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Thevoicesofamerica org precinct organizing best practices

TheVoicesOfAmerica.orgPrecinct organizing Best Practices


Agenda

agenda


Thevoicesofamerica org precinct organizing best practices

  • All Content Available on Web Site

    • TheVoicesOfAmerica.org

  • Not an Organization

  • Precinct Organizing Best Practices Methodology


The road to serfdom

Dependency vs. Jobs

Spending & Debt

Tax & Redistribution

Equality / Social Justice & Rules / Regulations

Loss of Freedoms & Government/ Corporate Elite

The road to serfdom


George washington 0n parties

“However [political parties] may now and then answer popular ends, they are likely in the course of time and things, to become potent engines, by which cunning, ambitious, and unprincipled men will be enabled to subvert the power of the people and to usurp for themselves the reins of government, destroying afterwards the very engines which have lifted them to unjust dominion”.

GEORGE WASHINGTON, Farewell Address

September 17, 1796

George Washington 0n parties


Swot analyses

Strength – informed, passionate, volunteers

Weakness – grassroots, lack funding

Opportunity – elections won locally with votes

Threat – political parties dominate

SWOT Analyses


Messaging gotv win elections

  • 79% of voters think that it is possible the economy could collapse

    • Democrats -72%

    • Republicans – 84%

    • Independents - 80%

  • Those who think the government is too big

    • Democrats – 49%

    • Republicans - 84%

    • Independents - 74%

  • 56% of people say they think the federal government has become so large and powerful that it poses an immediate threat to the rights and freedoms of ordinary citizens.

    • Democrats - 37%

    • Republicans - 70%

    • Independents - 63%

Messaging & GOTV = Win Elections

Source: CNN – February 26, 2010 ---- Rasmussen – February 9, 2010 ---- Fox News – March 23, 2010;


Silent majority can win elections

  • 76% Of Electorate Are Like-Minded

    • 40% are Conservative

    • 36% are Moderate

    • 20% are Liberal

  • Conservatives Now Outnumber Liberals in All 50 States

“SILENT MAJORITY” can win elections

October 26, 2009 Gallup Poll


Build organization gotv

Leverages “Tea Party” Strength

Proven Method Already Exists

Civic Responsibility vs. Politics

Tax & Freedoms vs. Coupons

Build organization & GOTV

Grow

Patriot

Organization

Impact

Elections


Precinct organizing opportunities

Targeted - Door-to-Door Canvassing

Targeted - Volunteer Phone Banks

Targeted - Meetings / Socials

Targeted - Get-Out-The-Vote

Precinct organizing opportunities

VOTER

RECORDS


Winning elections at precinct level

  • Most effective methods based on statistical analysis

  • All the lobbying and candidate money can’t buy this capability!

  • Will have enduring effect - 33% will continue to vote in subsequent elections

Winning Elections at precinct level


Non partisan

Strength – broadest appeal & sustainable

Weakness – relies on voters to chose candidates

Opportunity – mobilize 70-80% voters w/o PAC

Threat – existing political parties dominate

Non-partisan


Thomas jefferson january 8 1789

'It is to me a new and consolatory proof that wherever the people are well-informed they can be trusted with their own government; that whenever things get so far wrong as to attract their notice, they may be relied on to set them to rights."

Thomas Jefferson - January 8, 1789


Voter education on candidates

voter education ON CANDIDATES

2010

Election

2012

Election

Patriot

Organization

Precinct

Organizing

CANDIDATE TOWNHALLS

VOTER GUIDES


Conservative candidates

  • “Tea Party” Republicans

    • Especially with “Precinct Executive” Strategy

  • Independents

    • Defecting Republicans

    • GOOOH

Conservative Candidates


Proven process used by political parties

Proven Process used by Political Parties


Thevoicesofamerica org precinct organizing best practices

Source: Williamson County, TX - Grassroots Action Democrats (GRAD) School Training


Voter contacts per vote ratio

Voter “contacts per vote” ratio

Source: Composite values across multiple randomized control studies including Gerber & Green & Yale University.

www.democracyforamerica.com


Why moved away from blockwalking

Why moved away from Blockwalking?

  • Money & Volunteer Access

    • Campaign consultants can’t make as much money

    • Nor do they have ready access to trustworthy volunteers

  • Campaign Consultants are Intermediaries for:

    • Mass Advertising

    • Centralized Phone Banks

    • Centralized Mail Campaigns

  • Prefer Centralized Message

  • Net, ADVANTAGE FOR US!


Faithful action

Strength – large, established communities

Weakness – not engaged in “public square”

Opportunity – join patriots to defend freedoms

Threat – omnipotent government replaces church

Faithful action


Door to door convassing

Door to door convassing


Precinct organizing

Precinct Organizing

Grow

Patriot

Organization

VOTER

RECORDS

One-On-One

Voter Engagement

Impact

Elections


Voter record

Voter Record

Note: Data has been scrambled and altered to protect voter’s privacy.


Voter engagement

  • Engage

    • I am a concerned citizen

    • Are you concerned about career politicians bankrupting our country & indebting our children

  • Educate

    • Importance & relevance of Constitutional principles

      • Limited government, free markets, individual freedoms

  • Request

    • Contact information – e-mail, cell phone, etc.

    • Join patriot organization

    • Volunteer with patriot organization

voter engagement


Get out the vote engagement

  • Provide

    • Patriot Organization Flyer

    • Candidate Nights

    • Voter Guide

  • Assist

    • Voter Registration

    • Early Voting

    • Mail-in / Absentee voting

    • Transportation

  • Mobilize

Get-Out-The-Vote Engagement


Precinct organizing1

Precinct Organizing

Grow

Patriot

Organization

VOTER

RECORDS

One-On-One

Voter Engagement

Impact

Elections


Precinct action timeline

Precinct Action timeline


Election leverage

Election leverage


Precinct voting perspective

1000 Eligible Voters

80% Register

60% Vote in Mid-Term & General Elections

30% Vote in Primaries & Off-Year Elections

Need Majority to Win

Precinct Voting Perspective


Focused voter engagement

Party Affiliation

Focused voter engagement

Always Vote Democratic

Always Vote Republican

Swing Voters

Always Vote

Sometimes Vote

Voter Turnout

Never Vote


Focused voter engagement1

Focused voter engagement

Don’t waste time with Democratic voters who always vote Party Line.

Party Affiliation

Always Vote Democratic

Always Vote Republican

Swing Voters

Always Vote

Sometimes Vote

Voter Turnout

Never Vote


Focused voter engagement2

Focused voter engagement

Don’t waste resources on people who always vote Republican

Party Affiliation

Always Vote Democratic

Always Vote Republican

Swing Voters

Always Vote

Sometimes Vote

Voter Turnout

Never Vote


Focused voter engagement3

Focused voter engagement

Don’t waste your resources on people who never vote.

Party Affiliation

Always Vote Democratic

Always Vote Republican

Swing Voters

Always Vote

Sometimes Vote

Voter Turnout

Never Vote


Focused voter engagement4

Focused voter engagement

Do engage Swing voters who always vote - Persuasion

Party Affiliation

Always Vote Democratic

Always Vote Republican

Swing Voters

Always Vote

Sometimes Vote

Voter Turnout

Never Vote


Focused voter engagement5

Focused voter engagement

Do engage Republicans who only sometimes vote - for GOTV

Party Affiliation

Always Vote Democratic

Always Vote Republican

Swing Voters

Always Vote

Sometimes Vote

Voter Turnout

Never Vote


Focused voter engagement6

Focused voter engagement

Do engage Swing voters who only sometimes vote – Persuasion & GOTV

Party Affiliation

Always Vote Democratic

Always Vote Republican

Swing Voters

Always Vote

Sometimes Vote

Voter Turnout

Never Vote


Voter election strategy

Need 324 votes to win

Assume 226 Republicans & Need 98/287 Independents

Focus on convincing 98 Independents

Can also focus on some of the 137 unregistered voters

Voter election strategy


Voter primary strategy

Need 57 votes to win Republican Primary

Need 35 votes to win Democratic Primary

voter primary strategy


Precinct strategic focus

Precinct strategic focus

  • ~650 Precincts per Congressional District

  • Focus greatest effort on precincts with greatest concentration of likely voters

  • Especially true during Get-Out-The-Vote (GOTV) phase leading up to the election


Precinct conservative liberal ratio

Precinct conservative / liberal ratio

Use Election Results, available from Secretary of State web site, to determine precinct voting patterns.


Summary prioritized voter engagement

Summary- Prioritized Voter engagement

Precinct

Priority Order

~650 Precincts per Congressional District

Registered Voter

Priority Order

~800 - 1000 Registered Voters per Precincts

Independent Voters & Always Vote

Republican Voters & Sometimes Vote

Independent Voters & Sometimes Vote

Most Conservative 30%

Split Mid 30%

Most Liberal 30%


Organizing for america

Organizing for america

Source: Building the National Democratic Party: the State Partnership Project


Organizing for america1

Organizing for america

Source: Building the National Democratic Party: the State Partnership Project


Organizing for america2

Organizing for america

Source: Building the National Democratic Party: the State Partnership Project


Get started

Get started


Plan of action

  • Regional Organizations Must Collaborate

    • District Strategy ( Federal & State )

    • Precinct Voter Strategy ( Federal & State )

  • Identify Precinct Coordinators

    • Recruit others to help

    • Aim for 10-20 volunteers/ precinct

  • Use TheVoicesOfAmerica.org website as best practices resource

Plan of action


Start with regional meeting of like minded organizations

  • Announce via each organization’s newsletters

  • Meet at: schools, churches, fire houses, libraries, municipal buildings

  • Identify Precinct Coordinators & Volunteers

    • Beforehand on web, when sign up

    • During meeting by looking at county precinct map and using stickies

  • Request attendees bring others to next meeting

    • +20% weekly in Knox County, Ohio

Start with regional meetingof like-minded organizations


Precinct organizing roadmap

Precinct organizing roadmap

Political

Impact

& GOTV

Precinct

Core

Team

Grow Volunteer Base

Identify Family

& Friends

Precinct

Meeting

Or Social


Volunteer phone bank

  • Second most effective “Precinct Organizing” methodology

  • Convey an authentic sense of enthusiasm and commitment.

  • Use a brief opening script and then evolve into a relaxed conversation

    • Pause for questions

    • Invite respondents to obtain more information by visiting the organization’s website.

Volunteer Phone Bank


Phone bank script

Hello, is this _______________?

My name is _____________.

I am a neighbor of yours on ____________ street and I am a leader / member of the Tea Party / Patriot group called __________. Have you hear of Tea Parties / Our Group?

I am a conservative concerned for our country and I got involved because I had to do something to try and stop the destruction of our way of life by career politicians. They are bankrupting our country, taking over private sector businesses, and increasing the government’s control over every aspect of our lives! Like many of us, I am worried for my children and grandchildren.

