Leading Change

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Leading Change

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3. Welcome Back

4. Change is a fact is anxiety is a tool Discovery Experience “Has anyone experienced any changes during this Wood Badge course?” Touch on the Following Experiencing Changes Ask participants: “Has anyone experienced any changes during this Wood Badge course?” Entertain a few responses. Touch on the following ideas: The change from being Cub Scouts when you first arrived here to becoming members of Troop 1 as Boy Scouts. That’s a change most of us see in youth we serve as they make the transition from one Scouting program to the next. Changes in team development. Each patrol has been going through the stages of becoming a high-performing team — changes that lead to important goals. The change in location of this part of the Wood Badge course. You may have become settled with the surroundings and routine that had become familiar during the first days of the course. What has it been like to make these changes?Discovery Experience “Has anyone experienced any changes during this Wood Badge course?” Touch on the Following Experiencing Changes Ask participants: “Has anyone experienced any changes during this Wood Badge course?” Entertain a few responses. Touch on the following ideas: The change from being Cub Scouts when you first arrived here to becoming members of Troop 1 as Boy Scouts. That’s a change most of us see in youth we serve as they make the transition from one Scouting program to the next. Changes in team development. Each patrol has been going through the stages of becoming a high-performing team — changes that lead to important goals. The change in location of this part of the Wood Badge course. You may have become settled with the surroundings and routine that had become familiar during the first days of the course. What has it been like to make these changes?

5. Change Happens Objectives of Leading Change: Make it happen When Change is needed, leading change can make it happen. Make it positive When change is inevitable, leading change can make it positive Objectives on Leading Change Change Happens! Let’s say that again... change happens, it is inevitable! In many areas of our lives the speed at which change occurs is increasing. What choices do we have in how we react to change? (pause) Communications is the Key! We can be fearful of change and resistant to it, but that allows change to control us. We can accept changes and try to make the most of them. That’s better, but it causes us to adapt to changes that are already occurring. We can lead change by taking responsibility for steering changes in the best possible directions. That approach not only accepts change, but also does something about determining the outcome of change. Objectives on Leading Change Change Happens! Let’s say that again... change happens, it is inevitable! In many areas of our lives the speed at which change occurs is increasing. What choices do we have in how we react to change? (pause) Communications is the Key! We can be fearful of change and resistant to it, but that allows change to control us. We can accept changes and try to make the most of them. That’s better, but it causes us to adapt to changes that are already occurring. We can lead change by taking responsibility for steering changes in the best possible directions. That approach not only accepts change, but also does something about determining the outcome of change.

6. How to Lead Change Step #1: — Recognize that change happens… Anticipate change Accept change Move along Step #1: Recognize that change Happens Anticipate change Change happens. And once change happens, change will happen again. Realizing that change is inevitable helps people begin looking for the effects that changes have upon their lives. They can then begin to explore the opportunities they have for shaping the results of change. Accept change When you see change happening, adapt to it. The more quickly you let go of the old way of doing things and accept the new, the sooner you can enjoy the opportunities the new situation presents. What are the advantages of changing? What are the consequences of changing? Move along Move along with change. Enjoy change. Savor the adventure and enjoy what change can offer. Once a change has occurred, be ready for change to happen again, and be ready to enjoy that change, too.Step #1: Recognize that change Happens Anticipate change Change happens. And once change happens, change will happen again. Realizing that change is inevitable helps people begin looking for the effects that changes have upon their lives. They can then begin to explore the opportunities they have for shaping the results of change. Accept change When you see change happening, adapt to it. The more quickly you let go of the old way of doing things and accept the new, the sooner you can enjoy the opportunities the new situation presents. What are the advantages of changing? What are the consequences of changing? Move along Move along with change. Enjoy change. Savor the adventure and enjoy what change can offer. Once a change has occurred, be ready for change to happen again, and be ready to enjoy that change, too.

