregon’s Regional Advertising Markets

* Competitors include Washington State, Montana, Idaho and British Columbia


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Affordable

Base: Residents of Oregon’s Regional Advertising Markets



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Image Vs. The Competition

  • Versus the competitive set (Washington, Montana, British Columbia and Idaho):

    • Oregon’s image strengths are generally related either to outdoor activities or convenience of access and affordability

      • Notably, there is also a strength in festivals and events – an important and growing travel segment

    • Image weaknesses are in the areas of perceived excitement, adventure, uniqueness and interesting culture and custom – some of the most important image attributes when it comes to generating traveler interest.


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Oregon’s Strengths vs. The Competitors

Base: Residents of Oregon’s Regional Advertising Markets


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Oregon’s Weaknesses vs. The Competitors

Base: Residents of Oregon’s Regional Advertising Markets

* Attributes in bold type represent those which are most important



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Oregon’s Tourism Product

  • In evaluating Oregon’s tourism product, we compared the state’s image among those who have never visited (expectations) versus those who have visited in the last two years (recent experience or product).

  • Oregon’s tourism product clearly surpasses expectations in every category, including the most important travel motivators.

  • Recent visitors to Oregon have a stronger image of the state as:

    • An exciting, must see destination

    • An excellent vacation destination for both family and couples

    • Having great sightseeing and truly beautiful scenery.


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Oregon’s Product vs. Image

Base: Residents of Oregon’s Regional Advertising Markets

* Visited in past two years



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Advertising Awareness

  • We estimate that 3.8 million travelers in Oregon’s regional advertising markets were aware of the campaign:

    • This represents 14% of the residents (travelers) of the state’s regional advertising markets.


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Travelers Aware of Advertising

Total Aware of Advertising = 3.8 Million

Aware of Advertising

14%

Unaware of Advertising

86%



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Impact of Advertising on Image

  • The advertising had a significant impact on Oregon’s image as a travel destination.

  • Those who had seen the advertising were far more likely to consider the State an exciting and popular destination with great entertainment.

  • Moreover, travelers aware of the campaign scored Oregon more highly on every image factor and on the vast majority of individual image attributes.

  • More to the point, among the ten image attributes most positively impacted by the advertising are four of the “Hot buttons” discussed earlier. Clearly, the advertising is delivering many of the important messages that it needs to in order to influence travelers to consider Oregon as a travel destination.


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Impact of Advertising on Oregon’s Image

Base: Residents of Oregon’s Regional Advertising Markets


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Attributes Most Impacted by Advertising

Base: Residents of Oregon’s Regional Advertising Markets

* Attributes in bold type represent those which are most important



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Impact on Trips and Spending for Oregon

  • We estimate that a total of 220,000 trips from Oregon’s advertising markets were generated by the campaign between March 2000 to February 2002:

    • 185,000 overnight trips

    • 35,000 day trips.

  • We estimate that these visitors spent more than $40 million dollars in Oregon as a direct result of the advertising.*

  • The cost of generating one trip to Oregon was $1.69 and every marketing dollar spent resulted in $114.00 in visitor spending in Oregon.

*Source: Longwoods International 1997 visitor spending data/CPI index


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The Bottom Line

  • Based on data from Dean Runyan and Associates, we estimate that the incremental $40,000,000 in visitor spending generated more than $1.7 million in state and local taxes.*

  • Every dollar invested in this tourism marketing campaign generated:

    • $3.40 in state taxes

    • $1.60 in local taxes

    • A total return of5:1

*Source: Based on the relationship between visitor spending in Oregon and state taxes generated as established

in the Dean Runyan and Associates


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Trips Taken Due to 2000 Advertising Campaign

Base: Oregon’s regional advertising market

Trips Taken Due To Advertising – 220,300

Overnight Trips

185,300

84%

Day Trips

35,000

16%


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Visitor Expenditures Due To Advertising

