John o jordan s the purloined handkerchief
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John O. Jordan’s “The Purloined Handkerchief”. Analysis By: Joshua Kirtley, Stephanie Krumm, Jennie McCully, Tova Salley. Overview. “The Purloined Letter” Handkerchief’s origin Handkerchief’s importance to social classes Nancy Oliver Economy Application to “The Purloined Letter”

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John O. Jordan’s “The Purloined Handkerchief”

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John o jordan s the purloined handkerchief

John O. Jordan’s“The Purloined Handkerchief”

Analysis By:

Joshua Kirtley, Stephanie Krumm,

Jennie McCully, Tova Salley


Overview

Overview

  • “The Purloined Letter”

  • Handkerchief’s origin

  • Handkerchief’s importance to social classes

  • Nancy

  • Oliver

  • Economy

  • Application to “The Purloined Letter”

  • Work Cited


The purloined letter

“The Purloined Letter”

  • Purloined= verb: “to purloin” Anglo-French: “pur-loigner”

  • Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Purloined Letter”

  • Handkerchief displacement from origin


Handkerchiefs and social classes

Handkerchiefs and Social Classes

  • Handkerchiefs became part of the Victorian dress code.

    - Upper class=Silk, carried in the pocket. Gentlemen wore “neck cloths” and “cravats.”

    - Lower class=Cotton, often worn around the neck. Working class wore neckerchiefs.


Handkerchiefs and social classes1

…Handkerchiefs and Social Classes

  • Dickens attempted to form some kind of philosophy of clothing in Oliver Twist.

  • “Power of Dress”

    - Clothes signify social distinctions.

    - Power is represented by clothing.

    - Clothes help maintain social control.


Nancy

Nancy

  • Nancy receives a handkerchief from Rose.

    - The handkerchief exchange signifies the relationship between Nancy and Rose.

  • The white handkerchief symbolizes purity.

  • The handkerchief’s is significant in Nancy’s death.

    - It links Rose, Nancy, and Agnes together.


Nancy1

…Nancy

  • Sikes strikes through the handkerchief.

    - He tries to hide the handkerchief.

    - The handkerchief is present even when he dies.


Oliver

Oliver

  • Oliver is innocent.

    - “Because his heart and mind are innocent, the idea of theft never occurs to him.”

  • He represents a purloined handkerchief.

    - He is circulated throughout the text to be claimed by those around him.

    - He’s sometimes treated like an object.


Oliver1

…Oliver

  • He seems to be a blank space that others try to fill up.

    - Bumble and the Police officer name him.

    - Fagin tries to teach him thievery.

  • He actually has already been marked.

    - His mother imprints a kiss on him when he is born.


Conclusion

Conclusion

  • Handkerchiefs serve an economic purpose.

    - Handkerchief production increases.

  • Application to “The Purloined Letter”

    - A letter always reaches its destination.

    - The handkerchief does not reach its destination.


Work cited

Work Cited

Jordan, John O. “The Purloined Handkerchief.” Oliver Twist. By Charles Dickens. Ed. Fred Kaplan. New York: Norton, 1993. 580-593.


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