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Program for North American Mobility in Higher Education Introducing Process Integration for Environmental Control in Engineering Curricula. Module 4: Environmental Challenges – Pulp & Paper Industry Caroline Gaudreault Created at: École Polytechnique de Montréal & Texas A&M University, 2003.

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Program for north american mobility in higher education introducing process integration for environmental control in eng

Program for North American Mobility in Higher EducationIntroducing Process Integration for Environmental Control in Engineering Curricula

Module 4: Environmental Challenges – Pulp & Paper Industry

Caroline Gaudreault

Created at:

École Polytechnique de Montréal &

Texas A&M University, 2003


Purpose of module x

Purpose of Module X

What is the purpose of this module?

This module is intended to overview the environmental challenges of the pulp & paper industry and, more specifically, the reduction of environmental impacts related with the kraft pulping process.


Structure of the module x

Structure of the Module X

What is the structure of this module?

Module X is divided into 3 “tiers”, each with a specific goal:

  • Tier 1: Basic introduction

  • Tier 2: Case study applications

  • Tier 3: Open-ended problem

    These tiers are intended to be completed in order. Students are quizzed at various points, to measure their degree of understanding, before proceeding.

    Each tier contains a statement of intent at the beginning, and a quiz at the end.


Legend

LEGEND

Go to the web site

Go to next subject

More information on the same subject

Look for the answer to the question


Tier i background information

Tier I:Background Information


Tier i statement of intent

Tier I: Statement of Intent

Tier I: Statement of Intent

The purpose of this module is to provides a general overview of the concepts related to minimum impact manufacturing in the Kraft process, and an introduction to pertinent PI tools.

Tier 1 also includes some selected readings, to help the student acquire a deeper understanding of this subject.


Tier i content

Tier I: Content

Tier I is broken into three sections:

1.1 Introduction to the kraft pulping process, its related environmental impacts and related regulations

1.2 Introduction to minimum impact manufacturing

1.3 Related PI tools

At the end of Tier I, there is a short multiple-

answer quiz


Program for north american mobility in higher education introducing process integration for environmental control in eng

1.1 Introduction to the kraft pulping process and its related environmental impacts and related regulations


General description of the kraft pulping process

General Description of the Kraft Pulping Process

  • The kraft process is a form of chemical pulping. This means that, in order to degrade and dissolve away the lignin and keep most of the cellulose and hemicellulose, the wood chips are cooked with appropriate chemicals in an aqueous solution at elevated temperature and pressure. The main challenge is to form fibers that are practically intact.

  • More specifically, the kraft process involves cooking of the chips using a solution of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and sodium sulfide (Na2S)

  • One major characteristic of the kraft process is that the cooking chemicals are regenerated in a recovery process that will be discussed later.


Advantages and disadvantages of kraft process

Advantages:

High strength pulp

Utilizes proven technology for chemical recovery

Handles with a wide variety of wood species

Tolerates bark in the pulping process

Disadvantages:

Unbleached pulp is characterized by a dark brown color

It is associated malodorous gases (organic sulfides)

Advantages and Disadvantages of Kraft Process


Definitions and nomenclature 1

Definitions and Nomenclature (1)

Pulp

Chips

White liquor:

Liquor containing the active cooking chemicals (NaOH and Na2S) and used to cook chips.

Black liquor:

Residual liquor from cooking containing the reaction products of lignin solubilization. This liquor is concentrated and burnt into a recovery furnace and yields an inorganic smelt of Na2CO3.

Green liquor:

Liquor obtained by dissolving the latter smelt. The green liquor is reacted with CaO in order to convert the Na2CO3 in NaOH and regenerate the white liquor.

Cooking

&

Washing

  • BLACK LIQUOR

  • Alkali lignin

  • Hydrolysis salts

  • Sulphonation products

  • WHITE LIQUOR

  • NAOH

  • NA2S

Evaporation

&

Burning

Causticizing

  • GREEN LIQUOR

  • Na2CO3

  • Na2S

The kraft sodium cycle

(Source:Smook, 1994)


Definitions and nomenclature 2

Definitions and Nomenclature (2)

(Source:Smook, 1994)


Sodium vs calcium cycle

Sodium vs. Calcium Cycle

(Adapted from European Comission IPPC, 2001)


Wood fibers

Wood Fibers

Pulp fibers are manufactured by chemically dissolving those wood components (mainly lignin) that keep wood cells together to form the original wood structure by minimizing the damages to these components.

Chemical Components of Wood

Structure of cellulose

Wood

21% Hardwoods

25% Softwoods

Lignin

Extractive

2-8%

Terpenes

Resin acids (softwood)

Fatty acids

Phenols

Unsaponifiables

Carbohydrates

35% Hardwoods

25% Softwoods

Hemicellulose

Cellulose

45%

Glucose

Mannose

Galactose

Xylose

Arabinnose

Glucose

Source: Smook, 1994


Overview of the kraft process

Overview of the Kraft Process

Chips

Water

Lime

mud

Digester

White liquor

storage

Lime mud

washer

White liquor

clarifier

Weak

Liquor

storage

Lime mud

thickener

Causticizers

Blow tank

Grits

Lime

Washers

Slaker

Lime kiln

Pulp to

bleaching

Green liquor

storage

Weak black

liquor storage

Water

Dregs

Dregs

Dregs

washer

Green liquor

clarifier

Evaporators

Contaminated

condensates

Smelt

Dissolving tank

Strong black

liquor storage

Recovering

furnace

Weak liquor

storage

Source: Smook, 1994


Overview of the kraft process1

Overview of the Kraft Process

Chips

Water

  • The wood is mechanically debarked and cut into chips that are screened prior the chemical treatment.

  • Lignin and some carbohydrate material are dissolved from wood chips during cooking in aqueous solution of alkaline, neutral or acidic components at elevated temperature and pressure.

  • Chips maintain their wood structure during chemical pulping but this latter is so weak that it will break down to individual fiber by modest mechanical action.

Lime

mud

Lime mud

washer

White liquor

clarifier

Digester

White liquor

storage

Weak

Liquor

storage

Lime mud

thickener

Causticizers

Blow tank

Grits

Lime

Washers

Lime kiln

Slaker

Pulp to

bleaching

Green liquor

storage

Weak black

liquor storage

Water

Dregs

Dregs

Dregs

washer

Green liquor

clarifier

Evaporators

Contaminated

condensates

Smelt

Dissolving tank

Strong black

liquor storage

Recovering

furnace

Weak liquor

storage

Source: Smook, 1994


Overview of the kraft process2

Overview of the Kraft Process

Chips

Water

Lime

mud

  • Washing: Spent inorganic and dissolved organic materials are separated from the pulp by multistage counter-current washing system. Spent liquor is sent to the regeneration system.

  • Screening: Solid impurities contained in the washed pulp (mainly incompletely delignified wood and knots) are separated by screening. The rejects are reprocessed.

  • Bleaching: Depending in the intended application, pulp can be bleached. Pulp made by the kraft process is darker than the original wood. Bleaching is the purification process that modify colored substance so they either loose their light absorption ability or they dissolve.