We meet every other __(Day of week)____ at _____(Location)____ starting at _____(Time)___ p.m. Our objective is to get citizens, like you, to join us and educate them on what they can do.

I want to invite you, your spouse, neighbors, relatives, and friends to come and hear what we are doing locally next  __(Day and Date)___ . It is very satisfying to be united with other patriots and share in this movement to take back our country. Can I count on you to come to this meeting?

If you would be so kind to give me your e-mail address, I’ll put you on our list to keep you informed.

Thank you and have a good day/ evening / weekend.

Phone bank script


Phone bank success example

  • On a Sunday afternoon called registered Republicans within his precinct.

    • Used Voter Records to focus calls to assure they would be most productive.

  • Made thirty-six calls (4.4 minutes average per call),

    • Was able to connect with fifteen voters (42% completion rate),

    • Of these fifteen, eleven (73% success rate) were interested in joining his organization.

    • Many indicated that they would bring others to the meeting.

  • Once through script, ended up in a productive conversation.

  • Most were aware of the Tea Party movement, but had not taken the initiative to get involved.

Phone bank – success example

Ralph Kraus, leader of the Patriot Unite organization in northwest Ohio


Start with robo call recruitment

  • Call all targeted voters in precinct

    • Easy and fast method to reach many voters

    • Able to update voter records by finding numbers that are no longer in service

    • Leave call back messages

  • Messages can be used for:

    • Assuring people "they are not alone“

    • Invite them to join your organization

    • Alerting people of important meetings

    • Get-Out-The-Vote on election day

  • Preferred supplier provides capability to us at 4 cents per 60 second call.

    • Calling 1,100 people in a precinct  costs only $44.

    • Tom Zawistowski at 1-800-846-4630 Ext 104 or e-mail him at [email protected]

Start with robo-call recruitment


Thevoicesofamerica org precinct organizing best practices

Website:

TheVoicesOfAmerica.org


Thevoicesofamerica org precinct organizing best practices

  • Download or Print Presentation from Website

  • NEW – Join the Discussion


Testimonials

“Thanks you so much for sending along your PowerPoint of your Precinct Organizing Best Practices slide show. It was fantastic! Our event was very successful. We had about 150 people who attended. Everyone loved the PowerPoint.” – Jonathan, California

“First let me thank you for your tireless efforts in gathering this information, your power point, and the website.  I listened on CSPAN to your presentation given at the Nat'l Tea Party Convention and have replayed the archived video at CSPAN a couple of times.  I was most impressed.  I have also been researching this precinct strategy since last May (2009).  I now see, with your help, that I can actually take this to our various groups in Iowaand set the plan in motion.  Thank you, thank you, thank you.”– Marcia, Iowa

“I am a program manager for a voter registration program for the … County Republican Party. I enjoy the site a lot and wanted to know if it would be okay to print out your The Voices of America.org logo on some signs to be used at our headquarters in training staff?”– Steve, California

 “I heard about your site from my sister-in-law … in Utah.  She said that they have gained many members from the robo-calling. … I have read through your site and want to thank you for sharing your information and experience freely given online.  There are many of us that are so new to political activity and appreciate such guidance. … I like that it is nonpartisan because many people who love our country do not like like party politics, but still want to help change the direction that our country is heading. “ – Heather, Oregon

testimonials


Candidate nights

Candidate nights


Voter education on candidates1

voter education ON CANDIDATES

2010

Election

2012

Election

Patriot

Organization

Precinct

Organizing

CANDIDATE TOWNHALLS

VOTER GUIDES


Candidate townhalls

  • Candidate Townhalls should occur before voters receive their mail-in / absentee ballots

  • Ideally, they occur sufficiently prior to elections

    • To allow Voter Guides to be created and disseminated to voters,

    • Based on candidate statements made during these townhalls.

  • In Ohio, May 4th Primary mail-in / absentee ballots are sent out as early as March 30, 2010.

Candidate townhalls


Candidate townhalls1

  • Audience members ask questions of the candidate in a real time fashion.

    • When audience members enter the townhall event, ask if would like to ask a question.

    • Give them a card to fill out with their name.

  • In order to maintain objectivity ask a member of the audience to select cards at random

    • The person selected from the card will be allowed to direct questions to the participants.

    • Each candidate will then have 3 minutes to answer the question.

    • The person asking the question will have an opportunity to ask one follow up question, if desired.

    • That person may ask a different candidate the same question or a follow up with the original candidate

Candidate townhalls


Candidate townhalls2

  • Before getting started each candidate will have 5 minutes to voice his/her reasons for running   

  • Any question directed to the candidate with a yes or no requested answer will be required to answer with a yes or no.

    • The candidate will then be given the allotted 3 minutes to explain his/her position.

  • At the end of the question and answer period each candidate will have 3 minutes for a closing statement. 

  • After the event compile a voter guide from all questions and answers to distribute throughout the precinct.

Candidate townhalls


Thevoicesofamerica org precinct organizing best practices

Questions?


Precinct team

Precinct team


How to create a precinct organization

The best time to start is NOW

Create a knowledgeable, cohesive team that is already engaged in the political process by the next election

You’ll have established leaders who are prepared to incorporate late-arriving volunteers and put them immediately to work doing meaningful and productive tasks

How to Create a precinct organization


How to create a precinct organization1

  • Host an introductory event

    • Entertaining and interesting events to discuss relevant Constitutional principles

    • Potluck dinner

    • Coffees, BBQ’s, Chili Suppers

    • House Party affiliated with a like-minded community organization

    • DVD Night

    • Political Statement Costume Party

  • Reach out to personal social networks

    • Invite people you know who share your political and social values

    • Ask them to invite their friends and acquaintances who also share these principles and values

    • Network with acquaintances from: Church, work, children’s school and sports

How to Create a precinct organization


How to create a precinct organization2

  • Gather contact information as people arrive via a sign-in sheet

  • Get to know each other

  • Go around and have people introduce themselves

  • Talk about direction of country and if they have ever volunteered for anything

  • You may want to take notes about personal details like the issues that concern them as well as the likelihood your guest might be interested in volunteering.

  • If you have a large amount of people, you may want to designate several facilitators and break your party into manageable groups of 10 to 15.

How to Create a precinct organization


How to create a precinct organization3

  • Follow-up

    • Within a few days after the event, call or email everyone who attended and thank them.

    • Ask if they would like to participate in similar regularly-scheduled events.

    • At this phase, target prospects — not recruit volunteers.

    • Just ask them to commit to attending interesting events where they can participate in lively conversations.

    • Ask what their preferences are from the list in Step #6.

    • Target for 10 - 20 participants. With absenteeism and attrition you will still have a lively group.

  • Build an Excel database of prospects

How to Create a precinct organization


How to create a precinct organization4

  • Schedule monthly or bi-weekly events

    • The events should be slightly structured.

    • Announce the subject before the get-together and encourage attendees to become knowledgeable in order to participate in the discussion.

    • This will create community involvement, personal connections and help people become better informed.

    • Event ideas: A Constitutional based Book Club, Issue Forums, Movie Nights, Study Groups, Coffee House Gatherings, Meet at bars (“Drinking Conservatively” or “Drink ‘til You’re Red”), Wine or Beer Tastings, Constitutional Play Dates, Afternoon Teas, Regular Potlucks, Constitutional Trivia Competitions

How to Create a precinct organization


How to create a precinct organization5

  • Identify Precinct Leadership Volunteers

    • The best candidates for precinct leadership positions will become apparent.

    • Approach them and ask them to be part of your precinct organization leadership.

    • Assign volunteers to precinct leadership positions based on their location in the precinct or based on skills and/or availability.

  • Keep the momentum growing

    • Many of your friends and neighbors may feel equally upset about the direction of our country, but because of family, job, and other obligations may not know about your organization or of other like-minded neighbors.

    • They would be eager to connect with like-minded organizations such as yours. They’re just waiting for someone to ask.

    • With a targeted “friend-to-friend” approach, a few volunteers can reach a vast number of like-minded individuals who are interested in working together in taking back our country from out-of-touch, corrupt politicians.

How to Create a precinct organization


How to create a precinct organization6

  • Start a friend-to-friend campaign

    • Ask new participants to reach out to their social networks

    • Have volunteers select 15 to 20 people they might know (even slightly) from the County’s Voter Record list, who might be interested in connecting with a Constitutional principle based community.

    • Have these volunteers use the Blockwalking or Robo-call script as a guide to engage and invite their selected acquaintances to participate in regularly scheduled events.

    • Because the volunteers already know the person, they don’t have to make the much feared cold calls

    • Maintain a database of who was called and the results of the call

  • Keep all prospective volunteers informed

    • Through a Yahoo or Google email Group

    • Via a phone network/tree for people without email access

    • Distributing a Newsletter

    • Newspaper announcements

    • Bulletin board notices

How to Create a precinct organization


Precinct team1

Precinct Team


Precinct coordinator role

Recruit and train volunteers

Organize precinct by blocks or zones

Identify targeted voters within precinct

Set attainable goals, plan, assure “movement”with metrics, and motivate volunteers.

Inform, educate, register, and recruit targeted voters

Assure targeted voters know how to get absentee ballots and that they submit them.

Distribute flyers, voter guides, etc.

Get voters to polls

Conduct meetings /socials

Be year-round liaison

Precinct Coordinator Role


Partition your precinct

Partition Your Precinct


Precinct team support roles

Precinct Team – support roles


Precinct team support roles1

  • Excel Database Manager

    • Assure Voter Records are up to date and all new contact information is captured

    • Provide volunteers with blockwalk list of targeted voters and collect new information

    • Assure backups exist and only leaders have access to the database

  • Resource Coordinator

    • Make sure voter registration forms are available.

    • Assures food, water, etc. are available for events.

  • Voter Registration / Compliance Expert

    • Responsible for knowing State’s voter registration laws

    • Assures that volunteer canvassers comply with laws

  • Training Coordinator

    • Coordinates the program and training portion of events.

    • Works with surrogate speakers and finds voter registration trainer.

  • Volunteer Recruiter

    • Assures overall precinct volunteer needs are met.

    • Helps coordinate volunteers in support of precinct tasks and events.

Precinct Team – support roles


Precinct core team meeting

  • Identify who will lead each of the Precinct Team areas of responsibilities

    • Agree on what tasks each area entails

    • Identify volunteer support needs for each area

  • Identify targeted voters for canvassing in precinct using Voter Records and Precinct Map

    • Break precinct into sections for Blockwalking

  • Develop Precinct Action Plan

    • Voter canvassing dates & training - 1st and 2rd round timing

    • Data Entry Team meeting, schedule, strategy

    • Voter persuasion, registration, and Mail-in-voter plans with flyers - 1st and 2rd round timing

    • Get-Out-The-Vote (GOTV) Plan with Voter Guides – early voting, Mail-in voting, and election day 72 hour plan

    • Supportive actions such as socials, precinct wide meetings, etc.

