Don t Hit the Wall: Nutrition 101 for the Marathon

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Don t Hit the Wall: Nutrition 101 for the Marathon

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1. Don?t Hit the Wall: Nutrition 101 for the Marathon ?Hitting the Wall? and ?Bonking? are terms used to describe the feeling of muscle glycogen depletion? literally cannot move another muscle fiber.?Hitting the Wall? and ?Bonking? are terms used to describe the feeling of muscle glycogen depletion? literally cannot move another muscle fiber.

2. Carbohydrate ? A Runner?s Friend Spares muscle glycogen Consume before, during and after long runs Not all created equally Simple vs. complex Enriched vs. whole grain Inadequate carbohydrate intake can lead to: Protein/muscle breakdown Decreased ability to burn body fat

3. Protein ? Why Do We Need It? Immune function Hormone production Repair damaged muscle tissue (foot strike) Optimize carbohydrate storage in muscles ? eat carbohydrate + protein after long runs Help stabilize blood sugar levels when consumed with a carbohydrate meal/snack

4. Fat ? Friend or Foe? Unlimited storage capacity ? 150 lb lean athlete may have 60,000 calories of stored fat Fat not used for energy is easily stored as body fat Fat is not a fast or efficient source of energy ?sluggishness during runs if too much During exercise ? trained vs. untrained people and women vs. men burn a higher % calories as fat Some fat in the diet is necessary to absorb some nutrients, vitamins and anti-oxidants (carotenoids).

5. Choose Healthy Fats Choose These: Avocado Canola oil Fatty fish ? salmon Flax seeds Natural nut butters Nuts, seeds Olives, olive oil Avoid These: Saturated fat High fat animal and dairy products Coconut oil Palm, palm kernal oil Trans fats ? partially hydrogenated oils

6. Get That Fluid On Board! Dehydration can start within 15-20 minutes Fluid intake may not keep up with absorption rate ? maximum repletion rate is about 4 cups per hour Even a 1% fluid loss impairs performance Thirst may not ?kick in? until 2% fluid loss ? or 3 lbs (6 cups) for a 150-lb person Fluid loss will impair performance long before glycogen depletion occurs.Fluid loss will impair performance long before glycogen depletion occurs.

7. Signs of Dehydration Thirst, dry mouth Weakness, fatigue Nausea, vomiting High body temperature Muscle cramps ? legs Dizziness, confusion Weak, rapid heart rate Lack of coordination & judgment

8. Hydrate Morning, Noon and Night Plain water is OK for <60 minutes of exercise Sports beverages (fluid, carbohydrate and sodium) good for >60 minutes of exercise Carry fluid with you at all times! Pre- and During Run or Race: Drink at least 16 oz. (2 cups) fluid 1-2 hours before run Drink 6-12 oz. fluid every 15-20 minutes during run Post-Run or Race: Drink at least 16-24 oz. (2-3 cups) fluid per pound lost Drink until urine is pale or clear For long runs >60 minutes ? sports drinks (like Gatorade) include carbohydrates to help spare muscle glycogen + sodium to help prevent hyponatremia Don?t rely on aid stations at races to supply water/fluid? races have been known to ?run out? of water or sports beverages. Fluid ?sloshing around? in the stomach, stomach cramps, or nausea may be a sign that you are drinking too much? wait at least 15 minutes before taking another drink. For long runs >60 minutes ? sports drinks (like Gatorade) include carbohydrates to help spare muscle glycogen + sodium to help prevent hyponatremia Don?t rely on aid stations at races to supply water/fluid? races have been known to ?run out? of water or sports beverages. Fluid ?sloshing around? in the stomach, stomach cramps, or nausea may be a sign that you are drinking too much? wait at least 15 minutes before taking another drink.

9. Daily Eating, Daily Fuel Eat regularly, every 3 to 4 hours Eat balanced meals ? grain/starch, protein, fruit/vegetable, healthy fat Choose whole grains vs. white enriched Fuel your body with nourishing food! Experiment during training! Do not try something new on race day! Give examples of balanced meals for breakfast, lunch, dinner and snacks: Breakfast ? whole grain cereal, ? sliced banana, chopped walnuts, low fat milk or soy milk Snack ? whole grain bread, natural peanut butter, ? sliced banana Lunch ? hearty bean soup, whole grain roll, baby carrots, fresh apple Snack ? low fat yogurt, melon balls Dinner ? citrus-glazed chicken breast or salmon, wild rice and brown rice pilaf, steamed broccoli, large tossed salad, low fat pudding dessert Snack ? gingersnap cookies, low fat milkGive examples of balanced meals for breakfast, lunch, dinner and snacks: Breakfast ? whole grain cereal, ? sliced banana, chopped walnuts, low fat milk or soy milk Snack ? whole grain bread, natural peanut butter, ? sliced banana Lunch ? hearty bean soup, whole grain roll, baby carrots, fresh apple Snack ? low fat yogurt, melon balls Dinner ? citrus-glazed chicken breast or salmon, wild rice and brown rice pilaf, steamed broccoli, large tossed salad, low fat pudding dessert Snack ? gingersnap cookies, low fat milk