Lime mud

washer

White liquor

clarifier

Digester

White liquor

storage

Weak

Liquor

storage

Lime mud

thickener

Causticizers

Blow tank

Pulp

Grits

Lime

Washers

Lime kiln

Slaker

Bleaching

Green liquor

storage

Weak black

liquor storage

Water

Dregs

Dregs

Green liquor

clarifier

Evaporators

Dregs

washer

Contaminated

condensates

Smelt

Weak liquor

storage

Dissolving tank

Strong black

liquor storage

Recovering

furnace

Source: Smook, 1994


Overview of the kraft process3

Overview of the Kraft Process

Chips

Water

Lime

mud

Digester

White liquor

storage

Lime mud

washer

White liquor

clarifier

Weak

Liquor

storage

Lime mud

thickener

Causticizers

Blow tank

Pulp

Grits

Lime

Washers

Slaker

Lime kiln

Bleaching

Green liquor

storage

Weak black

liquor storage

Water

In order to be used as a fuel, kraft liquor must be evaporated in a multistage evaporation system.

Dregs

Dregs

Green liquor

clarifier

Evaporators

Dregs

washer

Contaminated

condensates

Smelt

Dissolving tank

Strong black

liquor storage

Recovering

furnace

Weak liquor

storage

Source: Smook, 1994


Overview of the kraft process4

Overview of the Kraft Process

Chips

Water

Lime

mud

Digester

White liquor

storage

Lime mud

washer

White liquor

clarifier

Weak

Liquor

storage

Lime mud

thickener

Causticizers

Blow tank

  • The strong black liquor is then burned in a recovery furnace where inorganic substances are converted into regenerable substances.

  • Sodium and sulfur salts are converted to a smelt of Na2S and Na2CO3 and brought to a dissolved tank

Pulp

Grits

Lime

Washers

Lime kiln

Slaker

Bleaching

Green liquor

storage

Weak black

liquor storage

Water

Dregs

Dregs

Green liquor

clarifier

Evaporators

Dregs

washer

Contaminated

condensates

Smelt

Dissolving tank

Strong black

liquor storage

Recovering

furnace

Weak liquor

storage

Source: Smook, 1994


Overview of the kraft process5

Overview of the Kraft Process

Chips

Water

Lime

mud

Digester

White liquor

storage

Lime mud

washer

White liquor

clarifier

Weak

Liquor

storage

Lime mud

thickener

Causticizers

Blow tank

Pulp

Grits

Lime

Washers

Slaker

Lime kiln

Bleaching

Green liquor

storage

Weak black

liquor storage

Water

The smelt is dissolved in weak wash liquor from the recausticizing plant.

Dregs

Dregs

Green liquor

clarifier

Evaporators

Dregs

washer

Contaminated

condensates

Smelt

Dissolving tank

Strong black

liquor storage

Recovering

furnace

Weak liquor

storage

Source: Smook, 1994


Overview of the kraft process6

Overview of the Kraft Process

Chips

Water

Lime

mud

Digester

White liquor

storage

Lime mud

washer

White liquor

clarifier

Weak

Liquor

storage

Lime mud

thickener

Causticizers

Blow tank

Pulp

Grits

Lime

Washers

Slaker

Lime kiln

Bleaching

The green liquor is clarified.

Green liquor

storage

Weak black

liquor storage

Water

Dregs

Dregs

Evaporators

Dregs

washer

Green liquor

clarifier

Contaminated

condensates

Source: Smook, 1994

Smelt

Dissolving tank

Strong black

liquor storage

Recovering

furnace

Weak liquor

storage

Source: Smook, 1994


Overview of the kraft process7

Overview of the Kraft Process

Chips

Water

Lime

mud

Digester

White liquor

storage

Lime mud

washer

White liquor

clarifier

Weak

Liquor

storage

Lime mud

thickener

Causticizers

Blow tank

Pulp

Grits

Lime

Washers

Slaker

Lime kiln

Bleaching

  • The green liquor is causticized with reburned lime to form white liquor:

  • CaO and water are reacted in a slaker to form CaOH, which in turn reacts with Na2CO3in the green liquor to form NaOH and CaCO3.

  • The CaCO3, which is insoluble, is separated by filtering and is washed free from sodium salts.

  • It is then calcinated in a lime kiln to CaO and reused.

  • The regenared white liquor is reused in cooking.

Green liquor

storage

Weak black

liquor storage

Water

Dregs

Dregs

Green liquor

clarifier

Evaporators

Dregs

washer

Contaminated

condensates

Smelt

Recovering

furnace

Weak liquor

storage

Dissolving tank

Strong black

liquor storage

Source: Smook, 1994


Pollutants in the p p industry

Pollutants in the P&P Industry

What is a pollutant?

A pollutant is “a substance that can alter the natural environment” (Springer and al., 2000).

US EPA classification of pollutants

  • Oxygen-demanding substances

  • Disease-causing agents

  • Synthetic organic compounds

  • Plant nutrients

  • Inorganic chemical and mineral substances

  • Sediments

  • Radioactive substances

  • Thermal discharges


Environmental impacts of the kraft process

Environmental Impacts of the Kraft Process

To learn about major environmental impacts of the kraft

process: Click on the yellow then pink boxes!

Wood preparation

Chips

Water

Lime

mud

White liquor

clarifier

Digester

White liquor

storage

Lime mud

washer

Weak

Liquor

storage

Lime mud

thickener

Causticizers

Blow tank

Pulp

Grits

Lime

Washers

Lime kiln

Slaker

Bleaching

Green liquor

storage

Weak black

liquor storage

Water

Dregs

Dregs

Green liquor

clarifier

Evaporators

Dregs

washer

Source: Smook, 1994

Contaminated

condensates

Smelt

Dissolving tank

Strong black

liquor storage

Recovering

furnace

Weak liquor

storage


Wood preparation

Air Pollution:

Transportation of logs, production, screening, transportation and storage of chips as well as debarking activities can result in the emission of particulate matters. That are extremely difficult to measure.

Another type of fugitive emission associated with wood preparation activities is gaseous such as volatile organic compounds (VOC).

Water Pollution:

Water is used for 3 purposes: log conveyance?, log washing and wet debarking.

Wood Preparation

For more information

Return to the flowsheet


Pulp production

Air Pollution:

The cooking process results in formation and releases of VOC’s and reduced components (TRS) that are odorous.

These compounds can exit the digester either in gaseous or liquid form. The gas are sent to condensers to remove water and other condensable compounds.

The non-condensable gas are incinerated in order to eliminate the odorous ones.

The remainder are condensed and used to pre-heat the chips.

Water Pollution:

Wood chips are cooked in aqueous solution.

Pulp Production

For more information

Return to the flowsheet


Pulp washing screening and deknotting

Air Pollution:

The pulp washing, screening and deknotting do not result in new pollutant but volatile compounds contained in the pulp can escape during those operations.

Water Pollution:

Pulp is washed to remove pulping chemicals and soluble wood components and diluted with water.

Pulp Washing, Screening and Deknotting

For more information

Return to the flowsheet


Bleaching oxygen delignification od air pollution

Bleaching: Oxygen Delignification (OD) – Air Pollution

In OD, steam, caustic (as oxidized white liquor), and oxygen are added to the pulp in order to reduce the lignin content before further bleaching. VOC’s are present in the incoming pulp, white liquor and washer shower water and can be released.

CO2 and CO are formed in the reactor during the delignification.


