Oakland Unified School District
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 56

Oakland Unified School District PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 143 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Oakland Unified School District The Most Improved Large Urban District in California Over the Past Six Years 118 Point API Gain since 2006. Oakland USD Data (2009). Students District enrollment (includes 1,827 Pre-K)41,082 Adult Education Programs25,138 Number of Schools104

Download Presentation

Oakland Unified School District

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Oakland unified school district

Oakland Unified School District

The Most Improved Large Urban District in California Over the Past Six Years

118 Point API Gain

since 2006


Oakland usd data 2009

Oakland USD Data (2009)

  • Students

    • District enrollment (includes 1,827 Pre-K)41,082

    • Adult Education Programs25,138

    • Number of Schools104

    • English Learners23.1%

    • Free or reduced lunch70.18%

    • Attendance rate94.5%

  • Student Ethnic and Racial Distribution

    • African American35.3%

    • Hispanic or Latino34.7%

    • Asian14.6%

    • White (not Hispanic)7.0%

    • Multiple or No Response6.2%

    • Pacific Islander1.1%

    • Filipino0.8%

    • American Indian or Alaska Native0.4%

  • Oakland Charter Schools (1993-2010)

    • 42 Petitions approved, 32 Operating, 5 Revoked, 3 Surrendered

    • District authorized charter school enrollment7,621


Oakland unified school district

VISION:All students will graduate as caring, competent and critical thinkers, fully informed, engaged and contributing citizens, prepared to succeed in college and career.

— GOALS —

Students take responsibility forthemselves and the common good.

Students will possess personalmotivation, skills and resiliencynecessary for success in life and the workplace.

All students will meet or exceed rigorous standards

in all academic disciplines. All students will:

Graduateprepared to succeed in college and the workplace.

Succeed in Algebraby the end of ninth grade.

Read and writeby the end of third grade.

— BOARD PRIORITIES —

Effective Instruction for Every Student, Every Classroom, Every Day

Safe and Supportive Schools

Literacy for College and Career Readiness

ACHIEVEMENT • EQUITY • ACCOUNTABILITY

Core Values Underlying Our Work


District goals and strategic priorities

District Goals and Strategic Priorities

12th Grade: Ready for College and Career

9th Grade: Proficient in Algebra

3rd Grade: Proficient in Reading and Writing

Effective Instruction Every Day

Safe and Supportive Schools

Success in

College and Career


The results so far

The Results So Far…

Five Year Data:

  • 118 point district API growth past five years, highest by far of any large urban in CA

  • 14 point increase in graduation rate, narrowed gap w African American and Latino students

  • 30+ point gain in CST in Elementary math and ELA proficiency

  • Significant gains by schools and central office depts. on satisfaction surveys

    New Data:

  • All subgroups growing, Latinos narrowing achievement gap

  • District math CST grade 4 at 65%, grade 5 at 61% proficient/adv., beating the state average

  • Strong growth in 9th grade, extending grade spans with growth

  • Almost 50% of schools with 25+ pt. API gain


Oakland unified school district

District API: OUSD Moves Ahead in 2010


Oakland unified school district

OUSD Demonstrates Largest 6 Year API Gains

118 API points


Oakland unified school district

7


Oakland unified school district

Quality

Options

Empowered

School

Leaders

Personalized

Learning

Expect

Success

Performance

Management

Standards

Based

Instruction

Technology

Paper to computer Manual to automated Sustainable systems Smart use of data

Expect Success Reform: 2003-10

Dollars follow students More equitable funding More flexibility in spending

Families make choices District manages school portfolio

Small class sizes & schools Small learning communities Small principal networks

Investment in people

Service Standards

Transparent scorecards

Public results

Standards-Based Pacing & Assessments

Collaborative Teacher Inquiry (PLC)