10. The ?Last Meal? - Meal Before the Marathon High carbohydrate ? spare muscle glycogen Easily digestible ? low fat, protein, fiber Size of meal depends on time before start Lots of fluid ? at least 2 cups per hour Avoid alcohol; limit caffeine and sodium Examples: toasted plain bagel with small amount light cream cheese, banana, sports drink bowl of cornflakes with banana and low fat milk/soy milk, sports drink Avoid alcohol during the last 48 hours before the marathon. Limit coffee to 1 cup the morning of the marathon ? and be sure to drink a cup of water before and after the cup of coffee. Too much sodium (which may be difficult if you?re eating away from home) can also contribute to dehydrationExamples: toasted plain bagel with small amount light cream cheese, banana, sports drink bowl of cornflakes with banana and low fat milk/soy milk, sports drink Avoid alcohol during the last 48 hours before the marathon. Limit coffee to 1 cup the morning of the marathon ? and be sure to drink a cup of water before and after the cup of coffee. Too much sodium (which may be difficult if you?re eating away from home) can also contribute to dehydration

11. What About Carbohydrate Loading? Carbohydrate loading - a technique used to load the muscles up with glycogen, which historically involved more drastic measures Try a ?modified? version: Taper or reduce run-training during the week preceding the marathon Continue daily carbohydrate-rich food intake during the week preceding the marathon Consume carbohydrate-rich foods and/or beverages during marathon

12. Fuel-Up During the Marathon Mostly simple, some complex carbohydrates (spare muscle glycogen) Easily digestible and well-tolerated (trial & error) Sports beverage containing water, sugar (7%), sodium and potassium Sports drinks, energy gels, energy bars Avoid anything too concentrated, like undiluted juice or soda Avoid fructose as the first ingredient Experiment with different products during training! You can find out ahead of time what will be offered at aid stations so you can experiment with those products, but it?s always a good idea to carry your own! You never know if it will be easily accessible, if there will be any left by the time you get there? Don?t wait until you?re thirsty to start drinking ? drink 6-12 oz. fluid every 15-20 minutes! Consume small amounts of carbohydrate at regular intervals ? every 15 to 20 minutes ? stick with one form that works, or try alternating different forms (beverage, gel, bar)Experiment with different products during training! You can find out ahead of time what will be offered at aid stations so you can experiment with those products, but it?s always a good idea to carry your own! You never know if it will be easily accessible, if there will be any left by the time you get there? Don?t wait until you?re thirsty to start drinking ? drink 6-12 oz. fluid every 15-20 minutes! Consume small amounts of carbohydrate at regular intervals ? every 15 to 20 minutes ? stick with one form that works, or try alternating different forms (beverage, gel, bar)

13. Recovery Meals First 4-6 hours are crucial for optimal recovery and repair. 15 minutes post ? high carb beverage 2 hours post ? high carb snack, with a little protein, if possible 4 hours post ? high carb meal with moderate protein Choose carbs with high glycemic index for maximal muscle glycogen synthesis Drink until urine is pale or clear! Examples: 15 minutes ? Sports beverage (like Powerade) juice, banana, orange wedges 2 hours ? Bagel, pretzels, yogurt, banana and peanut butter 4 to 6 hours ? Turkey sub on whole grain bread, fresh pear, low fat milk or yogurt or shrimp and pasta primavera, tossed salad, garlic rollExamples: 15 minutes ? Sports beverage (like Powerade) juice, banana, orange wedges 2 hours ? Bagel, pretzels, yogurt, banana and peanut butter 4 to 6 hours ? Turkey sub on whole grain bread, fresh pear, low fat milk or yogurt or shrimp and pasta primavera, tossed salad, garlic roll

14. Vitamins and Minerals Athletes who are at risk for inadequate intake: Restrict energy intake/severe weight loss practices Eliminate one or more food groups from diet Consume high carb, low vit/min-dense foods Women more likely to lack calcium, iron and zinc Some vitamins and minerals compete with each other for absorption (mega doses) Insurance policy ? daily multi-vitamin/mineral, plus extra calcium for women

15. Weight Loss Success Regular physical activity Moderate reductions in calorie intake Healthy eating patterns and behaviors Keep records of food intake, physical activity, and goals Be mentally ready and committed Many people take on the challenge of training to walk or run a marathon ? not only to raise money for a specific cause, such as leukemia ? but also with the hope that weight loss will be easier? after all, you?re training to run 26.2 miles! But keep in mind that you?ll need energy to run this far.Many people take on the challenge of training to walk or run a marathon ? not only to raise money for a specific cause, such as leukemia ? but also with the hope that weight loss will be easier? after all, you?re training to run 26.2 miles! But keep in mind that you?ll need energy to run this far.

16. Keep the Fire Burning! Eat often, every 3 to 4 hours Eat enough to support life! Be physically active most days of the week (run/walk) Pump some iron to help build muscle People who are trying to lose weight sometimes reduce daily calorie intake to levels below the that required to support basic resting metabolism? weight loss may be more difficult if the body senses a starvation threat ? the burning of significant calories via daily training coupled with general lack of food energy intake.People who are trying to lose weight sometimes reduce daily calorie intake to levels below the that required to support basic resting metabolism? weight loss may be more difficult if the body senses a starvation threat ? the burning of significant calories via daily training coupled with general lack of food energy intake.

17. You Can Do It! Is your mental tape supportive and friendly?


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