Becoming a canadian citizen chapter 2
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Becoming a Canadian Citizen Chapter 2 . Deck – Social Studies. In many ways, Canada contains the globe within it’s borders. Built by three founding peoples The Aboriginal people’s The French The English Canada has offered citizenship to people from all corners of the world.

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Becoming a Canadian Citizen Chapter 2

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Becoming a canadian citizen chapter 2

Becoming a Canadian CitizenChapter 2

Deck – Social Studies


Introduction to citizenship

  • In many ways, Canada contains the globe within it’s borders.

  • Built by three founding peoples

    • The Aboriginal people’s

    • The French

    • The English

  • Canada has offered citizenship to people from all corners of the world.

  • What does being Canadian mean to you? – Link back to Identity

  • Do you think our differences makes us strong? Why or why not?

Introduction to Citizenship


Criteria for canadian citizenship

  • Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) sets the criteria for citizenship.

  • To apply a person must!

    • Be 18 years of age

    • Be a permanent resident of Canada

    • Have lived in Canada for three of the previous years

    • Be able to communicate in English or French

    • Know about Canada’s history, geography, and political system

    • Know about the rights and responsibilities of citizenship

  • A person CANNOT apply for citizenship if he or she

    • Is considered to be a risk to Canada’s security

    • Is under a deportation order to leave Canada

    • Has been convicted of an indictable (serious) criminal offence in the past three years

    • Is in prison, on parole, or on probation

    • Is being investigated for or has been convicted of war crimes

    • Has had his or her citizenship revoked in the last five years

Criteria for Canadian Citizenship

85% of immigrants to Canada become citizens!


Citizenship test

  • Citizenship applicants must complete a form and pay a fee, which is less for children under 18.

  • Successful applicants then take an oral or written test of their knowledge of Canada.

  • This includes how to vote, etc.

  • Those who pass the test receive a notice to appear to take the Oath….

Citizenship TEST!

http://www.yourlibrary.ca/citizenship/


Oath of citizenship

  • From permanent resident to citizen is a strong desire for most the process immigrants go through is known as naturalization, which takes time and effort.

  • Those who pass the necessary tests and meet the criteria must Take an Oath of Citizenship

Oath of Citizenship


Rights and responsibilities of citizens

  • As we have learned, all people in Canada have rights and responsibilities.

  • New citizens must respect Canada’s laws.

  • Unlike native-born Canadians, new citizens take an oath or affirm their commitment to Canada.

  • For example, they agree to respect the equality rights of others; to work to eliminate discrimination, etc.

  • Citizens have democratic rights – to vote, run for office in Canadian elections, etc.

Rights and Responsibilities of Citizens


Citizenship and honour

  • Is Canadian citizenship a right or a privilege?

    • For immigrants, YES! They have to apply.

  • Citizenship acquired through lies can be revoked (cancelled).

  • The same is true if a person is considered a threat to national security or to the human rights of others.

  • This is called denaturalization.

  • Denaturalized people can be deported back to their home country.

  • Citizenship may be granted as an honour.

Citizenship and Honour


Human rights and canadian citizenship

  • One of the greatest benefits of citizenship is the right to have rights!

  • At the end of WW II Canada became one of the 51 founding countries of the organization known as the United Nations.

  • Today, the UN has 191 member countries.

  • The UN Human Rights Division wrote the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Human Rights and Canadian Citizenship


Assignment

  • Using your notes and the textbook (chapter 2) answer the following questions on a separate sheet of paper:

  • 1. Describe the difference between naturalization and denaturalization.

  • 2. What is an example of denaturalization?

  • 3. What reasons would you give to new immigrants to become citizens?

  • 4. Create a two-column chart. In the left column list criteria for Canadian citizenship, in the right column note why you agree or disagree with each criterion.

  • 5. Create a diagram showing the steps to becoming a Canadian citizen.

  • 6. List some of the restrictions that non-citizens experience in Canada. Do you think these restrictions are too strict? Not strict enough? What restrictions would you add/remove?

Assignment


Activating questions do you remember

  • Who are the three founding peoples?

  • Who sets the criteria for citizenship?

  • How old must a person be?

  • How many years do you have to live in Canada?

  • What is one of the greatest benefits of Canadian citizenship?

ACTIVATING QUESTIONSDo you remember?


Becoming a canadian citizen chapter 2

  • 1. Describe the difference between naturalization and denaturalization.

    • Naturalization (or naturalisation) is the acquisition of citizenship and nationality by somebody who was not a citizen of that country at the time of birth.

    • Denaturalization is the reverse of naturalization, when a state deprives one of its citizens of his or her citizenship. From the point of view of the individual, denaturalization means "revocation" or "loss" of citizenship.


Becoming a canadian citizen chapter 2

  • 2. What is an example of denaturalization?

    • Share examples from class.

    • Ernst Zundel, a permanent resident of Canada for many years, was jailed for publishing hate literature. In 2005, he was deported back to Germany, where he was placed on trial for denying the Holocaust and inciting racial hatred.


Becoming a canadian citizen chapter 2

  • 3. What reasons would you give to new immigrants to become citizens?

    • Answers will vary.

    • Link to Canadian Identity.

    • You will have rights.

    • Able to vote.

    • Able to run in elections.

    • Able to get memberships (law/medical)


Becoming a canadian citizen chapter 2

  • 4. Create a two-column chart. In the left column list criteria for Canadian citizenship, in the right column note why you agree or disagree with each criterion.


Becoming a canadian citizen chapter 2

  • 5. Create a diagram showing the steps to becoming a Canadian citizen.

    • Must apply for permanent residence

    • Are classified into a category of immigrant: skilled worker, business, family, international adoption

    • Must have a medical examination and are provided with funds to cover living expenses for six months

    • They must provide education and employment documentation

    • Must complete a form and pay a fee($200)

    • Take an oral/written test in French or English based on their knowledge of Canada

    • Once received notice they will Take an Oath of Citizenship

    • They will then receive the official CERTIFICATE OF CANADIAN CITIZENSHIP


Becoming a canadian citizen chapter 2

  • 6. List some of the restrictions that non-citizens experience in Canada. Do you think these restrictions are too strict? Not strict enough? What restrictions would you add/remove?

    • In Canada, non-citizens face restrictions:

    • They cannot vote or fun for elected office

    • They may be forbidden to work in different provinces

    • They may be exempt from membership in professional associations (such as law and medical associations)

    • They may be exempt from the rights and privileges that Canadian citizens enjoy

    • What are the most valuable aspects of your Canadian citizenship? Would you add/remove these as restrictions to non-citizens?


Becoming a canadian citizen chapter 2

  • 7. Describe an example of someone who was granted citizenship as an honour.

    • Raoul Wallenberg of Sweden, the first honorary citizen of Canada after his death. He risked his life saving tens of thousands of Hungarian Jews from being killed during the Holocaust.

    • Nelson Mandela

    • http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/story/2001/11/19/mandela_011119.html


Becoming a canadian citizen chapter 2

  • Interesting fact:

  • 85% of immigrants to Canada become citizens…..what is immigration…how do you become an immigrant to Canada…that is NEXT!


Becoming a canadian citizen chapter 2

  • TODAY’S ACTIVITY!

  • Analyze the two oaths of citizenship on page 6 (also copied in your notes).

  • Which do you think reflects Canadian values?

  • Explain your response.


Becoming a canadian citizen chapter 2

ALL PERIOD DAY!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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