  • Plan Precinct “Social” Meetings to inform, educate, and recruit

Precinct core team meeting


Precinct volunteer recruitment

Easier to recruit and excite with non-partisan message and specific tasks

From like-minded organizations

Call/ e-mail personal contacts

Existing, like-minded community leaders

Robo-call likely voters from Voter Records

Post a flyer at your church, community center, library, school, meetings of other organizations.

From block walk of precinct

Reach out to local schools

Precinct volunteer recruitment


Volunteer logistic considerations

  • Need 10-20 volunteers per precinct

  • Volunteers can accomplish

    • 20 door knocks per hour in 2-3 hour shifts

    • 35 - 50 calls per hour in 2-3 hour shifts depending on script length

  • Aim for 3-4 contacts of targeted voters prior to election day

    • Minimum 1-2 door-to-door contacts with door hangers & flyers

    • In “opposition” territory rely more on “stealth” campaign with more dependence on phone, e-mail, and meeting communications.

volunteer logistic considerations


Voter record1

Voter Record

Note: Data has been scrambled and altered to protect voter’s privacy.


Basic voter file data

Name

Voting Address

Mailing Address

Phone Number

Date of Birth

Gender

Date of Registration

Party Affiliation (varies by state)

Race / Ethnicity (varies by state)

Political Geography

Vote History

Basic Voter File Data


Training agenda

  • Goal

    • Grow organization and political impact

    • Impact 2010 Elections

  • Voter Contact

    • Importance of non-partisan engagement

    • Setting vote goals, strategy, and targeting

    • Voter contact tactics and timelines

    • Using Voter Records

    • Blockwalking, Phone banking, and Robo-calls

    • Voter registration

    • Absentee & vote by mail

    • Early voting

    • GOTV ( Get Out The Vote )

  • Candidate Engagement

    • Townhalls

    • Voter Guides

  • Precinct Organizing

    • How to get started

    • Team roles and responsibilities

    • Recruiting volunteers and identifying leaders

    • How to conduct effective precinct meetings and “socials”

    • Fundraising

    • Training

  • New Media Leverage

    • Overall strategy

    • Utilizing e-mail and websites to keep precincts informed and to recruit volunteers

    • Blog & Twitter outreach

    • Using Facebook, Myspace, and other social networks

Training agenda


Precinct fundraising

  • Ideas

    • Garage sale, bake sale, ice cream social, car wash, dog wash, silent auction, pot luck,

    • Ask for contributions at meetings and social events

    • Require modest membership dues for precinct “club”

    • Sell T-shirts and buttons at a small profit

    • An annual event that could become a precinct tradition

    • Brainstorm for ideas at precinct meetings

  • Avoid Party affiliations, since will be subject to state fundraising and ethics laws pertaining to Parties. For example, in Texas:

    • Any club or organization associated with a Party can raise or spend $500 before it has to appoint a campaign treasurer and start filing reports.

    • If a club exceeds this $500 threshold in the middle of a campaign, it will be “frozen” from doing any further activity for a 60 day period.

    • If you exceed the $500, the club or organization has to register as a General Purpose Committee with the Texas Ethics Commission.

    • If you plan to do any activity to support or oppose a candidate for statewide office, state legislator, state Board of Education, or any multi-county district office, the club or organization has to register 30 days before the election.

    • This $500 threshold is a one-time, cumulative threshold on a per election, per candidate, or per year basis.

Precinct Fundraising


Precinct meeting

Precinct meeting


Logistics precinct social gathering

Location - church, schools, fire houses, libraries, municipal buildings, apartment or condo club house

Have people bring a snack or dessert to share. Food is always a good ice breaker.

Use name tags with addresses and have people sign in

Provide handouts

Allow time for socializing.

Logistics - Precinct “Social” Gathering


Agenda precinct social gathering

  • Facilitate a sense of common goals /community and motivate.

  • Provide an overview

    • Precinct organizing process

    • Precinct organizing action timeline and key election related dates

    • Explain where people fit into the process

    • How training and materials will be provided

  • Describe each precinct team task & ask for volunteers

    • Voter canvassing to identify likely voters and gather contact information

    • Door-to-door persuasion to inform, educate, and recruit voters using flyers

    • Get-Out-The-Vote (GOTV) Team – importance of last 72 hours prior to the election

      • Early Voting and Mail-In-Ballots

      • Election Day callers, drivers, poll checkers, and baby sitters

      • Blockwalkers with Voter Guides

    • “Social” event and fundraising ideas

    • Data entry to keep the Voter Records updated

  • Ask people for contributions to help defray precinct organizing expenses.

    • Pass a basket or have one at the door with a sign.

Agenda - Precinct “Social” Gathering


Tips precinct social gathering

  • Stay on agenda

    • Designate a time keeper

    • If an unexpected popular issue is raised, take a vote to determine if want to take 5-10 minutes to discuss issue immediately or later. Could also opt to assign volunteers or a committee.

  • Overcome anxiety and/or burnout

    • Indicate that taking action with like-minded neighbors is an antidote

    • Share local, state-wide, or national successes

    • Elections are often won or lost by small margins, each vote is important

    • Provide periodic precinct updates.

      • May even start a precinct web site.

      • Assure that on follow-up e-mails will use blind-copy (bcc) feature to hide e-mail addresses

    • Assure that obtain suggestions, feedback, and critiques from volunteers

      • What was done well

      • What could be improved

Tips - Precinct “Social” Gathering


Prime the pump

  • Organization Leaders

    • Go door-to-door

    • Train others

    • Etc.

  • Recruit Few Volunteers before Meeting

    • Old sales approach

    • Recruited volunteers will cause others to step-up

“prime the pump”


Leverage all touchpoints

Call

Stop by house

Send a note

e-mail blasts

Create a web site for precinct

Create a Yahoo or Google discussion list or “blog” to move communications throughout your Precinct.

Candidate Forums

Neighborhood Association Meetings

Churches

Leverage all touchpoints


Door to door convassing1

Door to door convassing


Thevoicesofamerica org precinct organizing best practices

Source: Building the National Democratic Party: The State Partnership Project


Preparing for a blockwalk 1

  • Plan at least forty-five days ahead

  • Team up with ethnic or religious groups that maintain mailing lists of individuals who might serve as targets for campaign

  • Aim for about 3-4 contacts of targeted voters prior to Election Day. Of these, a minimum of 1-2 contacts should be door-to-door contacts with door hangers. Other contacts can be via phone.

  • Define expectations for the number of houses to visit and recruit volunteers, along with back up volunteers.

    • Volunteers can knock on 20 doors per hour.

    • With an expected 50% contact rate per pass, canvassers will end up talking with about 8-10 households per hour.

    • Older voters will be more likely to be home than young voters.

  • Provide a brief training session for volunteers.

    • Training does not need to be extensive – about half hour is sufficient.

    • Informal communication style works best.

    • Canvassers should use own speaking style

    • Experienced canvassers are only slightly more effective than newcomers.

  • Mobilize voters by making them feel wanted at the polls. Personal invitations convey the most warmth and work best. Phone calls in which the caller converses with the respondent is second best.

  • Building on voter’s preexisting level of motivation to vote is also important. Calling back a voter who indicated a previous interest to vote is a powerful mobilizing tactic.

  • Many nonvoters will vote if they think that others are watching. Remind that voting is a matter of public record, but do so carefully.

Preparing for a blockwalk - 1


Preparing for a blockwalk 2

  • Other face-to-face opportunities which may also generate votes are: retirement homes, shopping centers, night schools, house parties, and religious centers

  • In “opposition” territory rely more on “stealth” campaign with more dependence on phone, e-mail, and meeting communications.

  • Other than getting out votes, canvassing can provide other “benefits”, such as:

    • Persuading voters to vote in a certain way

    • Canvassers receive useful feedback which can be leveraged

    • Campaign material handed out will publicize the campaign and communicate its message

    • Clean up the out-dated voter lists

    • Register new voters

    • Create database and flag voters for GOTV special attention

  • Prepare maps and street walk sheets prior to blockwalking dates

  • Plan to have coffee, pastry, and bottled water for volunteers on day of blockwalk

  • Blockwalk in pairs – one speaker and one data taker/navigator or split up sides of street

  • May need residents to Blockwalk within gated communities and apartments

  • Plan a time and place to meet after the blockwalk to collect updated voter records and to debrief

  • Provide blockwalk volunteers with precinct core team cell phone numbers, so can call if have questions and /or issues

  • Prepare door hangers, flyers, or sticky notes one week in advance

  • Record updated Voter Contact information as soon as possible

  • Send a thank-you note to your blockwalk volunteers

Preparing for a blockwalk - 2


Blockwalk materials needed

  • Volunteer name badge

  • Street walking lists with identified, targeted voters from Voter Records (Update with voter contact information and involvement interest, i.e. volunteer, join, or just keep informed)

  • Precinct map

  • Clipboard, pen, and pencils

  • Voter feedback list to capture comments

  • Door hangers or flyers to inform/educate, provide your contact information, and inform of precinct meeting /“social” events

  • 2010 Election important dates & location of polling location

  • Voter Registration Forms

  • Mail-in/ Absentee Ballot Applications

  • Pre-addressed, stamped envelopes with County Clerk’s address

  • Voter Guides when closer to election

blockwalk - Materials needed


Optimium blockwalking times

Weekdays4 p.m. - 7 p.m.

Saturdays10 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Sundays1 p.m. - 7 p.m.

Optimiumblockwalking times


Non partisan focus

  • Need to grow “Tea party” movement

    • 24% of voters part-of “Tea Party” (Was 16% a month ago.)*

    • Build on existing political diversity – 28% I /13% D

  • Use message

    • Which unites, instead of divides

    • Taps into current strongly held beliefs by the majority of the population.

    • With sustainable relevance, vs. candidates & issues

  • Trust informed and engaged voters to decide on candidates

    • Use Candidate Nights and Voter Guides

  • Avoid need for Political Action Committee (PAC)

Non-Partisan Focus

* Rasmussen National Survey, April 13, 2010. USA Today/ Gallup Poll indicated 28% support in Mach 26-28 survey.


Blockwalking script

Hello: My name is _______. I am a concerned citizen from your neighborhood who is troubled by how politicians of both parties are bankrupting our country and are jeopardizing our children’s and grandchildren’s future.

Are you concerned about what is going on in Washington?

NO – What political party do you belong to?

Do you plan to vote in November’s election?

Thank you for your time. Good-bye.

Yes - Great! It’s nice to meet others who are concerned. We are trying to identify voters in the neighborhood so that we can work together to elect candidates who believe in Constitutional Principles of limited government, free markets, and individual freedoms.

Might you, or anyone living in this household, be interested in volunteering to help us with this initiative. --- YES --- Indicate on Voter Record list a 1-5 support score.

Is your phone number still __________________? --- Fix or get # and record.

Do you have a cell phone? E-mail? It would make it easier for us to communicate with you and send you information regarding educational events or information about the upcoming election. -- - Add cell phone and e-mail information to Voter Record.

