Major lifestyle changes the middle ages to 1800
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Major Lifestyle Changes: The Middle Ages to 1800. 1450 to 1750: Beginning of commerce. 1450 to 1750: Beginning of commerce. No monetary system in place. 1450 to 1750: Beginning of commerce. No monetary system in place. Bartering was used exclusively. 1450 to 1750: Beginning of commerce.

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Major lifestyle changes the middle ages to 1800

Major Lifestyle Changes:The Middle Ages to 1800



1450 to 1750 beginning of commerce1
1450 to 1750: Beginning of commerce

  • No monetary system in place.


1450 to 1750 beginning of commerce2
1450 to 1750: Beginning of commerce

  • No monetary system in place.

  • Bartering was used exclusively.


1450 to 1750 beginning of commerce3
1450 to 1750: Beginning of commerce

  • No monetary system in place.

  • Bartering was used exclusively.

    • Trading what you have for what you want.


1450 to 1750 beginning of commerce4
1450 to 1750: Beginning of commerce

  • No monetary system in place.

  • Bartering was used exclusively.

    • Trading what you have for what you want.

  • Manors grew what they could and bartered for the rest.


1450 to 1750 beginning of commerce5
1450 to 1750: Beginning of commerce

  • No monetary system in place.

  • Bartering was used exclusively.

    • Trading what you have for what you want.

  • Manors grew what they could and bartered for the rest.

  • This system encouraged specialization in goods.


1450 to 1750 beginning of commerce6
1450 to 1750: Beginning of commerce

  • No monetary system in place.

  • Bartering was used exclusively.

    • Trading what you have for what you want.

  • Manors grew what they could and bartered for the rest.

  • This system encouraged specialization in goods.

    • Increasing profits helped to sustain the new system.


Change in the wind
Change in the Wind:

  • Farming improvements led to more food being produced.


Change in the wind1
Change in the Wind:

  • Farming improvements led to more food being produced.

  • Leads to population increases


Change in the wind2
Change in the Wind:

  • Farming improvements led to more food being produced.

  • Leads to population increases

  • Increased market demand for cloth due to population increases.


Change in the wind3
Change in the Wind:

  • Farming improvements led to more food being produced.

  • Leads to population increases

  • Increased market demand for cloth due to population increases.

  • Cottage Industry: textile manufacturing in the home with all members of the family helping make cloth.


Change in the wind4
Change in the Wind:

  • Farming improvements led to more food being produced.

  • Leads to population increases

  • Increased market demand for cloth due to population increases.

  • Cottage Industry: textile manufacturing in the home with all members of the family helping make cloth.

  • This leads us to the INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION.




Industrial revolution2
Industrial Revolution

  • 1750-1800:

    • the European manufacturing process shifted from small, home production to large-scale, machine production.


Industrial revolution3
Industrial Revolution

  • 1750-1800:

    • the European manufacturing process shifted from small, home production to large-scale, machine production.

    • Started in the textile industry.


Industrial revolution4
Industrial Revolution

  • 1750-1800:

    • the European manufacturing process shifted from small, home production to large-scale, machine production.

    • Started in the textile industry.

    • Factory System: machines and workers brought together in large buildings.


Industrial revolution5
Industrial Revolution

  • 1750-1800:

    • the European manufacturing process shifted from small, home production to large-scale, machine production.

    • Started in the textile industry.

    • Factory System: machines and workers brought together in large buildings.

    • Division of labor: Each worker did one specific part of the process.


Inventions
Inventions:

  • Major Inventions Changed the Textile Industry


Inventions1
Inventions:

  • Major Inventions Changed the Textile Industry

    • Spinning Jenny: James Hartgrove 1768


Inventions2
Inventions:

  • Major Inventions Changed the Textile Industry

    • Spinning Jenny: James Hartgrove 1768

    • Water Frame: Richard Arkwright


Inventions3
Inventions:

  • Major Inventions Changed the Textile Industry

    • Spinning Jenny: James Hartgrove 1768

    • Water Frame: Richard Arkwright

    • Cotton Gin: Eli Whitney 1793


Inventions4
Inventions:

  • Major Inventions Changed the Textile Industry

    • Spinning Jenny: James Hartgrove 1768

    • Water Frame: Richard Arkwright

    • Cotton Gin: Eli Whitney 1793

  • Transportation Increases


Inventions5
Inventions:

  • Major Inventions Changed the Textile Industry

    • Spinning Jenny: James Hartgrove 1768

    • Water Frame: Richard Arkwright

    • Cotton Gin: Eli Whitney 1793

  • Transportation Increases

    • Better Roads


Inventions6
Inventions:

  • Major Inventions Changed the Textile Industry

    • Spinning Jenny: James Hartgrove 1768

    • Water Frame: Richard Arkwright

    • Cotton Gin: Eli Whitney 1793

  • Transportation Increases

    • Better Roads

    • Canals (human-made waterways)


Inventions7
Inventions:

  • Major Inventions Changed the Textile Industry

    • Spinning Jenny: James Hartgrove 1768

    • Water Frame: Richard Arkwright

    • Cotton Gin: Eli Whitney 1793

  • Transportation Increases

    • Better Roads

    • Canals (human-made waterways)

    • Railroads


Inventions8
Inventions:

  • Major Inventions Changed the Textile Industry

    • Spinning Jenny: James Hartgrove 1768

    • Water Frame: Richard Arkwright

    • Cotton Gin: Eli Whitney 1793

  • Transportation Increases

    • Better Roads

    • Canals (human-made waterways)

    • Railroads

    • Steam Engines: Developed by James Watt


Inventions9
Inventions:

  • Steam engine: James Watts 1785, revolutionized factory work.