Bleaching air pollution

Bleaching – Air Pollution

Bleaching occurs in a multistep process involving the use of chemicals that will oxidize and dissolve the lignin. Following this process, the cellulose and the hemicellulose will be separated from the undesirable material. This process also involves chemical utilization.

Traditionally, chlorine was used in the first stage of bleaching but it was replaced by ClO2 because of the possible formation of unwanted chlorine compounds. Use of sodium hypochlorite in the third stage has also mostly been discontinued because of concerns related with chloroform and AOX formation.

Exhausts gases from bleaching will contain VOC’s, unreacted bleaching chemical, and inadvertently formed compounds. Most VOC’s are returned to the unbleached pulp slurry. It is also possible that ClO2 and Cl are present in small amounts in the bleach plant gases.

CO is mostly formed in the first stage of bleaching.


Bleaching water pollution

Bleaching – Water Pollution

Different chemicals are used in a multi-stage process to bleach the pulp. Aqueous washing is performed between stages to remove bleaching chemicals and any dissolved wood components extracted during bleaching.

Water is also used to prepare bleaching chemical solutions and in air emission control scrubbers.

Because waste water from bleaching usually has a high content in content in chlorine, it is incompatible with chemical recovery process and it is sent directly to the wastewater treatment.

For more information

Return to the flowsheet


Chemical recovery evaporation

Water Pollution:

Water from weak black liquor is evaporated and the condensates from the evaporators comprise the excess water from liquor concentration. These condensates can be reused in other processes but excess condensates are discharged to the wastewater treatment.

The condensates can contain high level of TRS, methanol and acetone.

Chemical Recovery:Evaporation

Air Pollution:

Following the cooking, the spent cooking liquor referred to as weak black liquor. This liquor is composed of around 85% water and 15% solids that are a complex mixture of sulfur and sodium containing organic and inorganic compounds.

During the evaporation of water, gaseous volatile compounds can be formed. Also, because of the presence of sodium sulfide in Kraft cooking liquor, TRS compounds can be released during the evaporation. To avoid bad odors, these gas are sent to combustion in order to oxidize the TRS.

For more information

Return to the flowsheet


Chemical recovery recovery furnace air pollution

Chemical Recovery:Recovery Furnace – Air Pollution

When the liquor has a minimum of 60% solids, it is sent in the recovery furnace where the organic compounds are burnt and the inorganic compounds transformed in a molten smelt.

The recovery furnace is the recovery furnace is the predominant source of TRS emissions.

Particulates such as sodium sulfate and sodium carbonate are also emitted by the recovery furnace. Potassium compounds and other metals can be present in smaller quantities.

Recovery furnaces also emit SO2, NOx, CO, volatile organic compounds and other products from incomplete combustion. There is also a potential for SO3, H2SO4, HCL and NH3 emissions.

There are possibilities for other chlorinated compounds emissions but in very small quantities.

Return to the flowsheet


Chemical recovery dissolving and clarification air pollution

Chemical Recovery:Dissolving and Clarification – Air Pollution

Molten smelt drains from the furnace to a tank and the smelt is broken up with steam. The smelt particles fall into an agitated solution of weak wash. The mixture is called green liquor that is pumped to the clarifier where suspended solids are removed.

Most of the emissions from the dissolving tank are TRS and particulate matter that are similar to the ones from the recovery furnace.

VOC and NH3 can also be released.

Return to the flowsheet


Chemical recovery lime kiln

Air Pollution:

Lime mud is calcinated to form CaO and CO2 in the lime kiln.

Most of the emissions from the lime kiln are TRS and particulate matter.

SO2 emissions are low because of the alkaline atmosphere in the lime kiln.

Lime kiln can also emit NOx, CO and VOC from incomplete combustion.

Water Pollution

Water is used to wash the solid precipitates formed in the recovery cycle. Washing recovers sodium and sulfur containing from green liquor dregs and lime mud. This weak wash is reused to dissolve recovery furnace and the excess is sent to the wastewater treatment.

Chemical Recovery:Lime Kiln

For more information

Return to the flowsheet


Chemical recovery slaker air pollution

Chemical Recovery:Slaker – Air Pollution

CaO from the kiln and green liquor from the dissolving tank are mixed together to give NaOH, CaCO3. A large amount of steam that must be ventiled is formed.

The steam contains a lot a particulate matter that are mostly calcium and sodium carbonates and sulfates.

NH3 can also be formed.

Return to the flowsheet


Chemical recovery other causticizing area equipment

Chemical RecoveryOther Causticizing Area Equipment

Air Pollution:

Other equipment associated with the processing of green liquor (clarifiers, storage, surge tanks and dregs washers), white liquor (causticizers tanks, clarifiers, pressure filters and storage tanks), and lime mud (mix tanks, dilution tanks, storage tanks, pressure filters and pumps) can vent to the atmosphere.

However, gas flow rates such as VOC and NH3 from this equipment are usually very small and concentrations low.

Return to the flowsheet


Representative bleached kraft mill water loads

Representative Bleached Kraft Mill Water Loads

  • The highest volume of discharges comes from the paper mill.

  • The largest BOD loads occur at the bleach plant.

  • The paper mill process the highest amount of TSS.

Return to Lime Killn

Return to Evaporation

Return to Bleaching

Return to Pulp Washing

Return to Pulp Production

Return to Wood Preparation

(Source: Springer and al., 1997)


Most impacting environmental regulations

Most Impacting Environmental Regulations

  • Legislation is one of the drivers for implementing environmental changes and it is also recognized as a important factor to conserve an advantage over competitors.

  • Also, there is a consensus that legislations will be more and more stringent over the next 25 years.

  • For this reason, the regulations that have the most significant impact on the pulp and paper industry will be described in the following slides.

  • The importance of legislation as well as of other drivers for environmental change will be described in tier II.


Us epa clean water act

US EPA Clean Water Act

  • The Clean Water Act launched in 1977 established the basic structure for regulating discharges of pollutants into the waters of the United States. By this, the USEPA has the authority to implement pollution control programs (e.g. setting wastewater standards for industry).

  • It aims at reducing direct pollutant discharges into waterways, finance municipal wastewater treatment facilities, and manage polluted runoff using regulatory and non-regulatory tools.


Us epa cluster rule

US EPA Cluster Rule

  • The US EPA Cluster Rule integrates air and water regulations.

  • It was first published in 1998 and was applying to bleached paper grade kraft, soda and paper grade sulfite mills.

  • Key features of the Cluster Rule are:

    • Implementation within 3 years;

    • Bleach plant eflluent limitations for dioxin, chlorinated phenolics, and chloroform;

    • AOX limitations;

    • Establishment of best management practices (BMP) for control of spills of spent pulping liquor, turpentine and soap;

    • Encouragement of project XL;

    • No Change on BOD and TSS limits;

    • No limits on color, methylene chloride, or methy ethyl ketone;

    • No current COD limitations, but it changes in the future.