Does anyone living here need to register to vote or need to vote by mail (absentee)? --- YES ---provide the forms and fill out VR.

Here is a flyer with information about our organization, how we can be contacted, and information about upcoming educational events.

Thank you for your time . I hope to see you soon.

Listed Voter No Longer Lives at Address

Add new resident to the Voter Record. Find out if the current resident is a Democrat, Independent or Republican and mark appropriate column. If either Independent or Republican have them fill out the voter registration form. Offer to mail the VR form for them. They will receive a new voter certificate in about 30 days.

Blockwalking script


Voter discussion tips

  • Make a personal connection

    • Look for common concerns

    • Use information from the Voter Record and observations as you approach the door ( political signs, children’s toys, etc.) as aids to focus your message

    • Use your own personal story of why you chose to get involved

  • Listen to voter’s concerns

    • Good communication requires being a good listener

  • Reassure them that you are a neighbor and a volunteer

    • Volunteers and neighbors are most effective in engaging likely voters

  • Validate their opinion

    • It’s a two-way communication at the door, not a “sell”

    • If you argue and indicate that they are wrong, you’ve lost

  • Explain how Constitutional principles are relevant and important in regard to today’s issues

    • Use simple language

    • Be sincere, truthful, and genuine

    • Draw favorable distinctions between your position and the opposition to Constitutional principles

  • End with a call to action, such as please volunteer, join, vote, or read the brochure

Voter discussion tips


Sample responses

  • “I am not aware of any issues and don’t really care much about the political process”

    • You may not be aware of the issues and their significance, because the mainstream media does not properly report the issues.

    • The politicians, in violation of Constitutional principles, are assuming full control of everything that affects you and are thus taking away your liberties and money (in higher taxes).

  • “I always vote the Party line”

    • I am sure they’ve appreciated your loyalty, but even within the existing Parties there is now dissention based on where the Parties have taken this country.

    • In fact, many Party loyalists are leaving the Parties. In recent polling “Tea Party” candidates are now preferred over either Party.

  • “They are all corrupt”

    • Certainly one may get that impression because the media focuses on corrupt politicians and of course power does tend to corrupt.

    • Because of this concern many good citizens are choosing to run for office for the first time ever in an effort to do something about this corrupting influence in current politics.

  • “My vote doesn’t matter anyway”

    • Democrats in 2008 won key states by gaining only 10 more Democratic votes in each precinct.

    • It is this realization, that a few votes can make an important difference, of why have gotten involved and volunteered to go door-to-door.

Sample Responses


Blockwalking no one home

  • Prepare post-its to leave behind with “Sorry I Missed You” message and your contact information.

  • Indicate that you are a concerned citizen from the neighborhood who is troubled by how politicians of both parties are bankrupting our country and are jeopardizing our children’s and grandchildren’s future.

  • Request that if they share your concern that they contact you by phone.

  • When they call back, use the original script over phone.

  • If they don’t call back, re-visit the home.

Blockwalking – No one home


Rural blockwalking

Blockwalk the high density areas

Robo-call the low density ranches and farms

Post flyers and information at feed stores, Co-ops, grocery stores, and restaurants.

Conduct meetings / “socials” with speakers

Offer free documentaries relating to Constitutional Principles at local theaters

Get permission to use silos or barn sides for Constitutional Principle based messages with contact information

Rural “blockwalking”


College blockwalking

  • Pursue “First Impression” opportunities

    • Move-in day

    • Student organization fairs

    • Classroom “storms”

  • Leverage campus organizations and leaders

    • Student clubs

    • Greek outreach

  • Utilize student’s internet based social networks

College “blockwalking”


Do s of a precinct blockwalk

Use identifying name tags, buttons, or t-shirts. Should be provided by organization. Bring umbrellas or plastic covers, in case needed due to rain.

Take off sunglasses before speaking to anyone.

 Step back from door after ringing bell so less threatening to apprehensive homeowner

 Work off script and listen. Informal communication style works best. Canvassers should use own speaking style

 Canvassers should only answer questions which focus on why canvasser personally supports the campaign, unless canvasser is quite knowledgeable. Otherwise have voter call “headquarters”.  Confine conversation to Constitutional Principles of limited government, free markets, and individual freedoms.

 Focus on the future. Discuss where we are versus where we would like to be.

 Be succinct and a good listener.

 Be pleasant and friendly

 Get the voter’s contact information – phone numbers & e-mail.

 Admit if you don’t have an answer to a question and promise to get the information and call again. Paves the way for a second call.

 Leave information flyer and contact information for precinct leaders

 Refer any media/ press inquiries to the Precinct Coordinator

 Give updated Voter Records back to the Precinct Database Manager

Do’s of a precinct blockwalk


Don ts of a precinct blockwalk

Blockwalk alone

Go into homes or apartments, even if invited

Go into fenced and gated yards

Walk across people’s yards

Wear offensive clothing

Hard sell or argue

Antagonize

Raise controversial issues

Make derogatory remarks about specific political organizations, candidates, or officeholders

Make statements about candidates which cannot be proven

Place anything in a mailbox – It is AGAINST the LAW

Don’ts of a precinct blockwalk


Registering new voters

  • Make sure all volunteers who register new voters become “Certified Deputy Registrars” – must be non-partisan!

    • Have the County Clerk’s office schedule a thirty minute training and certification session

    • The County Clerk’s office will provide voter registration forms and a “Deputy Voter Registrar” number.

  • Target like-minded, Constitutional principled citizens for registration

    • Determine disposition during Blockwalking

    • Identify candidates at events – PTO meetings, sports events, colleges, high schools, naturalization ceremonies, stores

    • Identify “New Movers” into your neighborhood

  • Voter registration applications must be received by the county voter registrar thirty days before an election in order to vote in that election

Registering new voters


Key voter data

  • Assure Voter Records Correct (From Board of Election)

    • Name and address

    • Party affiliation – Dem., Rep., or Independent

    • Voting intent – always, sometime, and never

  • Added Information from Blockwalking

    • Not home – left contact information & follow-up tracking

    • Phone numbers – home & cell

    • e-Mail

    • Support intensity on 5-1 scale, e.g. volunteer, join, or just interested

    • Voter Registration & tracking

      • Given application

      • Sent in application

      • Confirmed by Board of Election

    • Given flyer, door-hanger, etc.

    • Special needs situation – e.g. will need ride to polls on GOTV

  • GOTV Tracking Records, starting with Blockwalk contact

    • Mail-In Ballot contact & tracking

      • Given application

      • Sent in application

      • Received Ballot

      • Sent in ballot

    • Early Voting contacts

    • Election Day contacts

Key Voter data


Phone banks

PHONE BANKS


Volunteer phone bank1

Personal calls made by volunteers, who believe in the cause, are the second most effective “Precinct Organizing” methodology behind door-to-door canvassing.

Nothing beats face-to-face discussions and relationship building!

Volunteers are effective because they can convey an authentic sense of enthusiasm and commitment.

It’s best for these volunteers to use a brief opening script and then evolve into a relaxed conversation, pausing for questions and inviting respondents to obtain more information by visiting the organization’s website.

Volunteer Phone Bank


Volunteer phone bank key findings

  • Competent callers can complete 16 calls/ hour with an up-to-date call list and chatty script

  • Make calls on weekday evenings from 5-9 p.m. and on weekends from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

  • Hand-dialed phone banks have completion rates of 50%, in contrast to automated dialers with completion rates as low as 15% or less.

  • Anecdotal evidence suggests a very high success rate when using Voter Records to focus who is called and inviting voters to join your patriot organization. See success example on right. Statistical analyses show that 1 vote per 38 contacts is obtained when calling to Get-Out-The-Vote. Talented volunteers or calls within last week prior to elections can increase success rate to 1 vote per 20 completed calls.

  • When calling out of state, avoid calling charges by using cell phone minutes. MoveOn.org did this extensively in 2004 and 2006 campaigns. Sometimes a large supportive business will permit volunteers to make calls from its offices after hours. 

  • Provide printed instructions and a copy of the script (make conversational) for volunteers and alert them to how they should deal with contingencies.

    • Leave message on messaging machine?

    • How deal with hostile caller

    • Speak only with the called person?

    • How important to stay on script?

    • How respond to requests for more information

    • What do if requested to call back at another time?

    • What information to record on calling sheet, such as invalid telephone calls?

  • Re-contacting people who earlier expressed an intention to vote boosts the effectiveness of a calling campaign

  • Calls are most effective during last week prior to election (Although can use volunteer calls anytime to grow your organization.)

  • DO-not call lists do not apply to live political campaigns. Some states restrict robo-calls even for political campaigns.

Volunteer Phone Bank – key findings


Phone bank success example1

  • On a Sunday afternoon called registered Republicans within his precinct.

    • Used Voter Records to focus calls to assure they would be most productive.

  • Made thirty-six calls (4.4 minutes average per call),

    • Was able to connect with fifteen voters (42% completion rate),

    • Of these fifteen, eleven (73% success rate) were interested in joining his organization.

    • Many indicated that they would bring others to the meeting.

  • Once through script, ended up in a productive conversation.

  • Most were aware of the Tea Party movement, but had not taken the initiative to get involved.

Phone bank – success example

Ralph Kraus, leader of the Patriot Unite organization in northwest Ohio


Phone bank script1

Hello, is this _______________?

My name is _____________.

I am a neighbor of yours on ____________ street and I am a leader / member of the Tea Party / Patriot group called __________. Have you hear of Tea Parties / Our Group?

I am a conservative concerned for our country and I got involved because I had to do something to try and stop the destruction of our way of life by career politicians. They are bankrupting our country, taking over private sector businesses, and increasing the government’s control over every aspect of our lives! Like many of us, I am worried for my children and grandchildren.

We meet every other __(Day of week)____ at _____(Location)____ starting at _____(Time)___ p.m. Our objective is to get citizens, like you, to join us and educate them on what they can do.

I want to invite you, your spouse, neighbors, relatives, and friends to come and hear what we are doing locally next  __(Day and Date)___ . It is very satisfying to be united with other patriots and share in this movement to take back our country. Can I count on you to come to this meeting?

If you would be so kind to give me your e-mail address, I’ll put you on our list to keep you informed.

Thank you and have a good day/ evening / weekend.

Phone bank script


Professional phone bank

  • In contrast to volunteers calling, professional phone bank live calls produce weak effects.

  • Some findings are as follows:

    • 1 vote per 180 calls

    • $90 per additional vote, based on $0.50/completed call ( Top of line phone bank may cost $1.50/ completed call)

    • For professional phone banks, effectiveness has little to do with the specific reasons for voting stressed in scripts

    • Only 5% calls are blocked, despite caller IDs. 90% of registered voters still have land lines.

