A comparative analysis of social networks among older people in eastern and western european states
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A comparative analysis of social networks among older people in Eastern and Western European states. Laura Banks Research Fellow HSPRC, University of Brighton [email protected] With Dr Phil Haynes and Professor Michael Hill

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A comparative analysis of social networks among older people in eastern and western european states

A comparative analysis of social networks among older people in Eastern and Western European states

Laura Banks

Research Fellow

HSPRC, University of Brighton

[email protected]

With Dr Phil Haynes and Professor Michael Hill

This work is supported by UK ESRC research grant: RES-000-22-2114


Background to project
Background to project in Eastern and Western European states

  • Comparing older people’s social networks in 18 countries including 3 Eastern European (and 5 non-European)

  • Using a 50+ sample from the ISSP 2001 dataset

  • Key variables include contact with close and extended relatives, friends and social and community groups.


Research questions
Research Questions in Eastern and Western European states

  • What are the differences in the level of family contact between Western and Eastern Europe?

  • Which social factors are associated with the differences in family contact?

  • marital status

  • household and family size

  • geographical mobility

  • other social networks (friends and social participation)

  • employment

  • attitudes to caring

  • national expenditure on care

  • national prosperity


Frequency of family contact
Frequency of family contact in Eastern and Western European states

  • How often see adult child


See adult child at least once a week
% see adult child at least once a week in Eastern and Western European states


See adult child at least once a week1
% see adult child at least once a week in Eastern and Western European states


Factor analysis score on contact with close relatives
Factor analysis score on contact with close in Eastern and Western European statesrelatives


Close relative factor score in Eastern and Western European states


Close relative factor score
Close relative factor score in Eastern and Western European states


Who would turn to spouse first for help when ill
% who would turn to spouse first for help when ill in Eastern and Western European states

r= -0.682 p=0.10


Who would turn to adult child first for help when ill
% who would turn to adult child first for help when ill in Eastern and Western European states


Relationship between divorce rate oecd and family contact
Relationship between divorce rate (OECD) and family contact in Eastern and Western European states

r= -0.666 p= 0.013


Household size
Household size in Eastern and Western European states





Close friends
Close friends contact











Summary
Summary contact

In comparison with Western Europe, respondents from Eastern Europe were more likely to:

  • Have higher levels of family contact

  • Turn first to an adult child for support when ill (even when controlling for marital status)

  • Live in larger households and (when controlling for marital status) less likely to live in a single person household, despite having fewer children on average

  • Have lived in the same town or community for a longer period of time

  • Report having a smaller number of close friends

  • Report having lower participation in social and community groups and organisations

  • Have a lower rate of female labour market participation

  • Agree with the belief that adult children have a duty to look after their parents in old age

  • Be living in a country with relatively low GDP per head and low public expenditure on long-term care as a percentage of GDP

    However, family contact was still significantly higher in Southern Europe


Factors most significantly associated with high family contact
Factors most significantly associated with high family contact

  • Social participation (r= -0.844)

  • Length of time in community (r= +0.760)

  • % of female respondents in employment (r= -0.731)

  • Public expenditure on long-term care (r= -0.840)

  • % of 65+ in long-term care institutions (r= -0.784)


A comparative analysis of social networks among older people in eastern and western european states1

A comparative analysis of social networks among older people in Eastern and Western European states

Laura Banks

Research Fellow

HSPRC, University of Brighton

[email protected]

With Dr Phil Haynes and Professor Michael Hill

This work is supported by UK ESRC research grant: RES-000-22-2114


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