7. How to Lead Change Step #2: — Empower others to help you lead change. Empower others Who is involved Shared experiences Step #2: Empower others to help you lead change. Empower others Change is much easier to lead when others buy in to new ideas and become supporting players in developing a positive future. Who is involved Consider who needs to be involved. The right coalition of people can lead change with great dispatch and effectiveness. Seek out people who: Have a willingness to change things for the better. Have the position, expertise, and/or credibility to enact change. Have the leadership and management skills to guide change. Shared experiences 2. Build relationships through shared experience. In some situations you can build the coalition of people helping to lead change. At other times, the people are already in place, and you must lead change through them even if they may at first be reluctant. In either case, relationships built on shared experiences will lead to the most positive opportunities for change to occur. We’ve seen this happening all week at Wood Badge. The better you have gotten to know members of your patrol, the stronger your team has become. The more we do with one another, the better we understand each other’s strengths. We learn what to expect of one another. We develop trust. Shared experiences give us common ground for embracing and moving with change.Step #2: Empower others to help you lead change. Empower others Change is much easier to lead when others buy in to new ideas and become supporting players in developing a positive future. Who is involved Consider who needs to be involved. The right coalition of people can lead change with great dispatch and effectiveness. Seek out people who: Have a willingness to change things for the better. Have the position, expertise, and/or credibility to enact change. Have the leadership and management skills to guide change. Shared experiences 2. Build relationships through shared experience. In some situations you can build the coalition of people helping to lead change. At other times, the people are already in place, and you must lead change through them even if they may at first be reluctant. In either case, relationships built on shared experiences will lead to the most positive opportunities for change to occur. We’ve seen this happening all week at Wood Badge. The better you have gotten to know members of your patrol, the stronger your team has become. The more we do with one another, the better we understand each other’s strengths. We learn what to expect of one another. We develop trust. Shared experiences give us common ground for embracing and moving with change.

8. How to Lead Change “Where do you want to go?” Where to you want to Go? Alice in Wonderland comes to a fork in the road and asks the Cheshire Cat which she should take. “Where do you want to go?” the Cheshire Cat asks her. “ I don’t know,” she replies. “Well,” says the cat, “then either way will get you there, won’t it?” To Lead change, we need to know where we are headed. The tools for finding that direction and staying on course are vision and mission based on a clear sense of the personal and organizational values.Where to you want to Go? Alice in Wonderland comes to a fork in the road and asks the Cheshire Cat which she should take. “Where do you want to go?” the Cheshire Cat asks her. “ I don’t know,” she replies. “Well,” says the cat, “then either way will get you there, won’t it?” To Lead change, we need to know where we are headed. The tools for finding that direction and staying on course are vision and mission based on a clear sense of the personal and organizational values.

9. How to Lead Change Step #3: — Lead change based on… Values: Core beliefs Vision: Picture of future success Plan: Steps to realize Your vision Step #3: Lead change based on Vision, Mission, & Values Values are core beliefs or desires that guide and motivate our attitudes and actions. The values of Scouting, for example, are embedded in the Scout Oath and Scout Law. Values are the standards we use for leading change. They keep us moving in the right direction. Serving as a moral compass, they let us know whether changes we are considering are right or wrong. If a change is wrong, our values can help us lead that change toward a more appropriate resolution. Vision is a picture of future success. A vision forms when we think far enough ahead to realize there will be important challenges that we can prepare for now, perhaps by doing something as simple as planting a few acorns. What does vision have to do with leading change? It allows us to visualize the end result. It inspires us with the possibilities of what might be. Visions President John F Kennedy’s challenge of going to the moon Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s dream of a more inclusive society Margaret Thatcher’s understanding of vision as a tool of leadership A Scout leader’s determination to develop a strong year-round outdoor program, or to conduct an effective membership drive, or to involve more parents in leadership positions On Day One, we talked about both vision and mission. How would you accomplish the vision? With a plan. A plan is made up of the steps that lead to the realization of a vision. A plan with goals is the nuts-and-bolts part of leading change. It is the blueprint for making the changes that will fulfill the vision. Effective leaders have the capacity to create a compelling vision, but they must also be able to translate that vision into reality. A clearly defined plan allows them to make that happen. When we discussed vision and mission on Day One, we did so in the context of values. ‘What are values? Step #3: Lead change based on Vision, Mission, & Values Values are core beliefs or desires that guide and motivate our attitudes and actions. The values of Scouting, for example, are embedded in the Scout Oath and Scout Law. Values are the standards we use for leading change. They keep us moving in the right direction. Serving as a moral compass, they let us know whether changes we are considering are right or wrong. If a change is wrong, our values can help us lead that change toward a more appropriate resolution. Vision is a picture of future success. A vision forms when we think far enough ahead to realize there will be important challenges that we can prepare for now, perhaps by doing something as simple as planting a few acorns. What does vision have to do with leading change? It allows us to visualize the end result. It inspires us with the possibilities of what might be. Visions President John F Kennedy’s challenge of going to the moon Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s dream of a more inclusive society Margaret Thatcher’s understanding of vision as a tool of leadership A Scout leader’s determination to develop a strong year-round outdoor program, or to conduct an effective membership drive, or to involve more parents in leadership positions On Day One, we talked about both vision and mission. How would you accomplish the vision? With a plan. A plan is made up of the steps that lead to the realization of a vision. A plan with goals is the nuts-and-bolts part of leading change. It is the blueprint for making the changes that will fulfill the vision. Effective leaders have the capacity to create a compelling vision, but they must also be able to translate that vision into reality. A clearly defined plan allows them to make that happen. When we discussed vision and mission on Day One, we did so in the context of values. ‘What are values?