Professional phone bank


Gotv phone banking

  • Have a phone team make calls or Robo-call during the 3rd week of October to:

    • Targeted voters who were not contacted by door-to-door canvassers ( Use Blockwalker’s script )

    • Voters leaning toward voting on principles or Undecided voters and who did not receive a follow-up contact by a door-to-door canvasser

  • On Election Day

    • Contact every targeted voter who has not voted yet

    • By phone at least twice until they have voted.

    • The last call should be after 4:30 p.m.

  • Use the same script as is used by Blockwalkers on Election Day

  • Using a 30 second script, one caller can make about 50 calls per hour

Gotv phone banking


Thevoicesofamerica org precinct organizing best practices

Gotv


Gotv strategy

  • Allocating resources, time, and volunteers wisely is the key to carrying out a successful GOTV campaign operation

    • Late September – hold a GOTV planning session with the Precinct Core Team and volunteers

    • Early October – check with each volunteer who signed up to help with GOTV Strategy

    • At least 10 days before Election Day, review GOTV plan and assure each team member is clear about their role and time commitment. Review targeted Voter Record and assure that it is up to date with contact information and have GOTV entry columns.

  • Call voters who received Mail-in Ballots to assure that they are returned or to influence their vote based on principles.

    • Obtain list for these voters, who requested Mail-in Ballots, from the Board of Elections

    • In some States, can request daily e-mail lists from Board of Elections of voters requesting Mail-in ballots

    • Depending on State, Mail-in ballots are sent out 45 days ahead of Election for Military and 20 days ahead for all others

    • May need to be affiliated with party or be a candidate to obtain

    • Do not contact these voters again via methods listed below

  • Before the start of the Early Voting period

    • Robo-call or phone-bank call 100% of targeted voters

    • Go door-to-door reaching roughly 75% of targeted voters

  • Within the last 72 hours prior to Election Day

    • Robo-call or phone-bank call 100% of targeted voters

    • Go door-to-door reaching roughly 75% of targeted voters

    • Be sure to focus on targeted voters who don’t always vote (“lazy” voters)

  • On Election Day

    • 50% of targeted voters should receive calls

    • 25% of targeted voters should receive door knocks

    • Be sure to focus on targeted voters who don’t always vote (“lazy” voters)

Gotv strategy


Gotv preparation

  • Get voters to Vote Early. This allows you to use your resources more effectively.

  • Finalize the final list of targeted voters at least 10 days before Election Day.

    • Assure all contact information has been entered.

    • Assure that GOTV tracking columns exist to manage contacts during hectic final days leading up to Election Day. For example, Mail-in Ballot tracking, Early Voting tracking, and phone/ e-mail/ door-to-door contacting leading up to Election Day.

  • Identify elderly and disabled voters and provide them with Mail-in ballot applications

  • Assure all targeted voters are registered at least 30 days before election day.

  • Inform voters of election day and early voting schedule, including polling locations

    • Send postcards , Robo-call, phone-bank call, or e-mails

    • Blockwalk with handouts of this information

  • Find ride services to get voters to the polls.

Gotv preparation


Gotv blockwalking

  • Best Times for Early Voting Period

    • Contact every targeted voter who has not yet voted via Mail-in ballot

    • Weekdays

      • Target 65+ year olds for Mail-in ballots and rides to poll – have system in place to immediately provide transportation

      • Otherwise, target all other voters from 5 p.m. until dark

    • Weekends

      • Saturdays – 10 a.m. until polls close

      • Sunday – 1 p.m. until polls close

  • On Election Day

    • Contact every targeted voter who has not voted yet

    • Walk all day

    • If phoning does not get results, contact voters at their door between 4:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.

  • Election Day Discussion Script:

    • “Hi, I’m ______ (your name) working to make sure all supporters who believe in limited government, free markets, and individual freedoms vote in today’s Election. Have you voted yet?”

    • If YES – “Thanks!”

    • If NO – “Will you be able to get to the polling place at _____ by ____ p.m.?”

      • If YES – “That’s great. Every vote is extremely important!” (Remind the voter of the IDs that will be acceptable.)

      • If NO – “Every vote is extremely important – many elections are won or lost by a small margin of votes. Is there something I can do to help you get to the polls like transportation or baby sitting?” (Continue the discussion based on the reason the voter says they cannot vote.)

Gotvblockwalking


Mail in ballot gotv plan

  • Offer Mail-in Ballot Applications with stamped envelopes, addressed to the County Clerk, to all targeted voters in the precinct – explain the convenience of voting from home.

  • Within one week, follow-up with each voter who took an application to make sure it is filled out completely and mailed in time.

    • “Hello (voter’s name). This is (your name). I’m a neighborhood precinct volunteer and am just checking to see if you had a chance to get your application for a Mail-in Ballot to the County Clerk.”

    • If YES – “That’s great!”

    • If NO – “What can I do to help?”

  • If you can, monitor the County Clerk records for Clerk’s receipts of application and mailing ballot back to the voter.

  • Follow-up with voters to make sure they receive their ballots and that they mailed them back to the Clerk on time.

    • “Hello (voter’s name). This is (your name). I’m a neighborhood precinct volunteer and I am just checking to see if you have received your Mail-in Ballot from the County Clerk.”

    • If YES – “That’s great! Remember it needs to be back in the Clerk’s office by ____ (deadline).”

    • If NO – “You can check on it by calling the Clerk at (phone number). Once you receive it, you will need to get it back to the Clerk’s office by ____ (deadline).”

  • You cannot have an open Mail-in Ballot in your possession. You cannot assist the voter in filling out the ballot.

Mail-in ballot gotv plan


Early voting gotv plan

Contact every targeted voter who did not take a Mail-in Ballot Applications

Use the following script: “Hello (voter’s name). This is (your name). I’m a neighborhood precinct volunteer and I am contacting you to let you know that you can vote early on _____ (dates) at ________ (location) during ______ (times).”

If you have access to the County Clerk’s records that show if voters have early voted, then you can wait until near the end of the early voting period and then just contact those who have not yet voted.

Early voting gotv plan


Election day gotv plan

Poll checkers keep track of who has voted at the pools and feeds that information back to the precinct Election Day Team so they will know who they still need to encourage to vote.

If there will be official poll checkers, find out how you can periodically get an updated list for your precinct on Election Day.

If not, find out if you can have your own precinct volunteers at the polls, checking who votes and feeding you updated lists.

Some state laws require voter turnout totals be posted by election judge on polling place doors every two hours from 9:30 a.m. until 5:50 p.m.

Provide transportation for voters who need it

If a Mail-in ballot was not mailed in, the voter may opt to vote in person by returning the ballot to the Election Judge.

Consider having some volunteers work as election judge or clerk at polling place on Election Day to prevent voter intimidation and ensure all votes are counted.

Election day gotv plan


Flyers

Flyers


Door hangers

  • Leaflets and door hangers typically have weak effects on voter turnout

    • 1 vote per 189 registered voters

  • Leafleting less cost effective than door-to-door canvassing

    • 10 cents per leaflet

    • $12/hour to drop leaflets

    • 45 leaflets dropped per hour x 1.5 voter per address = 67.5 voters per hour

  • Door hangers that provide information about polling locations and local candidates may be more effective than standard leaflets – findings are suggestive, not significant

  • Voter list use     

    • If neighborhood with high voter registration, blind canvassing often more cost effective

    • If low voter registration, blind canvassing will waste time and paper

  • Leaflet design

    • Use visually engaging layout

    • Convey a simple clear message in large print

    • Give message credibility by including more detailed information for interested readers – direct to website or provide phone number to call

Door Hangers


Direct mail

Direct mail


Direct mail1

  • Lessons learned

    • Weak effect on voter turnout

      • 1 vote per 333 pieces of mail sent x 1.5 voters per household = 500 people

      • Mail that advocates on behalf of a candidate or issue may win votes through persuasion, not mobilization – statistical evidence though is mixed

    • Nonpartisan GOTV mail has proven more effective at mobilizing voters than partisan or advocacy mail. Partisan and advocacy mail appear to have no effect.

    • Subtle variations in message content have little effect

    • Shaming voters by showing them their own voting record and/or that of neighbors increases turnout

      • 1 vote per 20 recipients (+5% increase)

      • Showing their record and neighbors record increased by 8%, i.e. 1 vote per 12 mailings

      • Must be careful though since people may become irritated since resent snooping and scolding. May cause public outcry. (In some areas may be illegal to send neighbors voting record information.)

    • No evidence exists to support synergistic effects between mail campaigns and other GOTV tactics

  • $67 per vote at 50 cents per mailing. $100 per vote if total cost of mailing and postage is $0.75

    • Save money by sending a mailing to each household, instead of to each voter

  • Design considerations

    • Use evocative language and images to emphasize importance of voting, e.g. images of Iwo Jima to remind voters of sacrifices made to preserve the right to vote

    • Recipients only glace at mailings momentarily en route to the trash – “book” needs to be judged by its cover

    • One school of thought – homely mail gets more attention because it looks like something from a local organization or neighborhood group

  • Bulk mail considerations

    • Will save 30% postage

    •  Requires bulk mailing permit from local post office

    • By law, political direct mail gets priority over other direct mail

    • Some post offices get jammed with political mail during days leading up to elections

Direct Mail


Mass media

Mass media


Mass media1

  • Paid media, such as TV, radio, and newspaper, ads that urge voter turnout have a very small capacity to mobilize voters, i.e. 1-2% -- can’t rule out the possibility that the effects are zero

  • Televised public service announcements have disappointing effects

  • Mass media represents a potentially cost-effective means of raising turnout due to vast reach, despite small effect ( May not induce many people, but cost/vote low.)

    • TV costs are about $15/ vote

    • Radio is $7/vote

    • Newspaper is $5/ vote

  • Lowest mass media costs can be found in regions that are less affluent. (Less sales advertising creates opportunity for political advertising)

  • Most media research relies on surveys, which is flawed.

    • Viewing patterns are requested in vague terms, which introduce errors.

    • Media consumption reflects personal tastes and thus creates cause and effect issue.

Mass media


E mail

E-MaIL


E mail1

  • E-mails appear to have a negligible effect on voter turnout.

    • Personalized friend-to-friend e-mails can work on increasing turnout

  • Social connections, such as Facebook, may work as well

  • Limited tests have shown that text messaging has shown increased turnout by 2.6%

  • Nonpartisan e-mails designed to encourage voter participation has negligible effects on voter registration

  • 70% of population used e-mail in 2006. Especially high among registered voters.

  • Many e-mails are unopened. Some studies indicated an opening rate of 10-20%

  • Benefits

    • Reach large numbers at very low cost

    • E-mails can be forwarded

    • E-mail content is flexible

    • Can direct recipients to web site with valuable content

E-MAIL


Voter registration

Voter registration


When register

Year round

At least once or twice a month

Typically, Voter registration applications must be received by the county voter registrar thirty days before an election in order to vote in that election

Closer to elections, it’s best to check your state’s deadlines for voter registrations.

