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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Bureau of International Labor Affairs. International Child Labor Program FY 2006 Child Labor Education Initiative Bidders’ Meeting. April 21, 2006. International Child Labor Program Overview. ICLP combats the worst forms of child labor by:.

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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

Bureau of International Labor Affairs

International Child Labor Program

FY 2006 Child Labor Education Initiative

Bidders’ Meeting

April 21, 2006


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International Child Labor Program Overview

ICLP combats the worst forms of child labor by:

1. Researching and reporting information to inform U.S. foreign policy, trade policy, and development projects

2. Raising awareness among the U.S. public to increase their understanding of the issues related to child labor and efforts to combat the problem

3. Supporting technical assistance projects worldwide


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Technical Assistance

USDOL funded child labor technical cooperation projects (1995-2005)

MIDDLE EAST/

EUROPE/ EURASIA NORTH AFRICA

ASIA/PACIFIC

$118 million;

38 projects;

12 countries

$46.5 million;

15 projects;

13 countries

LATIN AMERICA/

CARIBBEAN

SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA

GLOBAL

$74 million;

36 projects

$109 million;

47 projects;

18 countries

$133 million;

43 projects;

32 countries


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Technical Assistance

Projects are funded through the:

IPEC $38 Million

INTERNATIONAL

PROGRAM

TO ELIMINATE

CHILD LABOR

(IPEC)

EDUCATION

INITIATIVE

(EI)


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Technical Assistance

International Program to Eliminate Child Labor (IPEC)

IPEC’s Mission:

To promote the political will and commitment of individual governments to eliminate child labor, in cooperation with employers, workers, NGO’s and others.

The United States is the leading donor to IPEC. Since FY 1995, USDOL has provided approximately $300 million to support over 125 IPEC projects in nearly 70 countries, as well as 31 global initiatives.


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Technical Assistance

International Program to Eliminate Child Labor (IPEC)

USDOL funded IPEC programs are characterized by their focus or structure. They include:

IPEC uses a multi-strategy approach to combat exploitive child labor, including:

Rehabilitative services and meaningful alternatives to child labor – including formal/non-formal education, vocational training, health care and nutritional services, counseling for children and income-generating/skills training activities for parents

Workplace and community based monitoring systems

Capacity building of national and local institutions and organizations

Awareness raising on the hazards of child labor and benefits of basic education

Timebound Programs

Country Programs

Sector Programs

Data collection and Research

International Awareness Raising


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Technical Assistance

Education Initiative (EI)

EI’s Mission:

EI seeks to improve access and quality of basic education for child laborers or children at risk of engaging in exploitive work.

Most EI projects are competitively bid. Since the EI began in 2001, USDOL has provided approximately $154 million to support 37 projects in 45 countries and one global project.


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Technical Assistance

Education Initiative (EI)

EI’s four objectives:

Awareness raising and mobilization

Stronger education systems

National policy development

Sustainability

Wherever possible, EI projects complement and support ongoing efforts funded by USDOL.


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Technical Assistance

Out of school

In school


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Technical Assistance

Children at the margins, are among the most difficult yet critical target groups to achieve Education for All goals.


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Critical Steps

Evaluation

Monitoring and

Strengthen capacity of children to succeed in educational settings (including through mainstreaming)

Withdraw children and place in educational settings

(transitional, formal, vocational)

Improve quality and relevance of education

Identify children, causes of child labor and barriers to education

Build capacity of education system to absorb and nurture children

Applications

Program and Policy


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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

Bureau of International Labor Affairs

International Child Labor Program

FY 2006 Child Labor Education Initiative

Bidders’ Meeting

April 21, 2006


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ICLP Performance Measures

USDOL’s Performance, Strategic, and Outcome Goals


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The President’s Management Agenda, 2002

  • Performance-based budgeting would mean that money would be allocated on the basis of what is actually being accomplished;

  • Identify mismanaged, wasteful or duplicative government programs with an eye to cutting their funding, redesigning them, or eliminating them;

  • Rigorous data or evaluations should be a prerequisite to continued funding


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What is GPRA and why is it important?