10. How to Lead Change Step #4: — Establish Urgency Reason - to change Urgency – for change Step #4. Establish Urgency People need a compelling reason to change. Without urgency, great ideas may sit on the shelf for years. The television was invented in the late 1930s but did not become a widespread technology until the 1950s. Bar codes were devised in the 1950s but languished as a marketing idea until the 1980s. The advent of aircraft carriers during World War II made the battleship all but obsolete, yet it would be half a century before the world’s navies fully adjusted to that fact. To create urgency for change, we must communicate to others the vision of what change can do, and the steps to make that change possible, necessary, and desirable. Key techniques in communicating urgency for change are - Simplicity - Leadership by example - Metaphor, analogy, and example - Explanation of seeming inconsistencies - Multiple forums - Give and take - RepetitionStep #4. Establish Urgency People need a compelling reason to change. Without urgency, great ideas may sit on the shelf for years. The television was invented in the late 1930s but did not become a widespread technology until the 1950s. Bar codes were devised in the 1950s but languished as a marketing idea until the 1980s. The advent of aircraft carriers during World War II made the battleship all but obsolete, yet it would be half a century before the world’s navies fully adjusted to that fact. To create urgency for change, we must communicate to others the vision of what change can do, and the steps to make that change possible, necessary, and desirable. Key techniques in communicating urgency for change are - Simplicity - Leadership by example - Metaphor, analogy, and example - Explanation of seeming inconsistencies - Multiple forums - Give and take - Repetition

11. How to Lead Change Step #5: — Move ahead Regardless Move Ahead Embrace change 5. Move Ahead Regardless Move Ahead Some people are so resistant to change, you may not be able to bring them along on the journey to effective change. They my not be able to accept changes that are necessary and/or inevitable. They may find it impossible to embrace change and enjoy what it has to offer. Encourage them anyway. As change occurs, they may become enthused about what they see happening and will decide to come on board. They may decide they don’t want to be left behind and so may come along reluctantly. If they simply cannot or will not change, they will eventually remove themselves from a dynamic situation or will discover that the situation has moved on without them. Those things happen. It is one of the ways that groups reshape themselves to take advantage of inevitable change.5. Move Ahead Regardless Move Ahead Some people are so resistant to change, you may not be able to bring them along on the journey to effective change. They my not be able to accept changes that are necessary and/or inevitable. They may find it impossible to embrace change and enjoy what it has to offer. Encourage them anyway. As change occurs, they may become enthused about what they see happening and will decide to come on board. They may decide they don’t want to be left behind and so may come along reluctantly. If they simply cannot or will not change, they will eventually remove themselves from a dynamic situation or will discover that the situation has moved on without them. Those things happen. It is one of the ways that groups reshape themselves to take advantage of inevitable change.

