Best feet forward
Download
1 / 26

Best Feet Forward - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 324 Views
  • Updated On :

Module 4.1.2. Best Feet Forward. Footcare for People with Diabetes Level 3. Acknowledgements. The foot diagrams and resources used in this presentation are adapted from Feet can last a life time. A health professionals guide to preventing diabetes foot problems.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Best Feet Forward' - medwin


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Best feet forward l.jpg

Module 4.1.2

Best Feet Forward

Footcare for People with Diabetes

Level 3

Produced by The Alfred Workforce Development Team

on behalf of DHS Public Health -

Diabetes Prevention and Management Initiative

June 2005


Acknowledgements l.jpg
Acknowledgements

  • The foot diagrams and resources used in this presentation are adapted from

    Feet can last a life time. A health professionals guide to preventing diabetes foot problems.

    National Diabetes Education Program www.ndep.nih.gov/resources/health.htm

DPMI Workforce Development – The Alfred Workforce Development Team June 2005


Workshop purpose level 3 l.jpg
Workshop purpose – Level 3

Target

Aged care workers, HACC workers, consumers and carers

Objective

  • To provide training to increase skills in:

    • Why people with diabetes are at risk of foot problems

    • How to care for the feet of people with diabetes to prevent problems

    • Identifying foot problems

    • Action to take for foot problems

DPMI Workforce Development – The Alfred Workforce Development Team June 2005


Overview of diabetes l.jpg

G

G

G

G

G

Overview of diabetes

Bloodstream

  • Diabetes means that blood glucose in the body (often called blood sugar) is too high.

  • Glucose comes from the food we eat

  • Glucose is transported by the blood stream to all the cells in the body.

Muscle

G

G

G

G

DPMI Workforce Development – The Alfred Workforce Development Team June 2005


Overview of diabetes5 l.jpg
Overview of diabetes

  • Insulin helps the glucose from food get into your cells.

  • Insulin is a chemical (a hormone) made in a part of the body called the pancreas.

G

G

Muscle

G

G

insulin

Pancreas

DPMI Workforce Development – The Alfred Workforce Development Team June 2005


Overview of diabetes6 l.jpg
Overview of diabetes

  • If your body doesn't make enough insulin or if the insulin doesn't work the way it should, glucose can't get into cells.

  • Glucose stays in the blood.

  • Blood glucose levels get too high, causing diabetes.

Muscle

G

G

G

G

G

Bloodstream

G

G

G

DPMI Workforce Development – The Alfred Workforce Development Team June 2005


Common types of diabetes l.jpg
Common types of diabetes

DPMI Workforce Development – The Alfred Workforce Development Team June 2005


Treatment goals l.jpg
Treatment goals

  • Symptom free

  • Prevent short term complications

  • Prevent long term complications

  • Quality of life =

    Lifestyle focus

DPMI Workforce Development – The Alfred Workforce Development Team June 2005


Complications of diabetes l.jpg
Complications of diabetes

  • Diabetes can cause increased risk of:

    • Heart Problems

    • Stroke

    • Eye sight problems

    • Kidney problems

    • Foot problems

DPMI Workforce Development – The Alfred Workforce Development Team June 2005


Foot problems l.jpg
Foot problems

  • The feet can be affected by:

    • Decreased blood supply poor healing

    • Nerve damage loss of feeling

    • High Blood Sugar levels decrease healing

DPMI Workforce Development – The Alfred Workforce Development Team June 2005


Assessment and awareness l.jpg
Assessment and awareness

  • Regular assessment of feet is important to check for:

    • Sense of feeling and pulses in the feet

    • Foot problems/deformities or past history of foot ulcer

    • If foot problems are present feet referral to a podiatrist is recommended.

DPMI Workforce Development – The Alfred Workforce Development Team June 2005


Assessment and awareness12 l.jpg
Assessment and awareness

  • Always be aware of High Risk Feet

    • Loss of feeling

    • Poor blood supply

    • Past history of foot ulcer

Source: Footcare in Diabetes Workbook for Health Professionals. Australian Diabetes Educators Association

DPMI Workforce Development – The Alfred Workforce Development Team June 2005


Caring for the feet l.jpg
Caring for the feet

  • Check feet every day.

  • Individuals may have serious foot problems, but feel no pain.

  • Check feet for cuts, sores, red spots, swelling, and infected toenails.

  • Make checking feet part of your every day routine.

DPMI Workforce Development – The Alfred Workforce Development Team June 2005


Caring for the feet14 l.jpg
Caring for the feet

  • Wash feet every day

    • Wash feet in warm, not hot, water. Do not soak because skin will get dry.