Powering the industrial revolution1
Powering the Industrial Revolution:

  • Started with Water Power: Machines worked due to the flow of water wheels built on rivers.


Powering the industrial revolution2
Powering the Industrial Revolution:

  • Started with Water Power: Machines worked due to the flow of water wheels built on rivers.

  • Steam engines: Steam boats by 1808 used to transport goods and people across the water much faster with larger amounts.



Fueling the machines1
Fueling the machines:

  • Factories need fuel to run the machines: COAL


Fueling the machines2
Fueling the machines:

  • Factories need fuel to run the machines: COAL

  • Coal mining expands: Production doubles from 1750 to 1800.


Fueling the machines3
Fueling the machines:

  • Factories need fuel to run the machines: COAL

  • Coal mining expands: Production doubles from 1750 to 1800.

  • Large cities grow up near coal and iron fields.




Labor issues1
Labor issues

  • The raw wool and cotton that fed the British textile mills came from:


Labor issues2
Labor issues

  • The raw wool and cotton that fed the British textile mills came from:

    • Lands converted from farming to raising sheep, leaving farm workers without jobs


Labor issues3
Labor issues

  • The raw wool and cotton that fed the British textile mills came from:

    • Lands converted from farming to raising sheep, leaving farm workers without jobs

    • Urbanization: movement of people from rural to urban (city) areas



Conditions in the cities1
Conditions in the cities:

  • Housing, water, sewers, food supplies, and lighting were completely inadequate.


Conditions in the cities2
Conditions in the cities:

  • Housing, water, sewers, food supplies, and lighting were completely inadequate.

  • Slums grew and disease destroyed the population.


Conditions in the cities3
Conditions in the cities:

  • Housing, water, sewers, food supplies, and lighting were completely inadequate.

  • Slums grew and disease destroyed the population.

  • Crime increased and became a way of life for those who could make a living in no other way.



Conditions in the countryside1
Conditions in the countryside:

  • The only successful farmers were those with large landholdings who could afford agricultural innovations.


Conditions in the countryside2
Conditions in the countryside:

  • The only successful farmers were those with large landholdings who could afford agricultural innovations.

  • Most peasants:


Conditions in the countryside3
Conditions in the countryside:

  • The only successful farmers were those with large landholdings who could afford agricultural innovations.

  • Most peasants:

    • Didn’t have enough land to support themselves


Conditions in the countryside4
Conditions in the countryside:

  • The only successful farmers were those with large landholdings who could afford agricultural innovations.

  • Most peasants:

    • Didn’t have enough land to support themselves

    • Were forced to move to the cities to find work in the factories.



The role of the railroads1
The role of the railroads:

  • Built during the 1830s and 1840s:


The role of the railroads2
The role of the railroads:

  • Built during the 1830s and 1840s:

    • Enabled people to leave the place of their birth and migrate easily to the cities.


The role of the railroads3
The role of the railroads:

  • Built during the 1830s and 1840s:

    • Enabled people to leave the place of their birth and migrate easily to the cities.

    • Allowed cheaper and more rapid transport of raw materials and finished products.



Conditions in the factories1
Conditions in the factories:

  • All working people, however, faced possible unemployment, with little or no provision for security.


Conditions in the factories2
Conditions in the factories:

  • All working people, however, faced possible unemployment, with little or no provision for security.

  • In addition, they were subject to various kinds of discipline:


Conditions in the factories3
Conditions in the factories:

  • All working people, however, faced possible unemployment, with little or no provision for security.

  • In addition, they were subject to various kinds of discipline:

    • The closing of factory gates to late workers


Conditions in the factories4
Conditions in the factories:

  • All working people, however, faced possible unemployment, with little or no provision for security.

  • In addition, they were subject to various kinds of discipline:

    • The closing of factory gates to late workers

    • Fines for tardiness


Conditions in the factories5
Conditions in the factories:

  • All working people, however, faced possible unemployment, with little or no provision for security.

  • In addition, they were subject to various kinds of discipline:

    • The closing of factory gates to late workers

    • Fines for tardiness

    • Long Hours- 12 hour days


Conditions in the factories6
Conditions in the factories:

  • All working people, however, faced possible unemployment, with little or no provision for security.

  • In addition, they were subject to various kinds of discipline:

    • The closing of factory gates to late workers

    • Fines for tardiness

    • Long Hours- 12 hour days

    • Beatings for not doing their “best”



Changes to the family1
Changes to the family:

  • Decline of cottage industries + Increase in factories = family life changed.


Changes to the family2
Changes to the family:

  • Decline of cottage industries + Increase in factories = family life changed.

    • At first, the entire family, including the children, worked in the factory, just as they had at home.


Changes to the family3
Changes to the family:

  • Decline of cottage industries + Increase in factories = family life changed.

    • At first, the entire family, including the children, worked in the factory, just as they had at home.

    • Later, family life became fragmented (the father worked in the factory, the mother handled domestic chores, the children went to school).



Gender roles defined1
Gender roles defined:

  • This brought about the ideas of gender roles.


Gender roles defined2
Gender roles defined:

  • This brought about the ideas of gender roles.

    • Women came to be associated with domestic duties, such as housekeeping, food preparation, child rearing and nurturing, and household management.


Gender roles defined3
Gender roles defined:

  • This brought about the ideas of gender roles.

    • Women came to be associated with domestic duties, such as housekeeping, food preparation, child rearing and nurturing, and household management.

    • The man came to be the “Bread winner”


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