When Register


Where register

  • As part of door-to-door “Block Walking” with “Voter Records” or “Walk-Lists” to grow your organization, update / enhance “Voter Record” information, or to Get-Out-The-Vote for elections.

  • Churches

  • Events: Tea Party Rallies, Sporting Events, Gun Shows, Music Festivals, PTO meetings, Naturalization Ceremonies, check newspapers for events

  • Fairs: Farmer’s markets, Craft Fairs, check newspapers for fairs

  • Stores: Grocery Stores, Malls, Feed Stores, Gas Stations, Wal-Mart, Home Depot, Lowes

  • “New Movers” into your neighborhood or housing developments

  • Obtain permission from management

    • Always ask the management for permission. In many states you have a legal right to conduct Voter Registrations and laws usually prohibit charging for the right to obtain new voter registrants.

    • Start by introducing yourself to management and asking them how you can get on their calendar to set up for voter Registration for a few hours one day. Assure them that you will not impede traffic and that you simply want to provide a community service. Accommodate their requests of where to set up and assure them that you will be courteous to patrons. Ask them to give you a chance.

    • Be courteous and respectful. Be courteous with the venue’s patrons. Be a gracious guest, leave on time, and leave the area trash free.

    • Once finished, make sure to thank management for the opportunity and set up another time on their calendar to repeat the Voter Registration at a later date.

  • You will be amazed at how many people will thank you for making the effort and taking the time to conduct the Vote Registration drive.

Where register


Table supplies

  • Including petitions, political education material, political fact sheets, etc.

  • The Voter Registration table can be a venue for voter education

  • Light weight portable table, so can store in car trunk and set up quickly, and a couple of chairs.

  • Signs for petitions for which you might be gathering signatures.  Also signs with “Have you moved recently? Re-register to vote here!”

    • Will gain attention and once folks approach, you can ask them if they are registered voters.

    • If not, voila, a new voter! Helps minimize chance of registering new voters for the opposition.

    • Remind them that each time they move, change their name, or change party affiliation they have to re-register. (Depends on your state.)

  • Any clever prop to attract attention for the table, e.g. cardboard cut-out of Sarah Palin.

  • Voter Registration forms

  • Voter Registrations on clip boards

  • Pens

  • Absentee Voter or Mail-in Ballot Forms to request absentee or mail-in ballots. These can be taken home, filled out, and sent in by the requester. Make sure to pick up sufficient forms at the Board of Elections.

  • Petitions on clip boards

  • Fact sheets on political issues, legislation, or action alerts to educate public

  • Paper weights, such as rocks, to keep on all the forms and flyers

  • Have County Clerk/ Registrar’s office phone number to share with voters.

  • Cell phone number of experienced Voter Registration contact person(s)

Table supplies


Training

  • Make sure volunteers are trained – in groups or individually before starting actual registration

  • In some states, such as Ohio, all volunteers who register new voters have to become “Certified Deputy Registrars” – must be non-partisan!

    • Have the County Clerk’s office schedule a thirty minute training and certification session

    • The County Clerk’s office will provide voter registration forms and a “Deputy Voter Registrar” number.

  • You may want to contact like minded conservative organizations who have experience conducting Voter Registration drives for help preparing and training your volunteer

training


Voter registration forms

  • Obtain large quantities of Registration forms at the County Board of Elections/ County Clerk/ Registrar’s Office

    • Inform them that you are a member of a volunteer organization who will be pursuing registration drives

    • They may require you to complete a distribution form (depends on state). On it you will need to indicate that you are a volunteer, are familiar with the voter registration laws, and where you are planning to conduct registration drives.

  • Obtain the instruction sheet for How to Properly Complete the Voter Registration Card. This information is also typically available on the Secretary of State’s website for your state.

  • Also familiarize yourself with likely errors made on Voter Registrations and most common questions new registrants might ask. This information can be obtained either by asking at the Board of Election etc. or by going to the Secretary of State website.

  • Forms must be completed by new registrants legibly and correctly. It assures that all fields are filled in if the spaces are highlighted by volunteers beforehand. Voter Registration volunteers should double check each form, once completed.

  • At large rallies or venues, which may draw voters from many counties or even accross state lines, make sure you have correct Voter Registration forms for each of the locations. Some states have different Voter Registration forms for each county.

Voter registration forms


Handling completed forms

Assure that the Voter Registration form is filled out completely and legibly. Forms can be refused even for a single mistake, such as being incomplete, illegible, or entries are crossed out. Make sure the form is signed.

As the person doing the registration, in some states you may be required to enter information on the Registration Forms, such as your name, phone number, and signature. Some organizations use an ink signature stamp for this purpose. Do not pre-stamp unfilled forms beforehand.

In some states, you will need to detach a receipt from the bottom of the form and hand it to the new registrant. Inform the new registrant to keep the receipt until they are informed by the County Clerk or Registrar that they are registered to vote.

At the Voter Registration table, store all completed forms in a safe place. Do not leave them unattended.

Depending on the state, the Voter Registration must be submitted, either by mail or dropped off at the Registrar’s Office, within a certain number of days. For example, in California it’s three days.

Focus on registering like-minded conservative new voters. Selection of venue can increase the probability of encountering these conservative folks, but you may at times have to deal with big-government liberals who want to register to vote. When you do encounter them, remember that you are only obligated to give everyone who asks a Voter Registration form. You are not obligated to assume responsibility for submitting it to the Board of Elections. You can instead simply hand the completed Voter Registration form to the big-government liberal and request that they submit it themselves to the Board of Elections. Be sure not to place any of your organization’s information on the form, in which case you would have assumed responsibility to submit it to the Board of Elections.

Handling completed forms


Watch outs

It’s against federal law to give anything away of value in exchange for a registration at your table. You can distribute educational fliers.

It’s ok to discuss politics, but do not engage in heated political discussions. Just smile and politely end the conversation with big government liberals. They will go away.

Watch-outs


Candidates

candidates


Political parties

“However [political parties] may now and then answer popular ends, they are likely in the course of time and things, to become potent engines, by which cunning, ambitious, and unprincipled men will be enabled to subvert the power of the people and to usurp for themselves the reins of government, destroying afterwards the very engines which have lifted them to unjust dominion”.

GEORGE WASHINGTON, Farewell Address, Sep. 17, 1796

Political Parties


Candidates1

  • “The Voices of America”methodology requires:

    • Constitutionally-grounded political candidates

    • Who support limited government, free markets, and individual freedoms.

  • Informed constituents in each district will base vote on:

    • Which candidate best adheres to these Constitutional principles

    • Has the best chance of getting elected so that they can implement these principles.

  • Sources of Good Candidates

    • Independents –GOOOH and former, defecting Republicans

    • “Tea Party” Republicans

    • Ask Republican voters not to “split the vote” and elect Democrats

    • Otherwise, vote Republican, until their “day of reckoning” comes

Candidates


Candidate vetting with voter guides

Homemakers of America’s Abigail Adams Project is creating non-partisan Voter Guides to assure that candidates who support Constitutional principles and values are elected.

It is a nationwide voter initiative to provide information to the voters on the candidates, i.e. who they are and where they stand on the issues from the President of the United States all the way down to the school board in every city, county, and state in the nation. 

These Voter Guides can be disseminated before elections by organizations’ volunteers who go door-to-door using the precinct organizing methodology.

This non-partisan Voter Guide concept has been tested for the past four general elections in Dayton, Ohio and it has been phenomenal in what a difference it made.

Homemakers of America has partnered with national organizations such as “As A Mom”, “Family Security Matters”, and with state organizations such as 9/12 and Tea Parties.

They would welcome volunteers from any like-minded organization to help with the creation of these Voter Guides.

Candidate vetting with voter guides


Candidate vetting with townhalls

  • Audience members ask questions of the candidate in a real time fashion.

    • When audience members enter the townhall event, ask if would like to ask a question.

    • Give them a card to fill out with their name.

  • Before getting started each candidate will have 5 minutes to voice his/her reasons for running  

  • In order to maintain objectivity

    • Ask a member of the audience to select cards at random

    • The person selected from the card will be allowed to direct questions to the participants.

  • Each candidate will then have 3 minutes to answer the question.

    • The person asking the question will have an opportunity to ask one follow up question, if desired.

    • That person may ask a different candidate the same question or a follow up with the original candidate

  • Any question directed to the candidate with a yes or no requested answer will be required to answer with a yes or no.

    • The candidate will then be given the allotted 3 minutes to explain his/her position.

  • At the end of the question and answer period each candidate will have 3 minutes for a closing statement. 

  • After the event compile a voter guide from all questions and answers to distribute throughout the precinct.

Candidate vetting with townhalls


Reclaim parties via precinct executives

Precinct Organizing can be leveraged to elect Constitution principle based candidates to Precinct Executive positions of either Party.

If elected, Precinct Executives can run for higher offices within each Party’s organizational structure with ever increasing influence over Party candidate selection and election funding.

The outcome should be more Constitutional principle based candidates from each of these Parties.

While, Precinct Executives elected in May, 2010 will not be able to impact Party candidate selection and funding for the November, 2010 election, they should be able to have an impact on the 2012 elections. 

Many of these positions are currently vacant and you have a 30-50% chance to run for this position unopposed.

Reclaim parties via precinct executives


Precinct organizing confusion

Precinct organizing confusion

2010

Election

2012

Election

Patriot

Organization

Precinct

Organizing

Political Party

Precinct

Central Committee

County

State

National

Candidate


How to become a precinct executive

  • Obtain a Precinct member petition from the Board of Election in your county

    • Need 5 names within your party, recommend 15

  • Return your signed petition by February 18th in Ohio

  • Campaign from February until Primary Election on May 4th, 2010 in Ohio

    • Call Board of Election to see if running uncontested, which happens regularly, sometimes ½ of the time nationwide. When vacant, people are appointed.

    • If have a challenger, use available Voter Records to engage regular primary voters for party you’re running for at least 3 times before election

    • Most precincts decided by less than 400 votes

How to become a Precinct Executive


Party organization

  • The Party’s leadership is elected every two years. In Ohio this opportunity not available again until 2012

  • The Party’s COUNTY CENTRAL COMMITTEE is elected at the first meeting of PRECINCT EXECUTIVES

    • In a small county, all the precinct executives make up the Central Committee

    • In a large county, the elected Central Committee represents the party.

    • Made up of one person from a city ward (12 connected precincts) or a member of a county’s township.

  • ELECTED COUNTY LEADERS ELECT STATE LEADERSHIP

    • 1 month after the COUNTY CENTRAL COMMITTEE is elected, they elect the county leaders [have the power to appoint] who form the COUNTY EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

    • 1 month later the county leaders elect the 50 State party leaders

    • 1 month later the 50 State party leaders elect the National party leader [procedures vary from state to state]

  • PARTY LEADERS

    • Make the party rules

    • Can stop the corruption in the board of election

    • Decide how the votes are counted and eliminate vote fraud

    • Choose the candidates and determine how the presidential primary is run

    • Decide whose name appears on the Official Party Voter Guide which is delivered to the Party faithful

  • party organization


    Universal voter registration

    Universal voter registration


    Democratic 2010 election strategy

    • Universal Voter Registration

      • Override all state election laws

      • Force states to register everyone to vote

        • On welfare

        • Unemployed

        • Has a driver’s license,

        • Is a property owner

      • Many people on these lists are duplicates and many are illegal aliens.

