Chaos should not stand for c hief or captain h as a rrived o n s cene
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CHAOS Should Not Stand For C hief (or Captain) H as A rrived O n S cene. Fire-Rescue International Chicago, IL – August 2010 ================================== Steve Prziborowski. Objectives:. Define the key components of an effective incident size-up

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CHAOS Should Not Stand For C hief (or Captain) H as A rrived O n S cene

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CHAOS Should NotStand For Chief (or Captain) Has Arrived On Scene

Fire-Rescue International

Chicago, IL – August 2010

==================================

Steve Prziborowski


Objectives:

Define the key components of an effective incident size-up

Utilize ICS to effectively manage an incident

Create a template to use for broadcasting a radio report on conditions


Objectives:

Define the 10 basic responsibilities of the first-due Chief (or Company) officer

Using simulated incidents, determine objectives specific to the type of incident they may be faced with


The First-Due Chief (or Captain):

Will either set the incident up for success or for failure

Will either be the “hero” or the “zero”

Needs to be able to manage the incident from “A to Z”

Needs to always be thinking 5 steps ahead, 5 minutes ahead, plan b, c, d, etc.


Why should CHAOS never stand for Chief (or Captain) has arrived on scene?


Need I Say More?


What Are The

Top 10

Contributing Factors

To Firefighter

Line-Of-Duty-Deaths?


Top 10 Contributing LODD Factors:

Command and Control

Fire Behavior

Building Construction

Human / Cultural Items

Communications

Safety / Staffing

Water Supply


Top 10 Contributing LODD Factors:

Fire Prevention

Ventilation

Standard Operating Procedures / Guidelines


CHAOS:

C = Command & Control

H = Have a plan (IAP)

A = Apparatus placement & Accountability

O = Organize your resources

S = Size-up & Support the incident


10 Basic Responsibilities:

Safety & accountability of responders and bystanders

Effectivecommand & controlofthe entire incident, from start to finish

ContinuousSize-up &Radio reports


10 Basic Responsibilities:

Command & Strategic mode determination

Incident action plan creation & implementation

Apparatus placement & Equipment utilization

Hose line placement & selection


10 Basic Responsibilities:

Ensure sufficient & appropriateresources & personnel are responding or notified.

Incident benchmark accomplishment & documentation

Transfer Command / Close out the incident


#1 – Safety & Accountability

Determine go / no-go

Call additional resources early

Dedicated Safety Officer

Proper span-of-control

Proactive & continual situationalawareness & risk / hazard analysis


#1 – Safety & Accountability

Provide for Rehab

Provide for 2 in / 2 out & RIC/RIT/FAST

Proper PPE usage

Ensure accountability

Thermal Imaging Camera usage

Establish trigger points


#2 – Command & Control

Fixed command post known by all

Command presence is essential

Effective & appropriate communications

Determine the Incident Priorities

If you don’t control your personnel, they will find something to do


#3 – Size-up & Radio Reports

Size-up versus Radio Report – what’s the difference?


#3 – Size-up & Radio Reports

Size-up is continuous:

starting when you got on the job

continuing to before the incident

while enroute

upon arrival (360 degree hot lap)

throughout incident


#3 – Size-up & Radio Reports

Lloyd Layman’s FPODP

Facts

Probabilities

Own situation

Decision

Plan


W = Water Supply

A = Area

L = Life Safety

L = Location/Extent

A = Apparatus

C = Construction / Collapse Potential

E = Exposures

W = Weather

A = Auxiliary Appliances

S = Special Matters

H = Height

O = Occupancy

T = Time of Day

#3 – Size-up & Radio Reports


#3 – Size-up & Radio Reports

Two types of Radio Reports:

Initial:

upon arrival, 30 seconds or less, paint the picture & set the stage

Follow-up:

assign incoming resources, provide updated incident information


#3 – Size-up & Radio Reports

INITIAL radio report:

Unit I.D.

