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pRODUCTION. It don’t come for free!. Quick Check-In. What is the Tragedy of the Commons? What is it’s relevancy to you and I?. 1.3.1 Define each of the productive resources (natural, human, capital) and explain why they are necessary for the production of goods and services.(k).

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Production

pRODUCTION

It don’t come for free!


Quick check in
Quick Check-In

What is the Tragedy of the Commons?

What is it’s relevancy to you and I?


1.3.1 Define each of the productive resources (natural, human, capital) and explain why they are necessary for the production of goods and services.(k)

Natural resources: wood, minerals, water, animals, plants, etc.

Human resources: labour, ideas, intelligence, body tissues, etc.

Capital: private money, bank loans, investments


1.3.2 Describe, with reference to their community or region, the primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary sectors of the economy. (a)

Primary sector: The primary sector of the economy extracts or harvests products from the earth. The primary sector includes the production of raw material and basic foods.

Secondary sector: The secondary sector of the economy manufactures finished goods. All of manufacturing, processing, and construction lies within the secondary sector.


1.3.2 Describe, with reference to their community or region, the primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary sectors of the economy. (a)

Tertiary sector: The tertiary sector of the economy is the service industry. This sector provides services to the general population and to businesses.

Quaternary sector: The quaternary sector of the economy consists of intellectual activities. Activities associated with this sector include government, culture, libraries, scientific research, education, and information technology.


Alert

ALERT!!!!!!!!!!! the primary, secondary, tertiary and

THIS WILL BE ON A QUIZ, TEST, MIDTERM AND EXAM – KNOW IT, BREATHE IT, MAKE IT YOUR NEW BFF!



1 3 3 using examples define the laws of diminishing returns and increasing returns to scale k
1.3.3 Using examples, define the laws of diminishing returns and increasing returns to scale. (k)

Increasing returns: The stage of production in which adding inputs (resources) increases both the total product (how much you make) and marginal product (the difference in value between this product and the last one.)


1 3 3 using examples define the laws of diminishing returns and increasing returns to scale k1
1.3.3 Using examples, define the laws of diminishing returns and increasing returns to scale. (k)

Diminishing returns: The law of diminishing returns states that initially adding inputs (resources) to the production process yields increasing amounts of output (product). However, after a certain point, adding inputs (resources) increases output at a diminishing rate until eventually adding inputs actually decreases output.


Owe my head hurts
Owe! My head hurts! and increasing returns to scale. (k)

To help with the pain here’s an example.

Picture a restaurant on a normal buiness day. Assume you are the manager resonsible for scheduling workers, but you have no experience and are a little slow at figuring things out.


At 6 a m the first customer arrives for breakfast
At 6 A.M. the first customer arrives for breakfast. and increasing returns to scale. (k)


Example continued
Example continued. and increasing returns to scale. (k)

You immediately call up one of your employees and have her rush to work. employee 1 is able to prepare the food, serve it, and then act as a cashier for the transaction. Later, as more customers arrive and begin demanding service, it becomes obvious to you that more help is needed.


So a few more show up
So a few more show up… and increasing returns to scale. (k)


Example continued1
Example continued. and increasing returns to scale. (k)

Taking out your cell phone, you call up Employees 2 and 3 and order them to work. As they settle in and begin working, a division of labour develops, which increases their individual productivity and the total productivity of the restaurant.


Example continued2
Example continued. and increasing returns to scale. (k)

Witnessing the marvelous outcome, you conclude that more is always better and decide to call up Employees 4 through 7. As they begin to work, you notice that the restaurant is able to serve more customers, but the early gains in productivity are beginning to dimish.


Example continued3
Example continued. and increasing returns to scale. (k)

You chalk up these diminishing gains as a fluke, and in order to break through this impasse you bring Employees 8 through 256. Pretty soon, the restaurant's kitchen is full of employees, with every worker pretty much immobilized like a sardine in a can. The customers are now outrages at the extremely slow service and a little freaked out by your lack of management ability. As a matter of fact, with 256 workers, you are unable to produce anything. This is referred to as negative returns.


Look what you ve done
Look what you’ve done! and increasing returns to scale. (k)


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