12. How to Lead Change Step #6: — Create a culture that embraces change. Seek willing, effective change Challenging to lead change in larger groups Step #6: Create a culture that embraces change. Perhaps you have had a positive experience leading change with a group of people. The next time it is necessary to lead change with this group, will you need to begin back at Step 1? Perhaps, though a group that has gone through a process of change will have learned a great deal about themselves and about ways that they can maximize their resources and abilities to create positive changes. An important goal of leading change is to create a culture that embraces the need for change and that seeks it out willingly, effectively, and with a sense of eagerness and anticipation. That can happen within a small team of people, a Scouting unit, a business, or an entire organization. Leading change on a large scale involves the same approach as when working with just a few people. The greatest challenge in leading to create change within a culture is that progress may seem much slower and incremental than when working with small groups or when attempting to reach more modest goals. Step #6: Create a culture that embraces change. Perhaps you have had a positive experience leading change with a group of people. The next time it is necessary to lead change with this group, will you need to begin back at Step 1? Perhaps, though a group that has gone through a process of change will have learned a great deal about themselves and about ways that they can maximize their resources and abilities to create positive changes. An important goal of leading change is to create a culture that embraces the need for change and that seeks it out willingly, effectively, and with a sense of eagerness and anticipation. That can happen within a small team of people, a Scouting unit, a business, or an entire organization. Leading change on a large scale involves the same approach as when working with just a few people. The greatest challenge in leading to create change within a culture is that progress may seem much slower and incremental than when working with small groups or when attempting to reach more modest goals.

13. How to Lead Change Step 1 – Change Happens Step 2 – Empower Others Step 3 – Vision, Mission, and Values Step 4 – Urgency Step 5 – Move Ahead Step 6 – Embrace Change Step 1 — Recognize that change happens. Step 2 — Empower others to help you lead change. Step 3 — Lead change based on vision, mission, and values. Step 4 — Establish urgency. Step 5 — Move ahead, regardless. Step 6 — Create a culture that embraces change.Step 1 — Recognize that change happens. Step 2 — Empower others to help you lead change. Step 3 — Lead change based on vision, mission, and values. Step 4 — Establish urgency. Step 5 — Move ahead, regardless. Step 6 — Create a culture that embraces change.

14. CHARACTERISTICS OF A GOOD GOAL Visible: People see Unambiguous: No doubt Related: To change Three Characteristics of a Good Incremental Goal: It is visible *(people see for themselves it’s not just hype) It’s unambiguous *(a real win – no doubt) It’s Related *It’s clearly related to the change effortThree Characteristics of a Good Incremental Goal: It is visible *(people see for themselves it’s not just hype) It’s unambiguous *(a real win – no doubt) It’s Related *It’s clearly related to the change effort