Us epa project xl

US EPA Project XL

Project XL stands for "eXcellence and Leadership” and is a US pilot program that allows state and local governments, businesses and federal facilities to develop with EPA innovative strategies to test better or more cost-effective ways of achieving environmental and public health protection. Project XL has 8 selection criteria:

  • Produce superior environmental results beyond those that would have been achieved under current and reasonably anticipated future regulations or policies;

  • Produce benefits such as cost savings, paperwork reduction, regulatory flexibility or other types of flexibility that serve as an incentive to both project sponsors and regulators;

  • Supported by stakeholders;

  • Achieve innovation/pollution prevention;

  • Produce lessons or data that are transferable to other facilities;

  • Demonstrate feasibility;

  • Establish accountability through agreed upon methods of monitoring, reporting, and evaluations; and

  • Avoid shifting the risk burden, i.e., do not create worker safety or environmental justice problems as a result of the experiment.

    In addition, projects must present economic opportunities and incorporate community planning.


Industrial depollution attestations quebec

Industrial Depollution Attestations (Quebec)

Program for Industrial Waste Reduction:

The Program for waste reduction was launched in 1988. Quebec Ministry of Environment has developed an intervention strategy integrating all receiving medias. The target industrials sectors were those whom contaminant rejects, more specifically releases of toxic substances had the largest impacts on local environments.

Industrial Depollution Attestations:

The Industrial Depollution Attestation is the legal tool that allows the ministry to operationalyze the Program for Waste Reduction.


Industrial depollution attestations quebec1

Industrial Depollution Attestations (Quebec)

  • The Industrial Depollution Attestation is a permit, renewable every 5 years, that establishes the environmental conditions under which the industry must operate.

  • The Industrial Depollution Attestation main components are:

    • Reject standards to respect;

    • Requirements related to rejects follow-up;

    • Other operation conditions as determined by the ministry;

    • Studies to perform;

    • Due dates and additional requirements.

  • Targeted Sectors:

    • Pulp and Paper (is the only one to have completely implemented the program to date);

    • Mines and Metallurgy;

    • Organic and Inorganic Chemistry;

    • Agri-food industry, wood transformation and textiles.


Integrated pollution prevention and control ippc europe

Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control (IPPC) - Europe

What is the IPPC:The IPPC is a European set of common rules on permitting for industrial installations. The aims of the IPPC Directive is to minimize pollution from various point sources throughout the European Union. Permits, based on the concept of Best Available Techniques (or BAT), are necessary to certain industry to be able to operate.


Kyoto protocol and ghg mitigations

Kyoto Protocol and GHG Mitigations

Climate change is a problem which affects all countries. Many human activities emit greenhouse gases (GHGs) to the atmosphere ( heating and cooling buildings, using energy,transportation, industrial processes, etc.). When in contact with the sun radiations, the GHGs act like a greenhouse's glass to block this heat from escaping back to space increasing the earth temperature.

In1997, more than 160 countries met in Kyoto (Japan), and agreed to targets to reduce GHG emissions. This agreement is called the Kyoto Protocol. Canada's target is to reduce its GHG emissions to 6 percent below 1990 levels by the period between 2008 and 2012.

The Protocol will only become legally binding when it is ratified by at least 55 countries, covering at least 55 per cent of the emissions addressed by the Protocol. Neither USA or Mexico have ratified the protocol. At this time (May 2004) the implementation is pending ratification by either USA or Russia.


Ghg mitigations pulp and paper

GHG Mitigations & Pulp and Paper

In 2003, the Forest Products Association of Canada has sign an agreement with the Canadian government concerning the GHG emissions which includes a commitment by the industry to reduce its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions intensity by an average of 15 percent by 2008 to 2012, the first Kyoto commitment period.


References

References

  • ENVIRONNEMENT QUÉBEC. 2003. Le Programme de réduction des rejets industriels et l’attestation d’assainissement.http://www.menv.gouv.qc.ca/programmes/prri/index.htm(page consulted in 2004)

  • EUROPEAN COMISSION. Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control (IPPC) – Reference Document on Best Available Techniques in the Pulp and Paper Industry. 2001, 475 p.

  • Gullichsen, J. Fogelholm, C-J. (eds). Papermaking Science and Technology, Chemical Pulping, Book 6A. Tappi Press, Helsinki, Finland, 2000, 693 p.

  • SMOOK, G.A. Handbook for pulp & paper technologists. 2nd ed. Angus Wilde Publications, Vancouver, Canada, 1992, 419 p.

  • SPRINGER, Allan M. (ed.) Industrial Environmental Control – Pulp and Paper Industry. 3rd ed. Tappi Press, Atlanta, USA, 2000, 711 p.

  • USEPA. 2003. Project XL. http://www.epa.gov/ProjectXL/ (page consulted in 2004)

  • USEPA. 2003. Industrial Water Pollution Controls.http://www.epa.gov/OST/pulppaper/cluster.html (page consulted in 2004).


1 2 introduction to minimum impact manufacturing mim

1.2 Introduction to minimum impact manufacturing (MIM)


Content

Content

  • MIM concepts

  • Progressive water system closure and build-up of NPE’s

  • Zero discharge concepts

  • Tracking models for water, NPE’s, and targeted species

  • Kraft mill energy efficiency

  • Relation between minimum energy and minimum effluent

  • BAT concepts

  • Example of application of MIM concept


Content1

Content

  • MIM concepts

  • Zero discharge concepts

  • Progressive water system closure and build-up of NPE’s

  • Tracking models for water, NPE’s, and targeted species

  • Kraft mill energy efficiency

  • Relation between minimum energy and minimum effluent

  • BAT concepts

  • Example of application of MIM concept


Weyerhaeuser s vision of mim

Weyerhaeuser’s Vision of MIM

Minimum impact manufacturing (MIM) concept has first been introduced by Weyerhaeuser:

“Using a Minimum Impact Manufacturing strategy, Weyerhaeuser directs its efforts to manufacturing quality products with minimal environmental impact and maximum return to shareholders. The strategy works to prevent pollution by continuously reducing process byproducts and finding ways to capture, reuse or recycle them.”

(Weyerhaeuser website, 2004)


Weyerhaeuser s vision of mim1

Weyerhaeuser’s Vision of MIM

For a production facility MIM includes Weyerhaeuser's commitment to strive to close the loop by further:

  • Optimizing raw materials used at the mill level

  • Reducing water usage

  • Minimizing fossil fuel for energy in manufacturing

  • Reducing/eliminating hazardous waste

  • Generating less solid waste

  • Reducing emissions to all media

  • Eliminating spills

  • Reusing and recycling from our mills the materials and residuals

    that previously went to landfills

  • Collecting and recycling used waste paper for use as a raw

    material

    (Weyerhaeuser website, 2004)


Goals of mim

Goals of MIM

Minimum Impact Manufacturing aims to:

  • Eliminate process issues before they become environmental problems.

  • Address multiple environmental areas, including air and water quality, solid and hazardous waste minimization and more.

  • Use science and economics to focus on pollution prevention at the source rather than end-of-pipe remedies.

    (Weyerhaeuser website, 2004)


Environmental hiearchy of needs

Environmental Hiearchy of Needs

Completion of the

Forest products cycle

Minimum

Impact

Energy, odor, color,

biodiversity, etc.

Chronic toxicity,

bioaccumulation,

etc.

Subtle, Complex, Aesthetic

Chronic and/or Long-Term Effects

Resource depletion

acute toxicity,

raw effluent,

etc.

