Csce 613 fundamentals of vlsi chip design
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CSCE 613: Fundamentals of VLSI Chip Design. Instructor: Jason D. Bakos. Topics for this Lecture. Semiconductor theory in a nutshell MOSFET devices as switches Transistor-level logic Logic gates IC fabrication SCMOS design rules Cell libraries. Elements. Semiconductors.

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CSCE 613: Fundamentals of VLSI Chip Design

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Csce 613 fundamentals of vlsi chip design

CSCE 613: Fundamentals of VLSI Chip Design

Instructor: Jason D. Bakos


Topics for this lecture

Topics for this Lecture

  • Semiconductor theory in a nutshell

  • MOSFET devices as switches

  • Transistor-level logic

  • Logic gates

  • IC fabrication

  • SCMOS design rules

  • Cell libraries


Elements

Elements


Semiconductors

Semiconductors

  • Silicon is a group IV element (4 valence electrons, shells: 2, 8, 18, …)

    • Forms covalent bonds with four neighbor atoms (3D cubic crystal lattice)

    • Si is a poor conductor, but conduction characteristics may be altered

    • Add impurities/dopants (replaces silicon atom in lattice):

      • Makes a better conductor

      • Group V element (phosphorus/arsenic) => 5 valence electrons

        • Leaves an electron free => n-type semiconductor (electrons, negative carriers)

      • Group III element (boron) => 3 valence electrons

        • Borrows an electron from neighbor => p-type semiconductor (holes, positive carriers)

+

-

-

+

+ + +

+ + +

+ + +

+ + +

- - -

- - -

- - -

- - -

P-N junction

forward bias

reverse bias


Mosfets

MOSFETs

  • Diodes not very useful for building logic

  • Metal-oxide-semiconductor structures built onto substrate

    • Diffusion: Inject dopants into substrate

    • Oxidation: Form layer of SiO2 (glass)

    • Deposition and etching: Add aluminum/copper wires

negative voltage (rel. to body) (GND)

positive voltage (Vdd)

NMOS/NFET

PMOS/PFET

- - -

+ + +

- - -

+ + +

current

current

channel

shorter length, faster transistor (dist. for electrons)

body/bulk

GROUND

body/bulk

HIGH

(S/D to body is reverse-biased)


Fets as switches

FETs as Switches

  • NFETs and PFETs can act as switches

CMOS logic

bulk node not shown

CMOS: assuming PU and PN network are perfect switches and switch simultanously, no current flow and no power consumption!

“and structure”

“or structure”


Logic gates

DeMorgan’s Law

Logic Gates

  • CMOS: complimentary in form and function

  • NMOS devices (positive logic) form pull-down network

  • PMOS devices (negative logic) form pull-up network

  • Implication: CMOS transistor-level logic gates implement functions where may the inputs are inverted (inverting gates)

  • Add inverter at inputs/outputs to create non-inverting gate

inv

NOR2

NAND2

NAND3


Compound gates

Compound Gates

  • Combine parallel and series structures to form compound gates

    • Example:

    • Use DeMorgan’s law to determine complement (pull-down network):

C

A

B

D

Y

C

A

B

D


Pass transistors transmission gates

Pass Transistors/Transmission Gates

  • NMOS passes strong 0 (pull-down)

  • PMOS passes strong 1 (pull-up)

Pass transistor:

Transmission gate:


Tristates

Tristates


Multiplexer

Multiplexer

Transmission gate multiplexer

Inverting multiplexer


Multiplexer1

Multiplexer

4-input multiplexer


Latches

Latches

Positive level-sensitive latch


Latches1

Latches

Positive edge-sensitive latch


Ic fabrication

IC Fabrication

  • Inverter cross-section

field oxide


Ic fabrication1

IC Fabrication

  • Inverter cross-section with well and substrate contacts

(ohmic contact)


Ic fabrication2

IC Fabrication

  • Chips are fabricated using set of masks

    • Photolithography

  • Inverter uses 6 layers:

    • n-well, poly, n+ diffusion, p+ diffusion, contact, metal

  • Basic steps

    • oxidize

    • apply photoresist

    • remove photoresist with mask

    • HF acid eats oxide but not photoresist

    • pirana acid eats photoresist

    • ion implantation (diffusion, wells)

    • vapor deposition (poly)

    • plasma etching (metal)


Ic fabrication3

IC Fabrication

Furnace used to oxidize (900-1200 C)

Mask exposes photoresist to light, allowing removal

HF acid etch

piranha acid etch

diffusion (gas) or ion implantation (electric field)

HF acid etch


Ic fabrication4

IC Fabrication

Heavy doped poly is grown with gas in furnace (chemical vapor deposition)

Masked used to pattern poly

Poly is not affected by ion implantation


Ic fabrication5

IC Fabrication

Metal is sputtered (with vapor) and plasma etched from mask


Layout design rules

Layout Design Rules

  • Design rules define ranges for features

    • Examples:

      • min. wire widths to avoid breaks

      • min. spacings to avoid shorts

      • minimum overlaps to ensure complete overlaps

    • Measured in microns

    • Required for resolution/tolerances of masks

  • Fabrication processes defined by minimum channel width

    • Also minimum width of poly traces

    • Defines “how fast” a fabrication process is

  • Lambda-based (scalable CMOS) design rules define scalable rules based on l (which is half of the minimum channel length)

    • classes of MOSIS SCMOS rules: SUBMICRON, DEEP SUBMICRON


Layout design rules1

Layout Design Rules


Layout design rules2

Layout Design Rules

  • Transistor dimensions are in W/L ratio

    • NFETs are usually twice the width

    • PFETs are usually twice the width of NFETs

      • Holes move more slowly than electrons (must be wider to deliver same current)


Layout

Layout

3-input NAND


Design flow

Design Flow

  • Design flow is a sequence of steps for design and verification

  • In this course:

    • Describe behaviors with VHDL/Verilog code

    • Simulate behavioral designs

    • Synthesize behaviors into cell-level netlists

    • Simulate netlists with cell-delay models

    • Place-and-route netlists into a physical design

    • Simulate netlists with cell-delay models and wire-delay models

  • Need to define a cell library:

    • Function

    • Electrical characteristics of each cell

    • Layout


Cell library snap together

Cell Library (Snap Together)

Layout


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