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Using Nonfiction Text in Pre-Kindergarten PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Using Nonfiction Text in Pre-Kindergarten. Presented by Tiffany Bowers Ronnie Flansburg Carrie Metcalfe . Ice Breaker. Use this time to select a magazine and read at your table. . Look at our day. Morning: 8:30-11:30 Read “Let’s Look in a Book” by Nell Duke

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Using Nonfiction Text in Pre-Kindergarten

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Using nonfiction text in pre kindergarten l.jpg

Using Nonfiction Text in Pre-Kindergarten

Presented by

Tiffany Bowers

Ronnie Flansburg

Carrie Metcalfe


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Ice Breaker

  • Use this time to select a magazine and read at your table.


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Look at our day

Morning: 8:30-11:30

Read “Let’s Look in a Book” by Nell Duke

Discuss importance of non-fiction text

View videos

Explore examples of non-fiction

Lunch: 11:30-1:00

Afternoon: 1:00-3:30

Planning and Preparing for Using Non-Fiction Text

Creating Lesson Plans


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Let’s Look in a Book

By: Nell K. Duke


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Presentation Objectives

  • Learn the importance of using nonfiction text in Pre-K classrooms.

  • Learn how to select appropriate nonfiction material.


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Importance of Nonfiction Texts in Pre-K

  • Children need real life information.

  • Children are naturally curious and love learning new things.

  • Children gain background knowledge about a variety of topics.

  • Children learn new vocabulary.


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“The reason that certain text types (like nonfiction) and features of texts (visuals) tend to engage boys has much less to do with the text itself, and much more to do with the connection these features encourage readers to make to the world.” (Wilhelm 2002, p16)


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Transition/Break

15 minute bathroom/phone break

Circle activity

Video


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Examples of Nonfiction* Materials

  • Magazines

  • Books

  • Posters

  • Newspapers

  • Teacher made books

  • eBooks

  • Maps

    *Informational or

    Expository


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Features of Nonfiction Texts

  • Table of Contents

  • Headings

  • Glossary

  • Index

  • Tables

  • Charts

  • Labels

  • Captions

  • ebooks


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eBooks in Your Classroom

  • Video: Tounorris Walker

    • Teacher Assisstant at Lollipop DCD

    • Discussion


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  • ENJOY YOUR LUNCH


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Sound it Out

  • Transition activity:

  • Guess What Word I’m Saying


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Planning and Preparing for Using Nonfiction Text

  • Identify topics from LFOAI lessons

  • Visit your library/online catalog


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Using Nonfiction Text as Read Alouds: Paired Reading

  • Paired Reading is…

    • Text sets that include a non-fiction text and a fiction book on a similar topic to enhance student learning.


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Teaching Children How Nonfiction Works

  • Explain to the children…

    • What you are reading.

    • Why you are reading it.

  • Let’s write!


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Planning and Preparing for Using Nonfiction Texts

  • Text Selection

    • Age appropriate length

    • Clear pictures/photographs

    • Rich vocabulary

    • Relates to theme or students interest

    • Identify a text feature to highlight

    • Group Time- review the books at your table


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Planning and Preparing for Using Nonfiction Texts

  • Read the book ahead of time.

  • Plan how you will incorporate non-fiction into your LFOAI lesson.

  • Plan your questions and think alouds.

  • Plan your talking points and explanations.

  • Plan for any text feature instruction.

  • Plan how you might make connections to the topic throughout the day.


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Lesson Plans with eBooks

Work together to create a lesson plan for an eBook.

Plans will be shared later with all participants.


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“Adult behaviors that support children’s learning during story interactions are to clarify information, demonstrate, to develop story structure, to draw attention to illustrations, to extend student responses, to extend vocabulary, inform, meta-narrate the text and/or pictures, praise, to point out text features, and scaffold strategies of a reader.”

Nell Duke


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“Nonfiction. Why don’t we just call it ‘Life’? And who ever said five- and six-year-olds don’t experience life?”Tomie dePaola


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Contact Information

  • Tiffany Bowers- [email protected]

  • Ronnie Flansburg- [email protected]

  • Carrie Metcalfe- [email protected]


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