Moon stuff
Download
1 / 66

Moon stuff - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 71 Views
  • Uploaded on

Moon stuff. Made easy by Bill Frye Moon phases Tides Eclipse stuff. Fryesheet numbers for quiz. Fryesheet #8: 10 – 20, 48 - 52 Fryesheet #10: 1 – 15, 26, 30 – 32, and 43 – 57.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about ' Moon stuff' - mavis


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Moon stuff
Moon stuff

  • Made easy by Bill Frye

  • Moon phases

  • Tides

  • Eclipse stuff


Fryesheet numbers for quiz
Fryesheet numbers for quiz

  • Fryesheet #8: 10 – 20, 48 - 52

  • Fryesheet #10: 1 – 15, 26, 30 – 32, and

    43 – 57


New (couple days)Waxing Crescent (several days)1st QuarterWaxing Gibbous (several days) FullWaning Gibbous (several days)3rd QuarterWaning Crescent (several days)New

Phases:Observing and Identifying

http://www.lpi.usra.edu/education/skytellers/moon_phases/about.shtml


Percent illumination
Percent (%) illumination

  • Gibbous - greater than 50% illumination

  • Crescent – less than 50% illumination


Waxing and waning
Waxing and Waning

  • Waxing means “to grow”

  • Waning – means “to shrink”


Percent illumination1
Percent (%) illumination?

  • What phase is 100% illumination?

  • Full Moon

  • What phase has 0% illumination?

  • New moon

  • http://aa.usno.navy.mil/data/docs/MoonFraction.php


moon phase diagram http://www.mpasd.net/cms/lib6/PA14000136/Centricity/ModuleInstance/2289/my%20moon%20phase%20diagram.bmp

  • See the link above


Where did the term month come from
Where did the term “month” come from?

  • The old English word “moonth.”


Solar day vs sidereal day
Solar day vs. Sidereal day

  • Solar = 24 hours long

  • Sidereal = 23h 56min. 4s (p.24 in text)

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lwVf-AvD8ds


Sidereal month
sidereal month

  • It takes the moon 27 1/3 days to revolve

    one time around the Earth

    FS#8-52 page 205


Synodic month
synodic month

  • 29 ½ days for one – the time between two New Moons (p.205)

  • FS#8-52


Why do we see a full moon but cannot see a new moon
Why do we see a Full Moon but cannot see a New Moon?

  • Because the Moon’s orbit is inclined to the ecliptic 5.2°



Couple more terms
Couple more terms the Moon has to “play catch-up” to the Earth as the Earth-Moon system orbits the Sun.

  • Earthshine – when the earth’s atmosphere reflects sunlight to the Moon illuminating the unlit portion

  • FS#8-12

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zhZ4zgJE2sI


Blue moon
Blue moon the Moon has to “play catch-up” to the Earth as the Earth-Moon system orbits the Sun.

  • – second full moon in a month

  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_moon


Syzygy
Syzygy the Moon has to “play catch-up” to the Earth as the Earth-Moon system orbits the Sun.

  • when 3 (or more) celestial bodies line up (p.205)

  • FS#8-50


Actual path of earth in space fs 10 8
Actual path of Earth in space the Moon has to “play catch-up” to the Earth as the Earth-Moon system orbits the Sun.FS#10-8


Synchronous rotation
Synchronous rotation the Moon has to “play catch-up” to the Earth as the Earth-Moon system orbits the Sun.

  • always keeps same side facing you because it rotates at the same rate that it revolves


Tides
Tides the Moon has to “play catch-up” to the Earth as the Earth-Moon system orbits the Sun.

  • The Moon’s gravity tugs on the Earth.

    • It pulls the most on the part of Earth closest, which raises the atmosphere, the oceans, and even the rocks (a little)

    • It pulls the least on the part of Earth that’s farthest, which allows the oceans and atmosphere to be further from the Moon (and higher)

    • The Sun’s gravity does the same thing, but to a lesser extent


Tides and the moon
Tides and the Moon the Moon has to “play catch-up” to the Earth as the Earth-Moon system orbits the Sun.