Targeting Curriculum & PD


Oakland unified school district

Quality

Options

Empowered

School

Leaders

Personalized

Learning

Expect

Success

Performance

Management

Standards

Based

Instruction

Technology

Paper to computer Manual to automated Sustainable systems Smart use of data

Expect Success Reform: 2003-10

Dollars follow students More equitable funding More flexibility in spending

Families make choices District manages school portfolio

Small class sizes & schools Small learning communities Small principal networks

Investment in people

Service Standards

Transparent scorecards

Public results

Standards-Based Pacing & Assessments

Collaborative Teacher Inquiry (PLC)

Targeting Curriculum & PD


Oakland unified school district

Vision, Values, Goals

Strategy & Strategic Projects

Created a Culture of Accountability and Support at Each Level

Board of Education

Coherent Governance

Cabinet

Strategic Planning Cycle

Schools & Central Office

School Goals/Scorecards

Service Area Goals/Scorecards

  • Homerun Projects

  • Contracting

  • Safety

  • Pay Concerns

  • On-boarding

  • Substitute Fill Rate

  • Clean Schools

SPSA, RBI & Team Awards

SIPs, CPI & Team Awards

Employee Evaluations, Individual Learning Plans & Individual Awards

Individuals

Individual Goals


Oakland unified school district

Performance Accountability: Created a Data-Driven, Results-Oriented Culture

Customer Service Culture

Leadership

Professional

Development

Rewards &Consequences

Data

Collection

& Reporting

Evaluation

Inquiry &

Accountability

Cycle


Oakland unified school district

Results-Based Cycles of Inquiry

Schools have the flexibility to partner with a professional development provider or data coach of their choice. Principals provide evidence of their inquiry work to Network Executive Officers.

  • Central Office Supports Results-Based Inquiry in the following ways:

  • Every administrator, teacher and coach has online access to real time student level data. Additional reports are released regularly.

  • Standards-based common assessments are administered four times per year in Math and English Language Arts, and teachers have access to a robust item bank to create their own assessments.

  • Principals receive data training and support from their Network Executive Officer, central office coaches, and peers at network meetings two times per month.


Central office accountability

Central Office Accountability


Annual scorecards ensure public accountability

Annual Scorecards Ensure Public Accountability

  • Every school posts a scorecard outside of the main office. Scorecards include information regarding:

  • Enrollment,

  • Summary performance data

  • Student achievement and school climate and culture data,

  • Qualitative description of the school.


Oakland unified school district

Quality

Options

Empowered

School

Leaders

Personalized

Learning

Expect

Success

Performance

Accountability

Standards

Based

Instruction

Technology

Paper to computer Manual to automated Sustainable systems Smart use of data

Expect Success Reform: 2003-10

Dollars follow students More equitable funding More flexibility in spending

Families make choices District manages school portfolio

Small class sizes & schools Small learning communities Small principal networks

Investment in people

Service Standards

Transparent scorecards

Public results

Standards-Based Pacing & Assessments

Collaborative Teacher Inquiry (PLC)

Targeting Curriculum & PD


Oakland unified school district

School Portfolio Management Framework

School Portfolio Management: Managing the Success and Quality of SchoolsThe District will provide a diverse portfolio of high quality schools for students and families both within neighborhoods and district-wide

Quality

OUSD is continually managing its dynamic portfolio of schools across these three dimensions

Enrollment / Capacity

Programmatic Diversity

High quality and diverse educational options

SUPPLY

DEMAND


Oakland unified school district

Tiered School Accountability and Support

In order to accelerate achievement in every school, OUSD differentiates the supports and interventions provided based on where schools currently exist along the continuum from needing intervention to having demonstrated a capacity to accelerate achievement. This differentiation also allows for innovation while increasing accountability across the system

Tiering Criteria:

i) Absolute Performanceii) Accelerated Student Level Growth iii) Closing the Achievement Gap

BLUE Tier

GREEN Tier

YELLOW Tier

ORANGE Tier

RED Tier

Increased Monitoring and Support

Increased Curricular Flexibilities awarded through application process

Accountability for Results


Oakland unified school district

Quality

Options

Empowered

School

Leaders

Personalized

Learning

Expect

Success

Performance

Accountability

Standards

Based

Instruction

Technology

Paper to computer Manual to automated Sustainable systems Smart use of data

Expect Success Reform: 2003-10

Dollars follow students More equitable funding More flexibility in spending

Families make choices District manages school portfolio

Small class sizes & schools Small learning communities Small principal networks

Investment in people

Service Standards

Transparent scorecards

Public results

Standards-Based Pacing & Assessments

Collaborative Teacher Inquiry (PLC)