Acute Impacts on the environment

Source: Erickson, Zacher and Decrease, 1996


Key environmental parameter related to mim

Key Environmental Parameter Related to MIM


Content2

Content

  • MIM concepts

  • Zero discharge concepts

  • Progressive water system closure and build-up of NPE’s

  • Tracking models for water, NPE’s, and targeted species

  • Kraft mill energy efficiency

  • Relation between minimum energy and minimum effluent

  • BAT concepts

  • Example of application of MIM concept


Goal of process closure

Goal of Process Closure

The goal of process closure with respect to effluent discharges is to minimize the amount of waste generated. This can be accomplished by:

  • Using more efficient processes;

  • Using processes that do not require water;

  • Recovering the waste materials.

    (Source, NCASI, 2003)


Rapson reeve process

Rapson-Reeve Process

  • In 1967 Rapson proposed a bleached kraft pulp manufacturing process that had the potential to greatly reduce, if not eliminate, effluent discharges.

  • The idea was based on a collection of technologies, including incresed use of chlorine dioxide for bleaching and a process for generating this chemical that could be fully integrated with the chemical requirements of the kraft pulping and bleaching processes.

  • The driver for this process was a cost effective alternative to the biological effluent treatment.

  • The process was implemented by the Great Lakes Paper mill in Thunder Bay, but abandoned.


Rapson reeve process1

Rapson-Reeve Process

The original effluent-free mill concept was based on the following ideas:

  • Replace 70-80% of the chlorine in the chlorination stage with an equivalent amount of chlorine dioxide.

  • Use a new chlorine dioxide generating process.

  • Use countercurrent washing in bleach plant, using wastewater from the wet end of the pulp dryer or paper machine to minimize de volume of filtrate to be recovered.

  • Use a portion of the bleaching filtrate to wash the unbleached filtrate, allowing the dissolved from bleaching to be recovered via evaporation and burning.

  • Use the remainder of the bleaching filtrate to wash the lime mud and green liquor dregs and to dissolve the smelt from the recovery furnace.


Rapson reeve process2

Rapson Reeve Process

Effluent-free concept (Cont’d):

  • Treat the evaporator condensates with a small amount of chlorine dioxide to oxidize the foul-smelling compounds and use the oxidized condensates in place of fresh water on the wet end of the pulp dryer or paper machine.

  • Remove the sodium chloride from the liquor cycle by extracting it from the recovery furnace flue gas in the electrostatic precipitator. A portion of the extract would be used to generate chlorine dioxide for the bleach plant and the remainder would be discarded.

  • Establish closed water systems for wood debarking, pulp screening, and cleaning.


Main problems in making a mill effluent free

Main Problems in Making a Mill Effluent-Free

  • Non-process elements can accumulate.

  • Pulp quality can be affected.

  • About one quarter of the water pollution in bleached pulp mills comes from spills and wash-up and are not well controlled.

  • Calcium trap: when there is any acid stage in the bleaching sequence (ozone), calcium carbonate will travel with the pulp in neutral or alkaline stages, but dissolve in acid stages. If countercurrent washing is used, the calcium will be precipitated into the pulp in any previous alkaline stage and carried forward to be re-dissolved in acid stage.

  • In order to obtain the appropriated displacement ratio and purge for each stage, the flow of filtrate in and out must be precisely balanced.

  • In order to minimize the consumption of oxidizing agent in subsequent stages throught incomplete washing, the concentration of organic matter in each filtrate must be carefully controlled.


Process closure technologies

Process Closure Technologies

Definition:

Process closure technologies can be defined as those which effect or enable the reduction of waterborne wastes from pulp manufacturing facilities. They serve to divert wood components and other raw materials from liquid waste streams by prevention, reuse, or recovery.

These technologies were largely driven by the desire to limit the discharge of chlorinated organic compounds.


Zero discharge concept

Zero Discharge Concept

  • For a majority of pulp mills zero-effluent discharge is impracticable.

  • Currently, zero effluent operation appears to be restricted to plants producing bleached chemical thermal mechanical pulp and non-chlorine bleaching agents.

  • Since the bleach plant is the major source of contaminated effluent in a kraft pulp mill, the closure of these circuits is an essential prerequisite for producing a zero-effluent kraft mill.

  • This requires the simultaneous resolution of a number of problems:

    • water balance, chemicals balance, corrosion, precipitation of salts and removal of non-product substances.


Low effluent kraft mill examples newest mills of america

Low Effluent Kraft Mill ExamplesNewest Mills of America

The 3 newest mills of America were designed to be highly economical and environmentally performing using high capacity, single line facilities, and employing modern technology for pulp production and effluent treatment. None of these mills practices recovery of bleaching wastewaters but their effluent quality is among the best in the world. These mills are:

  • Bahia Sul, Brazil;

  • Alabama Pine Pulp, USA;

  • Alberta-Pacific, Canada.


Low effluent kraft mill examples mill practicing recovery of bleaching filtrates

Low Effluent Kraft Mill ExamplesMill Practicing Recovery of Bleaching Filtrates

Linerboard mills:

  • AssiDomän Frövi, Swenden;

  • Kappa Kraftliner (formerly AssiDomän) Piteå, Sweden;

  • SCA Munksund, Sweden.


Low effluent kraft mill examples mill practicing recovery of bleaching filtrates1

Low Effluent Kraft Mill ExamplesMill Practicing Recovery of Bleaching Filtrates

Bleached papergrade kraft mills:

  • Blue Ridge Paper Products – Canton, North Carolina, U.S.A.

  • International Paper Company – Franklin, Virginia, U.S.A.

  • Aspa Bruk – Smurfit Munksjö, Sweden

  • M-Real Sverige AB – Husum, Sweden

  • SCA Pulp AB – Östrand, Sweden

  • Södra Cell – Mörrum, Sweden

  • Södra Cell – Värö Bruk, Sweden

  • Stora Enso – Skoghall, Sweden

  • Metsä-Botnia – Rauma, Finland

  • UPM-Kymmene Wisaforest – Pietarsaari, Finland


Content3

Content

  • MIM concepts

  • Zero discharge concepts

  • Progressive water system closure and build-up of NPE’s

  • Tracking models for water, NPE’s, and targeted species

  • Kraft mill energy efficiency

  • Relation between minimum energy and minimum effluent

  • BAT concepts

  • Example of application of MIM concept


Progressive water system closure

Progressive Water System Closure

Conventional methods to achieve water closure are simple and include:

  • Using counter-current washing in pulping and bleaching operations;

  • Closing brownstock screen room;

  • Using dry debarking;

  • Using evaporator condensate for brownstock washing;

  • Recycling excess whitewater from paper machine to bleach plant;

  • Reusing stripped condensates from steam stripping of foul condensates;

  • Using equipment and process that require less water;

  • Using cooling towers for vacuum pump seal water an non-contact cooling water;

  • Using first bleach stage washer/filtrate to dilute brown high-density stock;

  • Recycle/reuse secondary and/or tertiary treated effluent;

    Applicating changes to pulping and bleaching practices will further strive to the closure.


Non process elements npes

Non Process Elements (NPEs)

  • NPEs are materials such as potassium (K), phosphorus (P), manganese (Mn), magnesium (Mg), iron (Fe), aluminium (Al), silicon (Si), calcium (Ca), barium (Ba), and chlorine (Cl) that enter the chemical pulping process with the wood, water and chemicals.

  • When we decrease fresh water consumption, there is a potential for increasing the concentration of some troublesome substances and more specifically NPEs.