Nasa videoclip tides
NASA the Moon has to “play catch-up” to the Earth as the Earth-Moon system orbits the Sun.videoclip - tides

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l37ofe9haMU


Tides1
TIDES the Moon has to “play catch-up” to the Earth as the Earth-Moon system orbits the Sun.

  • High tide is always in the direction of the Moon and on the other side of the Earth

  • Direct high – towards Moon

  • Indirect high – on other side of Earth


Spring
Spring the Moon has to “play catch-up” to the Earth as the Earth-Moon system orbits the Sun.

  • occurs at new and full phases, results in higher than normal high tide, lower than normal low tide


Neap the Moon has to “play catch-up” to the Earth as the Earth-Moon system orbits the Sun.

  • occurs at the quarter phases and results in lower than normal high, higher than normal low tide


Slack water
Slack water the Moon has to “play catch-up” to the Earth as the Earth-Moon system orbits the Sun.

  • “neutral” water level between tides (inter-tidal water level)


Frye s tide post
“Frye’s Tide Post the Moon has to “play catch-up” to the Earth as the Earth-Moon system orbits the Sun.


Tidal bore
Tidal bore the Moon has to “play catch-up” to the Earth as the Earth-Moon system orbits the Sun.

  • When the tide from the ocean pushes into waterways

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LWumonz87rA


Which sides have high tide
Which sides have high tide? the Moon has to “play catch-up” to the Earth as the Earth-Moon system orbits the Sun.


Which sides have low tide
Which sides have low tide? the Moon has to “play catch-up” to the Earth as the Earth-Moon system orbits the Sun.


http://starchildgsfc.nasa.gov/docs/StarChild/questions/question3.htmlhttp://starchildgsfc.nasa.gov/docs/StarChild/questions/question3.html


starchild.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/StarChild/questions/phases.htmlhttp://starchildgsfc.nasa.gov/docs/StarChild/questions/question3.html


Eclipses
Eclipseshttp://starchildgsfc.nasa.gov/docs/StarChild/questions/question3.html

  • The Sun and Moon occasionally line up so that we have an eclipse.

    • Eclipses happen every year

    • To see a solar eclipse, you need to be on a particular part of the Earth

  • websites


Eclipses1
Eclipseshttp://starchildgsfc.nasa.gov/docs/StarChild/questions/question3.html

  • Two parts of a shadow

  • Umbra – dark part

  • Penumbra – light part


Eclipses p 275 lunar
ECLIPSES – p.275http://starchildgsfc.nasa.gov/docs/StarChild/questions/question3.htmlLunar –

  • occurs at Full Moon

  • longer duration

  • safe to look at

  • several types


Total lunar
Total lunarhttp://starchildgsfc.nasa.gov/docs/StarChild/questions/question3.html

  • Moon is completely hidden in Earth’s

    umbra (dark part of the shadow)



Three types of lunar eclipses
Three types of Lunar Eclipses eclipse

  • Penumbral lunar eclipse—the Moon only passes through the penumbra of Earth’s shadow

  • Partial lunar eclipse—part of the Moon passes through the umbra of Earth’s shadow

  • Total lunar eclipse—the entire Moon passes through the umbra of Earth’s shadow

  • websites


Who on Earth will be able to see a lunar eclipse? eclipse

Anyone who can see the Moon (anyone who is on the nighttime side of the Earth during the eclipse)


websites eclipse


Why is the moon red during an eclipse
Why is the Moon red during an eclipse? eclipse

  • The Earth’s atmosphere filters some sunlight and allows it to reach the Moon’s surface

  • Remaining light is red or orange

  • Some of this remaining light is bent or refracted so that a small fraction of it reaches the Moon

  • Exact appearance depends on dust and clouds in the Earth’s atmosphere


Why is a lunar eclipse reddish
Why is a lunar eclipse reddish? eclipse

  • The atmosphere bends different colors of light at different angles…..