Targeting Curriculum & PD


Common vision and aligned system requires effective practice defined at each level

Common Vision and Aligned System Requires Effective Practice Defined at Each Level

Achievement

Equity

Accountability

Effective Learner

Effective Instruction

Effective Leadership

Effective Schools

Effective District Office

Vision

& Core

Values

22


To implement the district priorities we must have effective leadership

To Implement the District Priorities, we must have Effective Leadership

Our Theory of Action for Principal Leadership is…

If we recruit, develop, support, and retain strong, learning-focused principals at each school, hold them accountable for achieving ambitious goals, and allow guided budget authority and opportunities for curricular flexibility to meet the goals, those principals will develop highly effective teachers, empower their communities, and create a vibrant, collaborative culture so that all students achieve at high levels.


Oakland unified school district

Regional

Team

Network

Officers

OUSD Network Model

Effective

Instruction

Every Day

School

Leadership Team

Recruits, develops,

supports, challenges,

holds accountable

High

Levels of

Student

Learning

Safe and

Supportive

Schools

Strong Learning-

Focused Principals

Aligns Support

Supports

Recruits, develops, supports, challenges,

holds accountable

Central Service

Departments

Literacy for

College and

Career Success

Supt. &

Cabinet

  • Defines goals and targets

  • Defines district-wide strategies

  • Brokers relationships (internal and external)

  • Supports, challenges, inspires, holds accountable

Board


Developing and supporting principal leadership

Developing and Supporting Principal Leadership

  • Pipeline partnerships to find and select the best possible site administrators

  • Coaching for new administrators

  • Network Officers intensively support and supervise principals, monitor school progress toward goals

  • Small networks and inquiry groups allow principals to share effective practices and create a learning focused culture

  • Results-Based Budgeting gives principals real cost control over resources

  • School Quality Practices set the standard and path for school improvement


Effective school practices supports

Effective School Practices & Supports

  • Effective School Practices

  • School-wide focus on effective instruction and assessing student learning

  • Grade level standards based curriculum, aligned assessments, and effective instructional strategies for all students

  • Data-based collaborative inquiry on individual student progress

  • Aligned resources and structures to support effective and student learning

  • Safe, positive school climate and culture

  • Partnerships with parents and the community

Supports & Resources

  • Curriculum & Pacing Guides

  • Assessments

  • Tools and Coaching for Collaborative Inquiry

  • Professional Development in Core Curriculum, Interventions and Instructional Strategies (Swun Math; OCR; Writing; ELD)

  • Principal Learning and Leadership Coaching

  • Operations Support

  • Extended Learning

  • Linked Learning & “a-g”


Oakland unified school district

Quality

Options

Empowered

School

Leaders

Personalized

Learning

Expect

Success

Performance

Accountability

Standards

Based

Instruction

Technology

Paper to computer Manual to automated Sustainable systems Smart use of data

Expect Success Reform: 2003-10

Dollars follow students More equitable funding More flexibility in spending

Families make choices District manages school portfolio

Small class sizes & schools Small learning communities Small principal networks

Investment in people

Service Standards

Transparent scorecards

Public results

Standards-Based Pacing & Assessments

Collaborative Teacher Inquiry (PLC)

Targeting Curriculum & PD


Oakland unified school district

#2 Cox1240 Students

#1 Webster990 Students

#3 Fruitvale730 Students

#2 Bella Vista750 Students

#2 Allendale590 Students

#3 Franklin860 Students

#3 Manzanita921 Students

#1 Highland830 Students

#1 Whittier682 Students

#2 Horace Mann540 Students

#1 Hawthorne1447 Students

#2 Stonehurst800 Students

#8 Lincoln640 Students

#2Lockwood876 Students

#1 Woodland265 Students

Hills:

#7 Kaiser274 Students

#10 Thornhill350 Students

#7 Grass Valley240 Students

#7 Munck315 Students

#10 Hillcrest260 Students

#10 Joaquin Miller356 Students

#10 Redwood Heights280 Students

#9 Chabot370 Students

#10 Montclair350 Students

School Size Matters: Is This Fair?