Npes consequences

NPEs Consequences

  • NPEs accumulate in the sodium and calcium cycle in kraft process potentially causing the following consequences:

    • Corrosion of the recovery boiler and other equipment;

    • Deposits on the boiler tubes that reduce heat transfer;

    • Scale in the digester, evaporators, and heat exchangers;

    • Blinding of white liquor and lime mud filters;

    • Reduced reburned lime reactivity;

    • Ring formation in the lime kiln;

    • Increased dust formation in the lime kiln;

    • Increased chemical consumption in bleaching;

    • Reduced effectiveness of ozone and peroxide bleaching.


Npes classification

NPEs Classification

There are to catogories of NPEs:

  • NPEs that form insoluble metal hydroxides or carbonates and are removed from the sodium cycle with the dregs and grits: mostly Ca, Mg, Mn and Si.

  • NPEs that form soluble compounds in alkaline solution: mostly Al, Cl, and K.


Build up of npes

Build-up of NPEs

  • In an « open » mill the presence of NPEs is not importance since they are purged outside the system.

  • When progressively closing mill, many outlets are not available anymore. The consequence of this is the build-up of NPEs.

  • NPEs have a tendency to accumulate in eighter the sodium or calcium cycle in the following way:

    Sodium Cycle: K > Cl > Al > Fe > Si > Mn > Mg > Ca

    Calcium Cycle: Mg > Al > Fe > Mn > Si > Na > K > S > Cl

  • The most troublesome NPEs are K, Cl and Na. Na is the most tricky because it is a process and non-process element at the same time.


Content4

Content

  • MIM concepts

  • Progressive water system closure and build-up of NPE’s

  • Zero discharge concepts

  • Tracking models for water, NPE’s, and targeted species

  • Kraft mill energy efficiency

  • Relation between minimum energy and minimum effluent

  • BAT concepts

  • Example of application of MIM concept


Tracking models for water npe s and targeted species

Tracking Models for Water, NPE’s, and Targeted Species

Path diagram equation:

It is a mass integration tool whose objective is to track targeted species (e.g., NPEs and water) as they propagate throughout the process and provides the right level of details to be incorporated into a mass integration analysis.

A typical form of the path equations is to describe outlet flows and compositions from each critical unit as a function of inlet flow, inlet compositions, and appropriate design and operating parameters.

Steps for analysis will be described in the following slides.


Main characteristic of the path diagram equation

Main Characteristic of the Path Diagram Equation

In order to optimize water allocation in a pulping process, two important activities can be used together: mass integration and process simulation. Mass integration techniques handle process objectives, data, requirements and constraints. It will allow to fix performance targets, solution strategies, and proposed changes to the process.

Because of these changes, the performance must be reassessed using process analysis or simulation. The use of process simulation enables the update of flowrates and compositions throughout the process

Learn more about

simulation

Learn more about

Mass integration

(Source: Lovelady, 2001)


Degrees of freedom

NV = NS x NC

F= NV - NE = NC (NS - 1)

F: degrees of freedom

NV: number of variables

NE: number of equations

NC: number of targeted species

NS: number of outlet streams

Assumptions:

All inlets to a unit are known and it is desired to determine the outputs of the unit.

F must provided as additional modeling equations, assumptions, measurements, or data in order to have an appropriately specified (determined) set of equations that is solvable.

Outlet streams

Nstreams out

Inlet stream

(Fresh inputs or outlets from other units)

Unit U

Degrees of Freedom


Mixer splitter model

Mixer-Splitter Model

  • The mixer-splitter model is a modeling technique which relies on nominal data .

  • The nominal data are those for the plant prior to any changes and can be obtained via simulation, fundamental modeling, direct measurements, or literature data.

  • There are various of the mixer splitter model:

    • Fixed split model;

    • Flow ratio model ;

    • Species ratio model.

  • Based on the knowledge of the process, choices can be made for the selected model and streams/species.

  • Path equations can be developed for water and targeted NPEs throughout the process.


Fixed split models

Fixed Split Models

  • The fixed split model adopts a certain split for the flows of the various streams leaving the unit.

  • This model is useful in predicting flows out of many units, particularly separators.

αF

F

Fixed Split

Model

(1-α)F


Flow ratio model

Flow Ratio Model

  • The ratio model, relates certain streams or components via fixed ratios.

  • The flow ratio model assumes that inlet and outlet flows of certain streams maintain a certain ratio.

F

Flow Ratio

Model

G

G2 = G1 x F2

F1


Species ratio model

Species Ratio Model

  • The species ratio model is another form of the ratio model.

  • It assumes relationship between certain species within the same stream via fixed ratios.

  • This is particularly useful when one component can be accurately tracked while another one cannot.

Specy A = α

Specy B = β

F

Flow Ratio

Model

B2 = A2 x (β/α )


Content5

Content

  • MIM concepts

  • Progressive water system closure and build-up of NPE’s

  • Zero discharge concepts

  • Tracking models for water, NPE’s, and targeted species

  • Kraft mill energy efficiency

  • Relation between minimum energy and minimum effluent

  • BAT concepts

  • Example of application of MIM concept


Energy in kraft mill

Energy in Kraft Mill

  • Kraft mills are usually partly energy sufficient:

    • They generate power using sources such as wood wastes and spent pulping liquor.

    • This is very important since CO2 emissions from renewable sources are not included in the greenhouse gases inventory considered under the Kyoto protocol.

    • The emergence of new technologies will allow the kraft mill to be essentially energy-sufficient in the future.


Kraft mill energy efficiency

Kraft Mill Energy Efficiency

To maximize operating profit a mill requires the following technologies:

  • Since black liquor is the largest source of energy in a kraft mill, it is important to use it in an efficient way. A higher solids content will result in more steam produced and less heat going to recovery stack as water vapor.

  • Pulping yield must be increased using new cooking technologies with reduced energy consumption.

  • Washing and screening must be runned at higher consistencies and their performance must be increased in order to reduce the water necessary to wash the pulp.

  • For improved steam economies and evaporation to high solids levels with scaling, modern evaporators with heat treatment can be used.


Kraft mill energy efficiency1

Kraft Mill Energy Efficiency

To maximize operating profit a mill requires the following technologies:

  • New kiln technology with large precoat filters, flash dryers, product coolers and better insulating brick will reduce lost of heat.

  • Screening and conditioning of chips will reduce fines generation and improve digester yield.

  • Others:

    • Economies of scale are important in terms of energy consumption;

    • Using less water will generally reduce heating requirements;

    • Efficient mill layout will reduce friction loss associated with long piping;

    • Etc.


Content6

Content

  • MIM concepts

  • Progressive water system closure and build-up of NPE’s

  • Zero discharge concepts

  • Tracking models for water, NPE’s, and targeted species

  • Kraft mill energy efficiency

  • Relation between minimum energy and minimum effluent

  • BAT concepts

  • Example of application of MIM concept


Effect of water closure on energy

Effect of Water Closure on Energy

  • Effect of reducing water usage on energy flows are strong and complex.

  • This leads to complex process designs and an increasing need for systematic and system-oriented analysis of energy and water use in the mills.

  • On of the challenge is to deal with excess heat that increases the temperature of process streams and effluent.

  • Process integration can be an useful tool to understand this can of problems.


