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NC Division of Water Quality Water Quality Assessments and Local Watershed Plans

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NC Division of Water Quality Water Quality Assessments and Local Watershed Plans. DWQ Tasks. Compile and review existing data What is known about the watershed What needs to be known to help develop management strategies to improve water quality Develop a monitoring plan

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Presentation Transcript
slide1

NC Division of Water Quality

Water Quality Assessments

and

Local Watershed Plans

dwq tasks
DWQ Tasks
  • Compile and review existing data
    • What is known about the watershed
    • What needs to be known to help develop management strategies to improve water quality
  • Develop a monitoring plan
    • Conduct appropriate assessments, e.g. chemical, biological, etc.
  • Report on results integrating results of all assessments
types of water quality assessments conducted by dwq
Types of Water Quality Assessments Conducted by DWQ
  • Chemical Monitoring (includes field measurements)
  • Biological Monitoring – benthos and/or fish
  • Habitat Assessments
  • Wetland Functional Assessments (new in 2008)
why use chemical monitoring
Quantitative

Can pinpoint locations of problems

Identify the specific nature of problems

Expensive

Requires many samples to characterize pollutant effects in a watershed

A sample represents only a single point in time

Why Use Chemical Monitoring?

Benefits

Limitations

types of measurements
Types of Measurements
  • Field – Dissolved Oxygen, pH, specific conductance, water temperature
  • Nutrients – Nitrogen and phosphorous
  • Solids (e.g. total suspended solids)
  • Turbidity
  • Metals
why conduct biological monitoring
Aquatic organisms found in all habitats

Easily and inexpensively collected

Integrates the effect of mixtures of pollutants over the life cycle of the organism

Semi-quantitative

Does not identify the source of pollution or the specific pollutants

Seasonality & taxonomic inconsistencies

Why Conduct Biological Monitoring?

Benefits

Limitations

benthic macroinvertebrates
Benthic Macroinvertebrates
  • Benthic- The community of organisms living in or on the bottom or other substrate in an aquatic environment
  • Macro - Large enough to be seen by the unaided eye and which can be retained by a U.S. standard no. 30 seive (0.6 mm openings)
  • Invertebrate - animals without backbones
benthic macroinvertebrates include
Benthic MacroinvertebratesInclude

E

Mayfly

  • Ephemeroptera - Mayflies
  • Plecoptera - Stoneflies
  • Trichoptera - Caddisflies
  • Odonata - Damsel and Dragonflies
  • Coleoptera - Beetles
  • Megaloptera - Dobson and Alderflies
  • Diptera - True Flies
  • Oligochaeta - Aquatic Worms
  • Crustacea - Crayfish, Amphipods, Isopods
  • Mollusca - Snails and Clams

P

Stonefly

T

Caddisfly

slide10

P

T

E

assigning bioclassifications using macroinvertebrates
Assigning BioclassificationsUsing Macroinvertebrates
  • Taxa Richness (number of species)
    • Total number of species
    • Total number of EPT species
  • Biotic Index (uses a species’ tolerance to pollution and measures of species abundances)
    • Species are assigned a “tolerance value” (range 0 to 10)
    • A Biotic Index (BI; range 0 to 10) is a weighted average of the “abundance” and “tolerance value”
    • Higher BI values indicate poorer conditions (i.e., more tolerant species present)
slide14

NC Division of Water Quality

Tom Yocum (336) 771-4953

Steven Kroeger (919) 733-9726

Contact Information:

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