  • In 1993, United States Congress passed the Government Performance Results Act (GPRA) to establish strategic planning and performance measurement in the federal government to ensure that tax payers’ dollars were being used efficiently and effectively for the public good.

  • The act requires federal agencies to develop and submit strategic and annual performance plans that include performance goals and indicators.

  • Each year all federal government agencies receiving appropriated funds are required to submit to Congress a performance and accountability report.

  • Congress uses these reports to make informed assessments surrounding program effectiveness for future funding decisions.

  • For more information on GPRA, you may also visit: http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/mgmt-gpra/gplaw2m.html.


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USDOL’s Strategic & Performance Goals #3:Foster Quality Workplaces that are Safe, Healthy, and Fair

  • Strategic Goal #3

    • Foster Quality Workplaces that are Safe, Healthy, and Fair

      • Outcome Goal 3.3

        • Reduce the exploitation of child labor, protect the basic rights of workers, and strengthen labor markets internationally

  • Outcome Goal 3.3a

    • Contribute to the international elimination of child labor

  • USDOL-ICLP measures Outcome Goal 3.3a through selected indicators from data collected by its technical assistance projects that have direct action components.


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ILAB’s GPRA Indicators for Outcome Goal 3.3a

  • Number of children prevented or withdrawn from exploitive child labor provided education and/or training opportunities as a result of DOL-funded child labor elimination projects.

  • Number of countries with increased capacity to address child labor as a result of DOL-funded child labor elimination projects.


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What is ILAB’s Definition of “Withdrawn”?

Children withdrawn from exploitive work:

  • This refers to those children that were found to be working in exploitative child labor and no longer work under such conditions as a result of a project intervention. This category includes:

    • children that have been completely withdrawn from work, such as those involved in forms (a) – (c) of ILO Convention 182, and

    • children that were involved in hazardous work (part (d) of C.182) or work that impedes a child’s education (C. 138) but are no longer working under exploitative conditions because they are now working under improved working conditions (i.e. fewer hours or under safer conditions) or in other acceptable forms of work. Each child must also be benefiting or have benefited from direct educational or training opportunities/services, as defined below, provided by the project.


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What is ILAB’s Definition of “Prevented”?

Children prevented from exploitive work:

  • This refers to children that are either siblings of (ex-) working children or those children not yet working but considered to be at high-risk[1] of engaging in exploitive work (see definition 1.3 below). In order to be considered as “prevented” these children must benefit (or have benefited) from educational or training opportunities/services, as defined below (see Section 3.1), provided by the project.

  • [1] A “high risk” situation refers to a set of conditions or circumstances (family environment or situation, vicinity of economic activities prone to employ children, etc.) under which the child lives or to which it is exposed. Usually a clear definition of “high-risk” is provided in the project document or can be defined as part of baseline data collection.


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Conditional Worst Forms of Child Labor (5-14):

Children must be withdrawn or prevented depending on minimum age legislation and workplace hazards. In cases where children are permitted to work, tasks must be non-hazardous.

Unconditional Worst Forms of Child Labor (5-17):

Children must be completely withdrawn from work, with no exception.

Conditional Worst Forms of Child Labor (15-17):

Children must be prevented from working in hazardous conditions.

Non- hazardous work that may interfere with a child’s schooling (5-14):

Children must be prevented from workplace barrier that interfere with schooling.

Source: International Labour Office (2002). A Future Without Child Labour: Global Report under the Follow-up to the ILO Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work. Geneva, Switzerland

Defining “Exploitive” Child Labor


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How does ILAB define “increased capacity”?

Increased capacity in a country will be measured by one or more of the following:

  • The adaptation of the legal framework to the international standards

  • The formulation of specific policies and programs at the national, regional, or sectoral level within a country dealing with the worst forms of child labor (WFCL)

  • The inclusion of child labor concerns in relevant development, social and anti-poverty policies and programs

  • The establishment of a child labor monitoring mechanism



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