Day Overnight Total

Total Visits Due to Advertising 35,000 185,300 220,300

Average Per Trip Spending $71.34 $202.77

Total Spending $2,500,000 $37,650,000 $40,150,000


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The Bottom Line

Total Visits Due to Advertising 220,300

Spending Due to Advertising $40,150,000

Total Marketing Cost $350,000

Marketing Cost per Trip $1.60

Visitor Spending per Marketing Dollar $114


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The Bottom Line

Spending Due To Advertising $40,150,000

Taxes*:

State $1,199,000

Local $547,000

Total $1,746,000

Marketing Cost $350,000

Return on Advertising Investment:

State $3.4

Local $1.6

Total $5.0

*Based on the relationship between visitor spending and state and local taxes

as established by Dean Runyan Associates.


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Appendix A: Oregon’s Agricultural Image


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Oregon’s Agricultural Image

  • As an adjunct to the tourism image aspect of this study we also asked respondents what their perceptions of Oregon (and its tourism competitors) were as a source of a number of agricultural products.

  • Clearly Oregon has a strong image with regard to Christmas trees, seafood, organically grown food, locally grown specialty food and for raspberries and blackberries.

  • As importantly, the State’s image on these items is significantly stronger than the competitive set (with the exception of locally grown specialty food where the image rating is similar to that of the competitors).


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Agricultural Image - continued

  • As a normal aspect of our analytic approach to the image data we collect, we compared the agricultural image ratings of respondents who had seen Oregon’s tourism advertising, to those who had not seen it.

  • An unexpected impact of the tourism advertising is that it clearly has a positive impact on the state’s image in other areas – in this case agricultural product.

  • Also interesting although somewhat more intuitive is that recent visitors to Oregon also have a more positive image of Oregon’s agricultural products.


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Oregon’s Image vs. Competitors*

Base: Residents of Oregon’s Regional Advertising Markets

* Competitors include Washington State, Montana, Idaho, British Columbia and California


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Oregon’s Image vs. Competitors*

Base: Residents of Oregon’s Regional Advertising Markets

* Competitors include Washington State, Montana, Idaho, British Columbia and California


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Impact of Advertising on Oregon’s Image

Base: Residents of Oregon’s Regional Advertising Markets


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Impact of Advertising on Oregon’s Image

Base: Residents of Oregon’s Regional Advertising Markets


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Oregon’s Product vs. Image

Base: Residents of Oregon’s Regional Advertising Markets

* Visited past two years


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Oregon’s Product vs. Image

Base: Residents of Oregon’s Regional Advertising Markets

* Visited past two years



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Research Approach

  • The image and accountability research was conducted among residents ofOregon’sadvertising marketsto:

    • Identify travel motivators for Oregon

    • Evaluate Oregon’s image

    • Measure awareness of the state’s tourism advertising.

    • Determine the impacts of the advertising on:

      • Oregon’s image

      • Plans to visit Oregon in the future

      • Trips to Oregon


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Research Approach

  • The advertising evaluation study was conducted using members of a major U.S. consumer mail panel that is balanced to be representative of U.S. households.

  • Within a household, survey data were obtained about a randomly selected adult household member.

  • To ensure that survey returns were representative, the data were weighted prior to analysis on key demographics.


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Research Approach

  • The use of representative, rather than convenience samples, allows us to project survey data to the populations of the region studied.

  • As a result, we are able to provide estimates of total travelers, expenditures, and advertising impacts based on the surveys.

  • In addition to the survey questions, complete demographic data on the respondents were available through the mail panel database.


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Conservative Approach

  • The approach taken by Longwoods to measure travel intent, trips taken, and the resulting tax revenues is highly conservative:

    • The methodology separates advertising impacts from impacts associated with the economy, weather, and other extraneous factors

    • Respondents who intended to travel regardless of advertising were backed out

    • Only one trip per respondent was attributed to advertising, even if more than one trip was taken.


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