Color Key:# API Ranking: 10 is the highestEnrollment

Flatlands:

Lake Merritt

#1Jefferson1009 Students

#2 Garfield950 Students

#2Melrose490 Students


New small schools theory of action

New Small Schools Theory of Action

  • Effective leaders guide effective teams of leaders who have control over the variables for success in an accountable system will create success.

  • Schools that are filled with at-risk student populations need to be small so they can develop strong adult relationships, personalized learning, and safety nets.

  • Teachers working with such populations need strong intimate learning communities to be effective


Oakland unified school district

OUSD New Small School Incubation

  • New schools emerge from an identified community need

  • Incubator converts small declining enrollment, failing schools into new up-and-coming school that attract enrollment, through community-based design team process.

  • Incubator converts large, over-utilized failing school into new optimally sized up-and-coming school, through community-based design team process.

Process

New optimally-sized up-

and-coming school

INCUBATOR

Design Team

Small, underutilized, declining enrollment, failing schools

New optimally-sized up-

and-coming school

New optimally-sized up-

and-coming school

INCUBATOR

Design Team

New optimally-sized up-

and-coming school

Large, over-utilized failing school


Who is on the design team

Who is on the Design Team?

Example: Design Team

Design Team

Team of 10 Parents, Community Members, Students, and Educators

Design Community

Large group of parents, community members, students, and educators

School Community

School staff, administration, students, and families. Community organizations and neighborhoods. Oakland Unified School District and New School Development Group

  • Liz O., Design Team leader

  • Marley C., parent

  • Elisa E., parent

  • Myesha L., parent

  • Jesus R., community partner (OCO)

  • Gilbert Z., community partner (Evenstart)

  • Eduardo E., teacher

  • Tim H., teacher

  • Linda T., teacher


Oakland unified school district

49 New Small Schools in Oakland: 2000 - 2008

Fall 2004

Fall 2003

Fall 2000

Fall 2005

Fall 2006

Fall 2001

Fall 2007

Fall 2008

Fall 2002

*MetWest

*KIPP

Bridges Academy

Coliseum

College Prep

Maxwell Park Int’l Academy

West Oakland MS

Encompass Academy

New

Highland

ACORN

Woodland

*School of

Social Justice

& Community Development

Sankofa Academy

Roots Int’l

**Explore

Leadership

Prep

Learning Without Limits

Alliance Academy

Futures

Elementary

Think College Now

*BEST HS

EXCEL HS

ASCEND

Elmhurst

Community

Prep

East Oakland School of

the Arts

*East Oakland Community HS

*Community United Elementary

Esperanza Elementary

Global Family School

Media College Prep

Urban

Promise

Int’l

Community

School

Reach Academy

YES

Manzanita

SEED

*Peralta Creek

United for Success Academy

*Kizmet Academy

CBITS

Mandela

HS

Melrose Leadership Academy

RISE

East Oakland PRIDE

College Prep & Architecture

Greenleaf

Elementary

Life Academy

PLACE

@

Prescott

*Robeson School of Visual & Performing Arts

*Closed (7)

*Opened befpre incubation (2)

*National model, no OUSD incubation (3)

Manzanita

Community

School

Fred T.