Content7

Content

  • MIM concepts

  • Progressive water system closure and build-up of NPE’s

  • Zero discharge concepts

  • Tracking models for water, NPE’s, and targeted species

  • Kraft mill energy efficiency

  • Relation between minimum energy and minimum effluent

  • BAT concepts

  • Example of application of MIM concept


Bat concept source european ippc

BAT Concept(Source: European IPPC)

BAT: Best Available Technology economically achievable

Key characteristics of BATs:

  • There is no single reference of best available techniques in pulp and paper industry. In contrast, the list of techniques to consider in the determination of BAT provides a lot of different options of an overall BAT for given mills, which may be combined in different ways.

  • The BAT-concept is process-related because the environmental impact is caused on this level i.e. by different manufacturing processes as for instance cooking, bleaching, de-inking, coating etc. The single processes, the raw materials used and the product properties to be achieved determine the emission of a mill. That means when approaching the pulp and paper industry different types of raw materials used and processes involved have to be distinguished.


Bat concept source european ippc1

BAT Concept(Source: European IPPC)

Key characteristics of BATs (Cont’d):

  • As pulp and paper products are highly diverse and utilized processes even for one and the same product may vary greatly, many factors of production technology must be taken into account to guarantee a high level of environmental protection. For the pulp and paper industry the best available techniques cannot be defined solely by describing unit processes. Instead, the whole installations must be examined and dealt with as entities. BAT in pulp and paper industry is linked to the environmental performance of mills.

  • There are different options for suitable combinations of processes depending - besides other things - on the product properties to be achieved. As a consequence, the process-oriented approach has to be extended by a product-oriented concept i.e. the BAT approach must be linked to the environmental performance of specific types of mills where specific products are manufactured. Thus, in this document best available techniques are presented for major mill classes separately.


Bat remark

BAT - Remark

The following programs are based on BAT:

  • USEPA Cluster Rules;

  • European IPPC.


Content8

Content

  • MIM concepts

  • Progressive water system closure and build-up of NPE’s

  • Zero discharge concepts

  • Tracking models for water, NPE’s, and targeted species

  • Kraft mill energy efficiency

  • Relation between minimum energy and minimum effluent

  • BAT concepts

  • Example of application of MIM concept


Application of mim concepts the flint river case study

Application of MIM Concepts:The Flint River Case Study

Description of the mill

  • Flint River is a Kraft pulp mill located in Georgia, USA.

  • It is producing 320 000 tons per year of fluff pulp.

  • Flint River Operations' environmental performance has been recognized as superior within the bleached Kraft pulping industry.

  • Flint River was the first bleached Kraft pulp mill to employ commercially viable advanced technologies that minimize adverse impacts to the environment such as oxygen delignification, 100% chlorine dioxide substitution and bleaching and extensive water conservation practices.


Application of mim concepts the flint river case study1

Application of MIM Concepts:The Flint River Case Study

Weyerhaeuser Project XL:

Weyerhaeuser Company's pulp manufacturing facility in Oglethorpe, Georgia, is striving to minimize the environmental impact of its manufacturing processes on the Flint River and surrounding environment by pursuing a long-term vision of a Minimum (environmental) Impact Mill. Weyerhaeuser Company is taking immediate steps by decreasing water use and meeting or exceeding all regulatory targets. EPA and the State of Georgia have agreed to propose changes in the rules to support minimum impact manufacturing. The Final Project Agreement was signed on January 17, 1997.


Application of mim concepts the flint river case study2

Application of MIM Concepts:The Flint River Case Study

MIM phases at Flint River

  • MIM Phase I(1979-1980)

    • Original Facility Design

      • Oxygen Delignification

      • Extensive Water Recycle / Reuse

      • Chlorine/Chlorine Dioxide Bleaching

      • Air Emissions / Low Odor / BACT/ NSPS

      • Extensive Wastewater Treatment

  • MIM Phase II(1981-1985)

    • River & Lake Environmental Studies

    • Holding Pond Addition / Delta Color Management

    • Process Reliability I (Rate/Surge)

    • Spill Containment & Liquor Best Management Practices


Application of mim concepts the flint river case study3

Application of MIM Concepts:The Flint River Case Study

MIM phases at Flint River

  • MIM Phase III(1986-1995)

    • Process Reliability II (Statistical Process Control)

    • Elimination Of Molecular Chlorine

    • Bleach Plant & Chemical Generator Collection

    • Emergency Response Team (Fire/Hazmat/EMT/Confined Space)

    • ISO 9000 Certification

  • MIM Phase IV(1996-1997)

    • Isothermal Cooking

    • Odor Control System Upgrade

    • Energy Steam Reductions

    • ISO 14001 Environmental Management System (EMS)


Application of mim concepts the flint river case study4

Application of MIM Concepts:The Flint River Case Study

MIM phases at Flint River

  • MIM Phase V

    • Bleach Plant Effluent Reductions

    • Solid Waste Reductions

    • Timberland Resource Strategies

    • Water Use Reduction

    • Energy Conservation

    • Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP) Emission Reductions

      MIM Phase VI:

    • Life Cycle Inventory


References1

References

  • EUROPEAN COMISSION. Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control (IPPC) – Reference Document on Best Available Techniques in the Pulp and Paper Industry. 2001, 475 p.

  • LOVELADY, EVA M. An Integrated Approach to the Optimization of Water Usage and Discharge in Pulp and Paper Plants. Auburn University, USA, 2002, 185 p.

  • Minimum Impact Manufacturing. 1996 International Environmental Conference & Exhibits. 1996, p.623-628.

  • NCASI. Pulp Mill Process Closure: A Review of Global Technology Developments and Mill Experiences in the 1990s. Technical Bulletin No. 860, May 2003, 108 p.

  • PAPRICAN. Energy cost reduction in the pulp and paper industry. Pointe Claire, QC, Canada : Pulp and Paper Research Institute of Canada, 1999.

  • USEPA. Project XL – Weyerhaeuser Company. http://www.epa.gov/projectxl/weyer/index.htm (page consulted in 2004).

  • WEYERHAEUSER. 2001. Minimum Impact Manufacturing. http://www.weyerhaeuser.com/environment/reducingpollution/minimumimpactmfg.asp (page consulted in 2004)


1 3 related pi tools

1.3 Related PI Tools


Content9

Content

  • Process Simulation

  • Process Integration

  • Mass Integration

  • Energy Integration

  • LCA

  • Integrating these tools to address MIM


Content10

Content

  • Process Simulation

  • Mass Integration

  • Energy Integration

  • LCA

  • Integrating these tools to address MIM


What is a model a simulation

What is a Model? A Simulation?

  • A model is an abstraction of a process operation used to build, change, improve or control that process.

  • Models are useful for:

    • Equipment design, sizing, selection

    • Comparison of possible configurations

    • Evaluation of process performance against limits (e.g. concentrations, effluent discharge rates, …)

    • Debottlenecking and optimization

    • Control strategy development and evaluation

  • Simulation involves performing a series of experiments with a process model.

Return to Path

Diagram Equation


Benefits of simulation

Benefits of Simulation

  • Better understanding of the process

  • Consistent set of typical mill data

  • Objective comparative evaluation of options for ROI etc.

  • Identification of bottlenecks, instabilities etc.