15. 2000 Olympics Sydney, Australia Cathy Freeman Small Steps Can Lead Change Toward Remarkable Goals In the 2000 Olympics in Sydney, Australia, an Aborigine woman named Cathy-Freeman ran in the 400 meter race. It was remarkable that she was even entered in the event. Cathy Freeman’s Aboriginal ancestors had lived in Australia for thousands of years before European settlers arrived and forced many of them off their lands. The history of relations between Aborigines and the rest of the Australians was darkened by distrust and despair. Discrimination against the Aboriginal people became embedded in Australian culture. As recently as two generations before the Olympics, Aborigine children still could be taken from their families to be raised outside their native traditions. As recently as 30 years before the Olympics, Aborigines still could not vote. Then Cathy Freeman won the Olympic gold medal. She crossed the finish line to the cheers of 110,000 fellow countrymen in the stadium and millions more throughout Australia — people cheering not only for the runner’s personal achievement, but also in recognition of the enormous cultural change occurring in their nation. On her victory lap, Cathy Freeman carried two flags — that of Australia and that of the Aborigine people — knotted together to form one. It was a crystalline moment for Australians, a recognition that their culture would, from that moment on, be forever changed for the better. But it was a change a long time in coming, a gradual change that had involved the efforts of great numbers of people over a great many years. Just as Cathy Freeman’s victory in the Olympic race was won a single step at a time, the cultural change that is occurring in Australia is a victory won out of many, many small, incremental steps. The vision of a fairer, freer nation is being slowly realized as Australians make it their mission to accept change within their culture and to embrace the better world that lies beyond. Small Steps Can Lead Change Toward Remarkable Goals In the 2000 Olympics in Sydney, Australia, an Aborigine woman named Cathy-Freeman ran in the 400 meter race. It was remarkable that she was even entered in the event. Cathy Freeman’s Aboriginal ancestors had lived in Australia for thousands of years before European settlers arrived and forced many of them off their lands. The history of relations between Aborigines and the rest of the Australians was darkened by distrust and despair. Discrimination against the Aboriginal people became embedded in Australian culture. As recently as two generations before the Olympics, Aborigine children still could be taken from their families to be raised outside their native traditions. As recently as 30 years before the Olympics, Aborigines still could not vote. Then Cathy Freeman won the Olympic gold medal. She crossed the finish line to the cheers of 110,000 fellow countrymen in the stadium and millions more throughout Australia — people cheering not only for the runner’s personal achievement, but also in recognition of the enormous cultural change occurring in their nation. On her victory lap, Cathy Freeman carried two flags — that of Australia and that of the Aborigine people — knotted together to form one. It was a crystalline moment for Australians, a recognition that their culture would, from that moment on, be forever changed for the better. But it was a change a long time in coming, a gradual change that had involved the efforts of great numbers of people over a great many years. Just as Cathy Freeman’s victory in the Olympic race was won a single step at a time, the cultural change that is occurring in Australia is a victory won out of many, many small, incremental steps. The vision of a fairer, freer nation is being slowly realized as Australians make it their mission to accept change within their culture and to embrace the better world that lies beyond.

16. “We cannot become what we need to be by remaining what we are.” Max De Pree (American writer) “We cannot become what we need to be by remaining what we are.” Max De Pree “We cannot become what we need to be by remaining what we are.” Max De Pree

17. Lead Change Through Lifelong Learning The Ultimate Step The Ultimate Step — Lead Change Through Lifelong Learning If the world around us were constant, we wouldn’t need to change. Everything would stay the same, and so could we. It would be easy, though in the absence of change we would be bored right out of our minds. Of course, we live in a world swirling with change, change that seems to be occurring at an ever-increasing rate. We can be fearful of it or we can embrace it, move with it, and enjoy what it has to offer. To take full advantage of change, each of us needs to be a lifelong learner. The leadership needs of the future will be different from what they are now. Leaders will need to adapt to succeed. They will need to embrace change. The way to embrace change at a personal level is through lifelong learning.The Ultimate Step — Lead Change Through Lifelong Learning If the world around us were constant, we wouldn’t need to change. Everything would stay the same, and so could we. It would be easy, though in the absence of change we would be bored right out of our minds. Of course, we live in a world swirling with change, change that seems to be occurring at an ever-increasing rate. We can be fearful of it or we can embrace it, move with it, and enjoy what it has to offer. To take full advantage of change, each of us needs to be a lifelong learner. The leadership needs of the future will be different from what they are now. Leaders will need to adapt to succeed. They will need to embrace change. The way to embrace change at a personal level is through lifelong learning.

18. Habits of Lifelong Learning Risk taking Humble self-reflection Solicitation of opinions Careful listening Openness Mental Habits That Support Lifelong Learning Risk taking Humble self-reflection Solicitation of opinions Careful listening Openness to new ideas Mental Habits That Support Lifelong Learning Risk taking Humble self-reflection Solicitation of opinions Careful listening Openness to new ideas

19. Leaders are Educators Leaders are educators They don’t Just educate others, though. They are also responsible for seeing to their own continuing education. Leaders are educators They don’t Just educate others, though. They are also responsible for seeing to their own continuing education.

20. If we have a clear vision of what can be, then leading change can help make it so. If we have a clear vision of what can be. Then leading change can help make it so If we have a clear vision of what can be. Then leading change can help make it so

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