Korematsu

Discovery

Academy

*International

HS

Graphic: Courtesy of Jean Wing, OUSD New School Development Group

- 32 -


Oakland unified school district

OUSD INCUBATION PROCESS: 2004-09

New School Incubator Curriculum – 1st Semester

Graphic: Courtesy of OUSD New School Development Group


Oakland unified school district

Community Analysis

Theory of Action

Vision

OUSD INCUBATION PROCESS: 2004-09

New School Incubator Curriculum – 2nd Semester

May - Jun

Graphic: Courtesy of OUSD New School Development Group

Mar - Apr

Jan - Feb

Instructional Program

Instructional Program

SCHOOL DESIGN PROPOSAL = THE FOUNDATION


Conditions that have promoted new school success in ousd

Conditions That Have Promoted New School Success in OUSD

Leader

  • Desires to start a new school and willing to embrace the challenge

  • Has successful experience as an administrator, and as a leader in OUSD

  • Has experience in the specific school community in which s/he is started a school

    Community

  • Wants a new school

  • Participates in the leadership selection and on the design team

    Staff

  • Selected because their vision aligns with the school vision

  • Chooses to be part of the new school

  • Participates in the design (majority)


Conditions that have promoted new school success in ousd1

Conditions That Have Promoted New School Success in OUSD

Planning & Design (Incubation)

  • Happens before school opens

  • Led by the person who becomes the principal

  • Comprehensive one-year process

  • Coaching provided to design team

  • Clear theory of action and aligned program

    Opening

  • Identified permanent facilities

  • Received coaching in year 1 to support implementation of design

  • Received operations support in year 1 to allow leadership to move past operations to instruction and culture

  • Limited starting grade span, expanding annually


Stanford study of ousd new small schools initiative

Stanford Study of OUSD New Small Schools Initiative

Research Goals:

To understand how well new small schools and existing schools in OUSD are performing over time, taking into account the students they serve and their process of start-up & development

To understand what factors influence schools’ achievement and their improvement trajectories over time

To recommend policy strategies that can build on current successes and address identified needs and issues


Key measure in the study school level productivity

Key Measure in the Study – School Level “Productivity”

Productivity is a school’s capacity to add value to students’ learning beyond students’ prior achievement and background characteristics.

Productivity is evaluated by looking at how a school’s students achieve on the CST tests in comparison to those in schools serving similar students. A productive school produces achievement that is significantly higher than this benchmark.


Student level factors explain about 2 3 of variance in cst scores

Student Level Factors Explain about 2/3 of Variance in CST Scores

School and Other Factors

30.4%

*CST Math model explained 66% of variance, leaving 34% to be explained by school and other factors


School design features influence productivity

School Design Features Influence Productivity

School Level CST Scores

(Standard Scores)


Api and three year average productivity elementary ela

API and Three-Year Average Productivity: Elementary ELA

Mean “Old” Schools = -.012

Mean New Schools = .019

Acorn Woodland

API 2008

Three-Year Average Productivity


Learnings from new small school work

Learnings from New Small School Work

  • Move out resistant staff from the outset. Staff forced to participate perpetuate toxic culture

  • Design team needs dedicated time and support to be successful.

  • Design teams need a strong theory of action to ground their plans, otherwise it becomes hard to know what to prioritize

  • New schools need a lot of help implementing their plans. Year 1 is often focused on just figuring out operations and culture

  • New schools must develop a purposeful culture grounded in the theory of action and where everyone shares responsibility for implementation. Coherence is a lot of work.


Key district policy supports for schools

Key District Policy Supports for Schools

Provide support and flexibility

Network Executive Officers serve as thought-partners rather than compliance officers to school leaders

Embrace entrepreneurial ethos of small school principals; support innovation

Coaches support standards-based instruction and collaborative inquiry

Incubate new schools and leaders

Continue to strengthen BTSA model by investing in coaches and their training

Develop incentives for developing / keeping strong teachers and attracting them to high-priority schools

Examine leadership, working conditions, hiring, and mentoring in high-turnover schools

Strengthen coaching support for all new teachers

Provide service and support orientation, especially in HR

Streamline hiring process

Continue to move up hiring window to recruit top-quality candidates

Prioritize hiring experienced, qualified teachers wherever possible

Evaluate teacher pipelines in terms of retention and effectiveness and further develop strong pipelines, including “grow your own” models