Upcoming lunar eclipses
Upcoming Lunar Eclipses eclipse

  • Apr. 25, 2013, Partial eclipse (not visible in US)

  • May 25, 2013, Penumbral eclipse

  • Oct. 18, 2013, Penumbral eclipse

  • Apr 15, 2014, TOTAL ECLIPSE –visible here

  • websites


Penumbral
Penumbral eclipse

  • Moon is in the penumbra – appears dull reddish-brown


Partial
Partial eclipse

  • Moon is between umbra and penumbra




Solar Eclipses there is not an eclipse every new and full moon – eclipses only occur when the Moon crosses the ecliptic at a “node”

When the Moon’s shadow covers part of the Earth

Only happens at New Moon

Three types: Total, Partial, and Annular

websites


Solar eclipses
Solar Eclipses there is not an eclipse every new and full moon – eclipses only occur when the Moon crosses the ecliptic at a “node”

  • Total solar – occurs at new phase, umbra reaches earth

  • partial eclipseoccurs when the Sun and Moon are not exactly in line and the Moon only partially obscures the Sun

  • There is also a “hybrid eclipse” (we won’t worry about that much detail)

  • websites


Solar eclipses1
Solar eclipses there is not an eclipse every new and full moon – eclipses only occur when the Moon crosses the ecliptic at a “node”

  • NOT SAFE to look at – because of UV rays

  • Maximum duration is 7½ min.


Annular
Annular there is not an eclipse every new and full moon – eclipses only occur when the Moon crosses the ecliptic at a “node”

  • occurs when the Moon is at apogee

  • -- ring-shaped eclipse (annulus means ring)

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DtkoAlwIpWY


Annular solar eclipse
Annular Solar Eclipse there is not an eclipse every new and full moon – eclipses only occur when the Moon crosses the ecliptic at a “node”

  • When the Moon is too far to completely cover the Sun—the umbra doesn’t reach the Earth

  • Sun appears as a donut around the Moon


Photos of an annular eclipse
Photos of an Annular Eclipse there is not an eclipse every new and full moon – eclipses only occur when the Moon crosses the ecliptic at a “node”

http://sunearthday.nasa.gov/2006/multimedia/gal_010.php; photos taken by Fred Espenak


Photo of a total eclipse
Photo of a Total Eclipse there is not an eclipse every new and full moon – eclipses only occur when the Moon crosses the ecliptic at a “node”

http://sunearthday.nasa.gov/2006/multimedia/gal_008.php


Total solar eclipse
Total Solar Eclipse there is not an eclipse every new and full moon – eclipses only occur when the Moon crosses the ecliptic at a “node”

  • Observers in the “umbra” shadow see a total eclipse (safe to view the Sun); can see the corona

  • Those in “penumbra” see a partial eclipse—not safe to look directly at Sun

  • Only lasts a few minutes

  • Path of Totality about 10,000 miles long, only 100 miles wide


Upcoming solar eclipses
Upcoming Solar Eclipses there is not an eclipse every new and full moon – eclipses only occur when the Moon crosses the ecliptic at a “node”

  • May 20, 2012 (annular)—VISIBLE In USA

  • Nov. 13, 2012, total eclipse—not visible in USA

  • May 10, 2013, annular eclipse—not visible in USA

  • Next Total Solar Eclipse in continental USA—August 21, 2017

  • http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/eclipse.html

  • websites


Saros
Saros there is not an eclipse every new and full moon – eclipses only occur when the Moon crosses the ecliptic at a “node”

  • – a “calendar” of eclipses that repeats every 6585.3 days

  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saros_(astronomy)


Websites
websites there is not an eclipse every new and full moon – eclipses only occur when the Moon crosses the ecliptic at a “node”

  • http://www.google.com/search?q=eclipse&hl=en&rls=com.microsoft:en-us:IE-SearchBox&rlz=1I7ADSA_enUS371&prmd=imvnsb&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=vACUUO6UIIizyAHGtYGADw&ved=0CAoQ_AUoAQ&biw=1024&bih=605 – images for eclipses

  • http://www.google.com/search?q=total+lunar+eclipse&hl=en&rls=com.microsoft:en-us:IE-SearchBox&rlz=1I7ADSA_enUS371&tbm=isch&prmd=imvns&source=lnms&sa=X&ei=wgGUUJj7OqWEygGarIE4&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAQ&biw=1024&bih=605 - images for lunar eclipses

  • Go back


ad