    Democratic 2010 election Strategy


    2008 election incompetence or fraud

    • George Soros’ Secretary of State Project pre-2008

      • Targeted funding efforts on Secretary of State Races in seven swing states ( included OH & MN)

      • In collaboration with ACORN’s Project Vote, Vote from Home and other programs.

    • Actions and Decisions made by Ohio’s Secretary of State

      • In 2006, re-interpreted Ohio Election Statutes and created the “Golden Week” – Register & Vote at same time

        • Ordered the unprepared and understaffed County Election Boards to set up voting centers that would assure a massive turnout

        • Banned all poll-watchers from the vote centers.

      • 600,000 new voters registered

        • Declined to enforce reconciling provision of the “Help America Vote Act

        • Admitted that known “discrepancies” existed for about 200,000 registrations

      • Federal U.S District judge ruled that breaking federal law

        • Overruled in a split decision by the 6th Circuit Court of Appeals on a technicality – no private lawsuits

      • Sought to invalidate a million signed, absentee-ballot applications issued by the McCain campaign,

        • Technical issue of inadvertently having an extra, unnecessary checkbox.

        • The Ohio Supreme Court later overturned this Secretary of State’s directive.

    • Ohio NET

      • Obama won by ~270,000 votes

      • ACORN paid $800,000 to register new voters

    2008 election – incompetence or fraud?


    Silent majority can win elections1

    • 76% Of Electorate Are Like-Minded

      • 40% are Conservative

      • 36% are Moderate

      • 20% are Liberal

    • Conservatives Now Outnumber Liberals in All 50 States

    “SILENT MAJORITY” can win elections

    October 26, 2009 Gallup Poll


    65 now hold populist or mainstream views

    Only four 4% now support the Political Class

    Skeptical of big government

    Republicans and Independent voters are more likely to hold Mainstream views

    51% of Democrats hold such views

    65% Now Hold Populist, or Mainstream, Views

    Source: Rasmussen Report , January 31, 2010


    Get organized

    Get organized


    Organizational capability matrix

    Organizational capability matrix

    Individual Organizations Are Responsible For Their Actions

    Northeast

    Alliance

    Northwest

    Alliance

    Central

    Alliance

    Southeast

    Alliance

    Southwest

    Alliance

    Enabling Organization

    Is Responsible for

    Best Practices

    Individual Organization

    Individual Organization

    Individual Organization

    Individual Organization

    Individual Organization

    Individual Organization

    Individual Organization

    Individual Organization

    Individual Organization

    Individual Organization

    Individual Organization

    Individual Organization

    Precinct Organizing

    Voter Guides

    Precinct Executive Election Process

    Facilitate Decision Making Process for Common Actions


    Precinct organizing coordination

    Precinct Organizing Coordination

    • Responsibilities

    • Use of Best Practices

    • Training

    • Resource Coordination for GOTV

    • Funding & Enabling

    State

    Enabling & Coordinating

    Board

    Regional

    Enabling & Coordinating

    Board

    Regional

    Enabling & Coordinating

    Board

    County

    Enabling & Coordinating

    Board

    County

    Enabling & Coordinating

    Board

    County

    Enabling & Coordinating

    Board

    Precinct

    Coordinators

    Precinct

    Coordinators

    Precinct

    Coordinators

    Precinct

    Coordinators

    Precinct

    Coordinators

    Precinct

    Coordinators

    Precinct

    Coordinators

    Precinct

    Coordinators

    Precinct

    Coordinators


    Structure election terms

    • Each county shall be represented by all patriot groups unless a group decides to not join with the other groups in said county, a minimum of at least 5 representatives. Each county group representative shall be selected by a majority vote in the county group they are to represent. They shall be seated for a term of 2 years.

      • In counties where there are not 5 patriot groups, members shall elect one person per group with the remainder being at large positions.

    • The state of Ohio, having been divided into five regions for the purpose of training, would retain the regions for representation purposes. Each region would have a 5 member board appointed from the ranks of the individual counties, on a rotating basis, in alphabetical order from A to Z for terms lasting 2 years.

    • The state governing body shall be comprised of 10 members selected from each of the 5 regions, two members from each. The representatives shall be selected from the membership of the member counties in the state, or from the ranks of the governing board of the county or region, with the 2 candidates receiving the most votes being seated for a term of 2 years.

    • At each level a chairman shall be elected by the members of the committee to preside over all meetings. Where possible rules of order are to be adhered to with all decisions being made by a secret ballot with a 2/3rd majority present being a quorum.

    Structure- election & terms


    Structure limitations

    In order to limit the building of power bases it is advised that no person running for public office, in a public office, or having been in a public office, shall hold a state or regional position. They may however represent their individual groups in their respective county.

    Using a position in the organization as a spring board for public office is to be discouraged.

    If a person in any leadership capacity in the organization decides to run for public office they are to resign as soon as their decision has been made. If they fail to be elected for public office they will be eligible to hold office at the time of the next election for county, regional, or state representative.

    Structure - limitations


    Structure finances

    • Each county shall form a 501(c) 4 for the purpose of recruiting and the general needs of the county group as described by the 501 (c) 4 rules set forth by the Ohio Secretary of State.

    • All required filings are to be forwarded to the appropriate governmental divisions in a timely manor.

    • The 10 member state committee shall possess a 501 (c) 4 for the support of state board functions where allowed by state law.

      • They shall also have a 501 (c) 3 for the purpose of receiving tax deductible donations. These monies will be used to inform and educate the voting public about candidates, voter guides and candidate nights, as well as supporting the counties with educational material and financing educational meetings pertaining to issues and legislation in the state of Ohio and before the congress of the United States.

      • All educational efforts will be made in a non partisan way and will not favor one party over the other. All 501 (c) 3 rules will be strictly adhered to and all filings will be made in a timely manor

    Structure - finances


    Faithful action1

    Faithful action


    Faithful action2

    OBJECTIVE

    • Limited government, free markets, and individual liberties (including freedom of religion in the public square)

      GOAL

    • Win back the House and the Senate in November , 2010 with more conservative politicians

    • Win back the Presidency in 2012 with a conservative candidate

    • Keep pressure on all politicians to achieve objective – will take time.

    Faithful Action


    Background

    • Religious organizations have been:

      • Excluded from political process via misunderstanding and excuse of 501(c)(3) non-profit status

      • Assaulted in public square by government funded third parties, under the 1976 Civil Rights Attorneys Fee Act.

        • Current assaults: public funding of abortions, eliminate National Day of Prayer, and new Hate Crime Bill.

      • All this is contrary to Alexis de Tocqueville’s observations in mid 1800’s in Democracy in America, in which he writes extensively about the marriage of religion and politics in America

    • If the socialization of America is not stopped, Religion will be replaced by an omnipotent, secular-humanist socialist government, as evidenced in socialist Europe where churches are empty.

      • A.D. Lindsay in his classic 1943 study, The Modern Democratic State, writes: “It was perhaps equally important that the existence and prestige of the Church prevented society from being totalitarian, prevented the omnicompetent state, and preserved liberty in the only way that liberty can be preserved, by maintaining in society an organization which could stand up against the state.”

    • As a call to political responsibility, in late 2007 the U.S. Catholic Bishops started a “Faithful Citizenship” initiative.

      • The Bishops state that: “In the Catholic Tradition, responsible citizenship is a virtue, and participation in political life is a moral obligation”. Pope Benedict XVI calls political activity, “social charity”.

    • People of faith represent a large, underutilized voting block and of potential volunteers (African-American churches being the exception.) - resource http://www.barna.org/

      • 68 million Catholics; 100+ million Evangelicals. 80% tend to be conservative?

      • Low turnout for Evangelical Christians in 2008 and 2006, after largest turnout of in 2004. Liberals regained both houses and won the Presidency in 2008.

    background


    Strategy ohio event template

    • Mobilize people of faith to join with patriot organizations and pursue non-partisan and non-religious precinct organizing, candidate nights, and voter guides.

    • Conduct regional events to provide background, motivation, education, and activism training geared towards faith based audience

    • Recruit faith based attendees by working around priests and ministers, who resist political involvement, by using church community social networks, church directories, and precinct organizing methods to identify interested church members

    • Start with people of faith in existing patriot organizations to initiate process

    • Start with central Ohio event drawing on whole state, using existing patriot network to recruit people of faith. ( “As Ohio goes, so goes the nation…”; Ohio motto “With God, All Things Are Possible”)

    • Take national via existing national patriot networks and The Voices Of America website, which is getting much national traction

    Strategy – Ohio Event Template


    Action

    • Plan 4 hour session to provide background, motivation, education, and activism training

      • Mount Vernon Theater (Seats 1000; As of 4/9 - Sundays May 16,23,30 and June 6,13,20) 740-393-6703

    • Agenda / Speakers

      • Master of Ceremonies – Warren Edstrom, The Voices Of America

      • Entertainment – TBD /Patriotic and/ or contemporary religious

      • Motivational / Background / History/ Perspective

        • Thomas Tabback – author, etc. (www.pearlgate.org) – Founders, Religion, and Civic Duty

        • Catholic Speaker – TBD / Suggested - Brian Rooney (www.runwithrooney.com) & Tom Brinkman

        • Evangelical Speaker – TBD / Suggested – Clint Zeigler

      • Relevant Legal Matters – TBD / via Maurice Thomson ?

      • Civic Training

        • Precinct Organizing – Peter Wolf, The Voices Of America

        • Candidate Townhalls – Warren Edstrom, The Voices Of America

        • Voter Guides – Kimberly Fletcher, Homemakers of America & Abigail Adams Project

        • Testimonial/ Anecdotal Examples – Ralph Kraus

        • Internet Activism – TBD

    action


    Example

    • 1998 Kansas State Board of Education (Religious Activism)

      • Election created a 6 to 4 conservative majority

      • Achieved via Precinct Organizing of hundreds of churchgoers in low-turnout Republican primaries

      • A year later, the Board in August, 1999 dropped evolution from science education, allowing local school boards to decide what to teach

      • When groups such as conservative Christians or elderly Americans vote in large numbers, policymakers take their concerns seriously

    example


    Campaign consultants

    Campaign consultants


    Why not pursue what works

    The most effective methodology to get-out-the-vote for elections is door-to-door canvassing.

    The second most effective method is to have passionate and informed volunteers make personalized calls to registered voters.  

    Despite this, these Precinct Organizing methodologies are no longer much pursued by parties since parties want centralized control of campaign resources and the message.

    Additionally, campaign consultants profit more with brokered mass media, phone banks, and direct mail. 