Identify and recruit strong student teachers


Oakland unified school district

Quality

Options

Empowered

School

Leaders

Personalized

Learning

Expect

Success

Performance

Accountability

Standards

Based

Instruction

Technology

Paper to computer Manual to automated Sustainable systems Smart use of data

Expect Success Reform: 2003-10

Dollars follow students More equitable funding More flexibility in spending

Families make choices District manages school portfolio

Small class sizes & schools Small learning communities Small principal networks

Investment in people

Service Standards

Transparent scorecards

Public results

Standards-Based Pacing & Assessments

Collaborative Teacher Inquiry (PLC)

Targeting Curriculum & PD


Swun math

Swun Math

Program Overview

A highly-effective and coherent math model with alignment in standards, curriculum, assessments, professional development and accountability measures.


Swun math partnership with ousd

Swun Math Partnership with OUSD

  • Thoughtful and careful phased expansion

  • Consistent, differentiated and ongoing PD for teachers and principals

  • Site support and coaching for teachers and principals to connect and build on the PD provided (lesson modeling, co-teaching/elbow teaching, observations & feedback, debrief)

  • Training and certification process of district math coaches to ensure high quality services provided

  • District Math Pacing Guides (K-7) aligned with CST & district textbooks

  • Instructional strategies (manuals and PowerPoint)

  • Supplemental lessons for standards weakly addressed in textbook

  • Progress monitoring check-ins with district administrators and principals

  • Practice trimester exams that help teachers backwards plan and calibrate their understanding of the expected rigor

  • Reliable common summative district math assessments (K-7)

  • Formative unit assessments aligned with pacing guides

  • District-wide Beyond the Basic Facts Math Competitions (Grades 3, 5, and 6)

  • Beyond the Basic Facts Parent Workshops (ES & MS)

  • Summer school/intervention pacing guides, pre-/post-assessments

  • Math teacher leader training to build site capacity


Oakland unified school district

Oakland Unified School DistrictCST Math 2007-2010 (by school)

Percent of School Proficient and Advanced in Math

Before Swun Math Implementation

After Swun Math Implementation 2007-2010


Oakland unified school district

Oakland Unified School DistrictCST Math 2008-2010 (by school)

Percent of School Proficient and Advanced in Math

Before Swun Math Implementation

After Swun Math Implementation 2008-2010


Oakland unified school district

Oakland Unified School DistrictCST Math 2009-2010 (by school)

Percent of School Proficient and Advanced in Math

Before Swun Math Implementation

After Swun Math Implementation 2009-2010


Oakland unified school district

Oakland Unified School DistrictCST Math 2009-2010 (by school)

Percent of School Proficient and Advanced in Math

Before Swun Math Implementation

After Swun Math Implementation 2008-2010


Oakland unified school district

Oakland Unified School DistrictCST Math 2009-2010 (middle School)

Percent of School Proficient and Advanced in Math

Before Swun Math Implementation

After Swun Math Implementation 2009-2010


Summary of year 4 2009 2010

Summary of Year 4: 2009-2010

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL EXPANSION

  • 15 schools added for a total of 35 out of 61 elementary schools

  • Coincided with first year implementation of newly adopted math texts

  • ALL PD made available to Swun Math and non-Swun Math schools

    MIDDLE SCHOOL EXPANSION

  • Grade 6 expanded from 3 MS to all 18 middle schools

  • Grade 7 piloted at 17 out of 18 MS

  • Implementation challenges: first year of newly adopted math texts, competing middle school initiatives & priorities, and significant number of new teachers

    CST RESULTS

  • Grade 7 increased 8%

  • Average 8-10% growth in elementary schools, many higher


Oakland unified school district

Our Opportunity for Change

K - 12 Education is on the brink of the best of times…we can enter an era of unprecedented effectiveness for the practice of education--one in which the vast majority of schools can be highly effective in promoting student learning. - Robert Marzano (2003)


Oakland unified school district

Thanks for listening!

Questions?

Brad Stam’s contact information:

[email protected]

415-676-1523


Oakland unified school district

APPENDIX


New small schools timeline 1997 2009

New Small Schools Timeline: 1997-2009


  • Login