Brief description of situation

Obvious conditions

Brief description of action taken

Command mode and command post location


#3 – Size-up & Radio Reports

INITIAL radio report:

Strategic mode

Obvious safety concerns

Additional resources & staging area

Corrected address (if applicable)


#3 – Size-up & Radio Reports

FOLLOW-UP radio report:

Any concerns not initially mentioned

Assignments for arriving units/personnel

Additional resource requests (max of 3 at a time)

Personnel filling key positions

CAN reports (Conditions, Actions, Needs)


#3 – Size-up & Radio Reports

Don’t forget:

2 in / 2 out: established or not established

Who will lay supply lines

Strategic mode

Command post location

Staging area


#3 – Size-up & Radio Reports

The following radio report assumes:

Your first alarm is 3 engines, 1 truck, 1 rescue and 1 chief officer

Engines 1, 2 & 3, Truck 1, Battalion 1, Rescue 1

Responding units are staffed with 3 or 4

Obviously assignments may changed based on your staffing & resource levels, not to mention your SOP/SOGs


#3 – Size-up & Radio Reports

The following radio report assumes:

Your first alarm is 3 engines, 1 truck, 1 rescue and 1 chief officer

Engines 1, 2 & 3, Truck 1, Battalion 1, Rescue 1

Responding units are staffed with 3 or 4

Obviously assignments may changed based on your staffing & resource levels, not to mention your SOP/SOGs


#3 – Size-up & Radio Reports

Unit Identifier at scene: “Engine 1 on scene”

Brief description of incident situation: “We have a two story house,”

Obvious Conditions:“Fire showing from the second floor, Alpha side of building”


#3 – Size-up & Radio Reports

Brief Description of Action Taken: “Engine 1 will be deploying 1 ¾” hose lines and securing our own water supply, hydrant in front of house.”

Command mode &command post location: “Engine 1 will be assuming Main Street IC, command post will be at Engine 1”


#3 – Size-up & Radio Reports

Declaration of Strategic Mode: “This will be an offensive fire attack”

Indication of the need for additional resources:“Dispatch a 2nd alarm; staging will be at 2nd and Main street.”


#3 – Size-up & Radio Reports

Assign arriving units (part 1):

-“Engine 2, you will be assigned Division 2, you’ll have my firefighter.

-Your tacticalobjectives are to:

Locate & confine the fire

Obtain an all clear on primary search

Two-in, two-out will be established with the IC & the driver of Engine 1.”


#3 – Size-up & Radio Reports

Assign arriving units (part 2):

-“Truck 1, you’ll be assigned ventilation group

-Your tacticalobjectives will be to:

Provide ventilation

Secure utilities, and

Ladder the building.”


#3 – Size-up & Radio Reports

Assign arriving units (part 3):

-“Engine 3, you’ll be assigned to Division 2, Engine 2 Captain is the supervisor;

-Your tacticalobjectives will be to:

Assist Division 2 with a back-up hoseline

Check for extension.”


#3 – Size-up & Radio Reports

Assign arriving units (part 4):

-“Rescue 1, you’ll be assigned as RIC 1,

-Your tacticalobjectives will be to:

Secure a RIC tool cache

Soften the building

Begin the accountability process


#4 – Command & Strategic Mode

Command Modes:

Nothing showing / Fast attack / Fixed command

Strategic Modes:

Offensive / Defensive / Marginal or transitional


Incident priorities

Command mode

Strategic mode

Incident / Strategic objectives

Tactical objectives

Communications

Safety issues

Benchmarks

Notifications

#5 – Incident Action Plan


#6 – Apparatus Placement/Utilization

Engines:1st due, 2nd due, 3rd due

Trucks:1st due, 2nd due

Rescues:1st due, 2nd due

Chiefs:1st due, 2nd due, 3rd due

Specialty Apparatus:


#7 – Hoseline Placement & Selection

One of the most critical decisions

Keep fire contained to the “box”

Remember the incident priorities

Hose line considerations – 1st, 2nd, 3rd

Big fire = big water

Don’t forget back-up hose line

2nd water supply?

Capabilities of hose lines & nozzles


#8 – Sufficient Resources/Personnel

Go ugly, go early

Limit to three (3) at a time

Trust your gut instinct

At least one unit in staging for room & contents

Full alarm in staging for more than room & contents

How long does mutual aid take???


On scene / report on conditions

Command established / location

Staging location

Strategic mode

Water supply

2 in / 2 out (or not)

All clear

Secondary search

Fire contained

Fire knock down

Incident under control

PARs

Key ICS positions being filled

#9 – Incident Benchmarks


Transfer of Command briefing

Get officers together for overhaul plan

Fire investigation plan

Demobilization plan

Tailboard session

Responder / Occupant wellness

Incident documentation

Prepare for PIA

Fire watch

#10 – Incident Termination


Questions?

Thank you very much for your time!

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CONTACT INFORMATION:

Steve Prziborowski

408-205-9006

[email protected]

www.code3firetraining.com

www.chabotfire.com


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