    Nevertheless, Organizing for America did pursue limited Precinct Organizing for the 2008 election with much success and with particular focus on registering new Democratic voters, much of it via outsourcing to ACORN.

    Why not pursue what works?


    Data based key findings

    • Campaign managers are able to protect their reputation by employing well-accepted, profitable, but inefficient campaign tactics since everyone is doing it and someone has to win the election.

    • But, just because everyone is doing it does not mean that it works.

    • Relevant key findings based on statistical analyses are as follows:

      • Experts rarely measure effectiveness

      • Experts may report speculations in the guise of “findings”, which should be suspect

      • Seasoned campaign veterans know a great deal about the inputs, but they seldom possess reliable information about outputs

      • Publications tend to play up what works in getting out the vote, since not likely to report studies which show no effect – known as “publication bias”

      • Research debunks claims of synergy  for varying campaign tactics

      • It’s more difficult to study voter choice than voter turnout.

      • Only randomized experiments with randomized assignments assure fair comparisons – flip coin to decide who receives treatment

        • Rare in politics, as are successful third party candidates

        • Voting is measured by examining public records, not by asking people whether they voted

        • Subject voting rates to statistical analyses & replicate experiment in other times and places

    Data based Key findings


    Statistically based votes contact

    • Actual, statistically based determinations of campaign effectiveness for various candidate or issue get-out-the-vote tactics are: (Assumes that voters are not already passionately engaged in the political process as they are now with the threat to their liberties by an ever larger government and assault on free markets.)

      • Door-to-door canvassing – 1 vote gained per 14 contacts ( assumes a normal 50% voting rate)

      • Volunteer phone-bank – 1 vote per 38 contacts ( Talented volunteers or calls within last week prior to elections can increase success rate to 1 vote per 20 completed calls)

      • Professional phone bank – 1 vote per 180 calls

      • Leaflets – 1 vote per 189 voters

      • Direct mail – 1 vote per 333 pieces of mail sent

      • Robo-calls – 1 vote per 1000 calls

      • Mass media – 1-2%, but can’t rule out the that the effects are zero (Low cost/ vote ratio due to broad reach and relative low cost for media, but actual total mobilized voters are low. Most media research relies on surveys, which is flawed.)

    Statistically based votes / contact


    Books

    books


    Take back your government

    This is intended to be a practical manual of instruction for the American layman who has taken no regular part in politics, has no personal political ambitions, and no desire to make money out of politics, but who, nevertheless, would like to do something to make his or her chosen form of government work better.

    If you have a gnawing, uneasy feeling that you should be doing something to preserve our freedoms and to protect and improve our way of life but have been held back by lack of time, lack of money, or the helpless feeling that you individually could not do enough to make the effort worthwhile, then this book was written for you.

    The individual, unpaid and inexperienced volunteer citizen can take this country away from the career politicians and run it to suit himself—if he knows how to go about it.

    “Take Back Your Government!”


    Get out the vote how to increase voter turnout

    The first edition of Get Out the Vote! broke ground by introducing a new scientific approach to the challenge of voter mobilization and profoundly influenced how campaigns operate.

    In this expanded and updated edition, the authors incorporate data from more than one hundred new studies, which shed new light on the cost-effectiveness and efficiency of various campaign tactics, including door-to-door canvassing, e-mail, direct mail, and telephone calls.

    Two new chapters focus on the effectiveness of mass media campaigns and events such as candidate forums and Election Day festivals.

    … this practical guide on voter mobilization is sure to be an important resource for consultants, candidates, and grassroots organizations.

    Get Out The Vote: How to Increase Voter Turnout


    Dnc portrayal of conservatives

    Dnc portrayal of conservatives


    Thevoicesofamerica org precinct organizing best practices

    Source: Colorado Think Precinct


    Thevoicesofamerica org precinct organizing best practices

    Source: Colorado Think Precinct


    Thevoicesofamerica org precinct organizing best practices

    Source: Kansas GOP, 1/09


    Background slides

    Background slides


    Thevoicesofamerica org precinct organizing best practices

    • “Leaders” Tabs

    • How Create Team

    • Leadership Meetings

    • Training Agenda

    • Fundraising

    • “Volunteers” Tabs

    • Volunteer Logistics

    • Recruitment

    • Meeting Logistics

    • Meeting Agenda

    • Meeting Tips

    • Capability Tabs

    • “TOOLS” Tab

      • Key Voter Data

      • Excel Importation

      • Registering New Voters

    • “NotifyNOW” Tab

      • Robo-call Script


    Thevoicesofamerica org precinct organizing best practices

    • “APPROACH” Tabs

    • Planning

    • Timing

    • Materials Needed

    • Optimum Times

    • No One Home

    • Rural Plan

    • College Plan

    • Do’s

    • Don’ts

    • “Talking Points” Tabs

    • Blockwalk Script

    • Discussion Tips

    • Sample Responses

    • “GOTV” Tabs

    • Preparation

    • Blockwalking

    • Phone

    • Mail-in Ballots

    • Early Voting

    • Election Day


    65 now hold populist or mainstream views1

    Only four 4% now support the Political Class

    Skeptical of big government

    Republicans and Independent voters are more likely to hold Mainstream views

    51% of Democrats hold such views

    65% Now Hold Populist, or Mainstream, Views

    Source: Rasmussen Report , January 31, 2010


    Broad appeal relevance of patriot organization principles

    • 65% think the national debt is the greatest potential threat to the country’s future

    • 79% of voters think that it is possible the economy could collapse, including large majorities of Democrats (72%), Republicans (84%), and Independents (80%).

    • 84% of Republicans and 74% of Independents think the government is too big; while just over half of Democrats (51%) are okay with the size of government.

    • “80% of Americans say they can’t trust Washington” - Pew Research on April 18, 2010

    • 56% of people say they think the federal government has become so large and powerful that it poses an immediate threat to the rights and freedoms of ordinary citizens. Breakdowns by party affiliation, of those who believe this, are: 37% of Democrats, 63% Independents, and 70% Republicans.

    • 63% of likely voters believe that it would be better for the country if most incumbents in Congress were defeated this November. 

    Broad Appeal & Relevance of Patriot organization Principles


    Where the tea partiers should go from here

    Citizen’s Pledge:

    Educate themselves about key issues of health care, spending, deficits and the economy.

    Ascertain with certainty where candidates for the U.S. Senate and House stand on these issues.

    Agree to register and then vote this fall for candidates they personally believe best represent their views on issues.

    Make a manageable list of 10 to 25 people whom they would individually approach to take the pledge.

    Personally see that each of their recruits register and vote.

    Karl Rove, Wall Street Journal Opinion Page, April 1, 2010

    “Where the Tea Partiers Should Go From Here”


    What you can do to help win in 2010

    • Conventional top-down media-driven political campaign isn’t working anymore because we don’t believe what we hear from strangers.

      • Our politicians suffer from a huge credibility gap.

      • We attach virtually no credibility to paid political ads.

    • The more we disbelieve those we don’t know, the more we do believe, and rely upon, those we do know.

      • The old regimen of media propaganda is swiftly being supplanted by old-fashioned word of mouth–recommendations from friends, trusted colleagues, and established, credible commentators–as our main source of information.

    • You are the campaign!

      • Each of us must conduct our own campaign within our own circle of acquaintances, until the circle spreads to include thousands of voters.

      • Our audience is a large circle of people and we’re at its center. We have school and college buddies, office colleagues, family members (even if we have to climb pretty far out on the family tree), members of civic and fraternal groups, clients, social friends, and other associates.

      • If you want to make a difference in 2010, now’s the time to start reaching out to all those people to spread the word. They are your constituents–your electronic precinct.

    What you can do to help win in 2010

    Dick Morris & Eileen McGann – April 15, 2010, based on book “Take Back America – A Battle Plan”


    Voter contact effectiveness

    Voter contact effectiveness

    Source: Colorado Precinct Project - http://www.thinkprecinct.com/


    Electoral votes by state

    Electoral Votes by state


    Grow your organization

    Grow your organization

    Easier to recruit & excite

    with non-partisan message and specific tasks

    From: www.democracyforamerica.com


    Start with robo call canvassing

    • Call all targeted voters in precinct

      • Easy and fast method to reach many voters

      • Able to update voter records by finding numbers that are no longer in service

      • Leave call back messages

    • Messages can be used for:

      • Assuring people "they are not alone“

      • Invite them to join your organization

      • Alerting people of important meetings

      • Get-Out-The-Vote on election day

    • Preferred supplier provides capability to us at 4 cents per 60 second call.

      • Calling 1,100 people in a precinct  costs only $44.

      • Tom Zawistowski at 1-800-846-4630 Ext 104 or e-mail him at [email protected]

    Start with robo-call Canvassing


    Robo call script

    Hello, my name is _____ .I am a concerned citizen from your neighborhood who is troubled by how politicians of both parties are bankrupting our country and are jeopardizing our children’s and grandchildren’s future.

    If you are concerned about what is going on in Washington, I would welcome your involvement with our community group focused on electing candidates who believe in Constitutional Principles of limited government, free markets, and individual freedoms.

    Together we can make a difference!

    Please call me at _________ or e-mail me at _______.

    Robo-call script


    District strategic focus

    district strategic focus

    Note: Wilson( OH-6) & Space (OH-18) are Blue Dog Democrats

    Thanks to Dan Lillback of the Cincinnati Tea Party


    Voter record special needs

    • Determine Precinct if not in Voter Record

      • Use ZIP codes and Google maps to identify precincts.

      • Need four digit extensions for ZIP codes.

      • Can get from US Post Office web site with addresses.

    • Determine Phone numbers if not in Voter Record

      • Use …

    Voter record Special Needs


    Flyer issues vs constitution

    Flyer – Issues vs. Constitution


    Incumbent representatives out of touch

    • 57% Would Like to Replace Entire Congress

      • Just 25% of voters nationwide would keep the current batch of legislators

      • Just 14% give Congress good or excellent review for their overall performance

    • 74% trust their own economic judgment more than that of Congress

    • 75% say members of Congress are more interested in their own careers

    incumbent Representatives out Of Touch

    Source: August 30, 2009 Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey.


    Re election 90 vs expected 50

    • More than 90% of Congress routinely gets reelected

    • 50% say “rigged” election rules explain high reelection rules for Congress

  • When the Constitution was written, the nation’s founders expected that there would be a 50% turnover in the House of Representatives every election cycle.

  • Re-election – 90% vs. Expected 50%

    Source: August 30, 2009 Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey.


    Republicans are a damaged brand

    • 69% of GOP Voters Say Republicans in Congress Out of Touch With The Party Base ( May & August, 2009 Rasmussen national telephone survey.)

      • Just 21% of GOP voters believe Republicans in Congress have done a good job representing their own party’s values.

    • 28% of respondents had positive feelings about the Republican Party (August 25th Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll)

      • Compared with 42% for Democrats.

    Republicans are a “damaged brand”


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