    • Dry feet well. Be sure to dry between the toes.

DPMI Workforce Development – The Alfred Workforce Development Team June 2005


Caring for the feet15 l.jpg
Caring for the feet

  • Keep the skin soft and smooth

    • Rub a thin coat of skin lotion or cream.

    • Do not put lotion or cream between toes

DPMI Workforce Development – The Alfred Workforce Development Team June 2005


Caring for the feet16 l.jpg
Caring for the feet

  • Smooth corns and calluses

    gently.

    • Check with the doctor/podiatrist before using a pumice stone.

    • Use pumice stone after bathing or showering

    • Don’t cut corns and calluses.

    • Don't use razor blades, corn plasters, or liquid corn and callus removers - they can damage the skin.

DPMI Workforce Development – The Alfred Workforce Development Team June 2005


Caring for the feet17 l.jpg
Caring for the feet

  • Toenails should be trimmed regularly

    • With clippers after bath/shower.

    • Straight across and smooth with an emery board or nail file.

    • don't cut into the corners of the toenail.

    • If toenails are thick or yellowed, or nails curve and grow into the skin, have a podiatrist trim them.

DPMI Workforce Development – The Alfred Workforce Development Team June 2005


Preventing foot problems l.jpg
Preventing foot problems

  • Protect the feet

    • Wear shoes and socks at all times.

    • Choose clean, lightly padded socks that fit well. Socks that have no seams are best

    • Check the insides of shoes

      before putting them on to be

      sure the lining is smooth and

      that there are no objects in them.

DPMI Workforce Development – The Alfred Workforce Development Team June 2005


Preventing foot problems19 l.jpg
Preventing foot problems

  • Protect the feet

    • Wear shoes that fit well and protect the feet.

    • Athletic or walking shoes are good for daily wear. They support the feet and allow them to "breathe."

    • Avoid vinyl or plastic shoes, because they don't stretch or "breathe."

DPMI Workforce Development – The Alfred Workforce Development Team June 2005


Preventing foot problems20 l.jpg
Preventing foot problems

  • Appropriate shoes

    • Pointed toes or high heels put too much pressure on the toes.

    • Shoes also need to be deep and wide enough to prevent rubbing.

DPMI Workforce Development – The Alfred Workforce Development Team June 2005


Preventing foot problems21 l.jpg
Preventing foot problems

  • Protect your feet from hot and cold.

    • Keep your feet away from radiators and open fires.

    • Do not use hot water bottles on feet.

    • Lined boots are good in winter to keep your feet warm and socks at night

    • Remember to use sunscreen on the top of your feet if outside.

DPMI Workforce Development – The Alfred Workforce Development Team June 2005


Preventing foot problems22 l.jpg
Preventing foot problems

  • Keep the blood flowing to the feet.

    • Keep feet up when sitting.

    • Exercises for the feet

      • Wiggle toes for 5 minutes, 2 or 3 times a day

      • Move ankles up and down and in and out.

    • Don’t

      • Cross legs

      • Wear tight socks, elastic or rubber bands, or garters around your legs.

    • Don't smoke

      • Smoking reduces blood flow to feet.

    • Control

      • Blood glucose, blood pressure and cholesterol.

DPMI Workforce Development – The Alfred Workforce Development Team June 2005


Healthy eating l.jpg
Healthy Eating

  • Control blood glucose and blood fats

  • Body weight

  • Healthy food

    • Regular carbohydrate

    • High in fibre

    • Low in fat (particularly saturated fat)

    • Low in added sugar

    • Adequate energy /protein/fluids/vits and mins

DPMI Workforce Development – The Alfred Workforce Development Team June 2005


Exercise activity l.jpg
Exercise / Activity

  • 30 minutes moderate intensity on most days preferably all

  • Helps to:

    • Increased insulin sensitivity

    • Decreased insulin requirements

    • Weight reduction

    • Lipid control

    • Blood pressure control

DPMI Workforce Development – The Alfred Workforce Development Team June 2005


Identification of a problem l.jpg
Identification of a problem

  • Daily inspection of the feet note:

    • Broken skin

    • Redness

    • Swelling

    • Corns/callus

    • Black/blue areas

      Report to nurse/GP or podiatrist for assessment if you detect any of these problems

DPMI Workforce Development – The Alfred Workforce Development Team June 2005


Prevention is better than cure l.jpg
Prevention is better than cure!

  • Prevention and early identification of foot problems can prevent foot ulcers and amputation

Source: Footcare in Diabetes Workbook for Health Professionals. Australian Diabetes Educators Association

DPMI Workforce Development – The Alfred Workforce Development Team June 2005


ad