  • Perform many experiments cheaply once model built

  • Avoid implementing ineffective solutions

Return to Path

Diagram Equation


Models are only an approximation of the reality

There is many type of models:

Physical (e.g. mimic panel) vs. mathematical

Quantitative vs. qualitative

First principles vs. empirical

Steady state vs. dynamic

Type and level of precision of a model will depend on many factors such as:

Phenomena represented

Level of detail and granularity

Assumptions

Kind of input required

Functions performed

(constraint satisfaction? optimization? …)

Nature of output generated

Models Are Only an Approximation of the Reality

Return to Path

Diagram Equation


Content11

Content

  • Process Simulation

  • Process Integration

  • Mass Integration

  • Energy Integration

  • LCA

  • Integrating these tools to address MIM


Process integration

Process Integration

Definitions:

  • “Process integration is a holistic approach to process design, retrofitting, and operation which emphasizes the unity of the process.” (El-Halwagi, 1997)

  • “The holistic analysis of processes involving the following elements:

    • Process data;

    • Systems and tools;

    • Process engineering principles and in dept process sector knowledge.”(Stuart, 2002)


Content12

Content

  • Process Simulation

  • Process Integration

  • Mass Integration

  • Energy Integration

  • LCA

  • Integrating these tools to address MIM


Mass integration

Mass Integration

Definition:

“Systematic methodology that provides a fundamental understanding of global flows of mass within the process and employs this holistic understanding in identifying performance targets and optimizing the generation and routing of species throughout the process”(El-Halwagi, 1997)

  • Pollution prevention is one of the most important

    objectives of mass integration!

Return to Path

Diagram Equation


Principles of mass integration

Principles of Mass Integration

  • Mass integration is based on chemical engineering principles combined with system analysis.

  • Mass flow must be represented from a species viewpoint:

    • For each targeted species, there are sources (streams that carry the substances) and sinks (reactors, heaters/coolers, etc.).

    • Streams living the sinks become sources.

    • The sinks can be generator of targeted species.

    • Each sink/generator can be manipulated through design or their operations can be changed in order to affect the flow rate and composition of what each sink/generator accepts as discharges.

  • Sources are generally prepared for sinks through segregation and separation via waste interception network.

  • Effective pollution prevention can be reached by combination of stream segragation, mixing, interception, recycle from sources to sinks and sink/generator manipulations.

Return to Path

Diagram Equation


Segregation recycle interception and sink generator manipulation

Segregation, Recycle, Interception and Sink/Generator Manipulation

Sources

Segregated

Sources

Sinks/

Generators

Sources

(back to

process)

Mass and Energy-Separating

Agents In

  • Segregation: Avoiding the mixing of the streams.

  • Recycle: Utilization of pollutant-laden stream (a source) in a process unit (a sink).

  • Interception: Utilization of separation unit operation to adjust the composition of the pollution-laden streams to make them acceptable for sinks.

  • Sink/Generator manipulation: Design or operation of changes that alter the flowrate or composition of pollutant-laden streams entering or leaving the process units.

Waste

Interception

Network

1

2

Nsink

Mass and Energy-Separating

Agents Out

(To Regeneration and Recycle)

Return to Path

Diagram Equation

Source: El-Halwagi, 1997


Content13

Content

  • Process Simulation

  • Process Integration

  • Mass Integration

  • Energy Integration

  • LCA

  • Integrating these tools to address MIM


Energy integration

Energy Integration

Definition:

“Systematic methodology that provides a fundamental understanding of energy utilization within the process and employs this understanding in identifying energy targets and optimizing heat-recovery and energy-utility systems”(El-Halwagi, 1997)

Energy integration tool:

Thermal-pinch techniques are based on thermodynamic principles and are used, among others, to identify minimum heating and cooling utility requirements.


Principles of thermal pinch

Cold

Utility

Hot

Utility

Utility costs decrease

$

Costs related to exchange area increase

PROCESS

Trade-off

Trade-off

Principles of Thermal Pinch

Reduction of Utilities

Internal Exchanges

… toward 100% internal exchanges

From 100% utilies…


Composite curves

Composite Curves

Definition:

Composite Curves consist of temperature-enthalpy (T-H) profiles of heat availability in the process (the “hot composite curve”) and heat demands in the process (the “cold composite curve”) together in a graphical representation.


Grand composite curve

Grand Composite Curve

The grand composite curve is the tool that is used for setting multiple utility targets.


Grand composite curve example of application

Grand Composite CurveExample of Application


Heat exchanger network design key steps

Heat Exchanger Network DesignKey Steps

Heat and Mass Balances

Data Extraction

Process

Simulation

  • Analysis

  • Targeting

  • Process Modifications

  • Utility Selection

PINCH

ANALYSIS

Total Site

Analysis

Design

Selection of Alternatives

Project Detailling

Source: Linnhoff March,1998


Content14

Content

  • Process Simulation

  • Process Integration

  • Mass Integration

  • Energy Integration

  • LCA

  • Integrating these tools to address MIM


What is lca

What is LCA

Definitions:

  • A systematic set of procedures for compiling and examining the inputs and outputs of materials and energy and the associated environmental impacts directly attributable to the functioning of a product or service system throughout its life cycle.”(Source: ISO 14040: Life cycle assessment – principles and framework, 1998)

  • "Life Cycle Assessment is a process to evaluate the environmental burdens associated with a product, process, or activity by identifying and quantifying energy and materials used and wastes released to the environment; to assess the impact of those energy and materials used and releases to the environment; and to identify and evaluate opportunities to affect environmental improvements. The assessment includes the entire life cycle of the product, process or activity, encompassing, extracting and processing raw materials; manufacturing, transportation and distribution; use, re-use, maintenance; recycling, and final disposal".(Source: Guidelines for Life-Cycle Assessment: A 'Code of Practice', SETAC, Brussels, 1993 )


Example life cycle of newspaper

ExampleLife Cycle of Newspaper


Lca methodology

LCA Methodology

Applications:

  • Development and improvement of products

  • Strategic planning

  • Public policy development

  • Marketing

  • Others

Interpretation

Goal and Scope

Definition

Invetory

Analysis

Impact

Assessment

Other tools:

  • Technical

  • Economic

  • Market

  • Social

  • etc

For more information on each LCA methodology

steps, click on the corresponding box.

Limitations


Goal and scope definition

Goal and Scope Definition

The goal of an LCA study shall unambiguously state the intended application, the reasons for carrying out the study and the intended audience, i.e. to whom the results of the study are intended to be communicated.


Goal and scope definition1

the functions of the product system, or, in the case of comparative studies, the systems ;

the functional unit ;

the product system to be studied ;

the product system boundaries ;

allocation procedures ;

data requirements ;

assumptions ;

types of impact and methodology of impact assessment, and subsequent interpretation to be used ;

limitations ;

initial data quality requirements ;

type of critical review, if any ;

type and format of the report required for the study.

Goal and Scope Definition

The scope of the LCA consists in:


Function

Function

Definition:

Service supplied by a system of product or a process unit.

Examples:

Return to

the scope


Functional unit

Functional Unit

Definition:

« Quantified performance of a product system for use as a reference unit in a life cycle assessment study »

Examples:

Return to

the scope


Product system

Product System

Definition:

« Collection of materially and energetically connected unit processes which performs one or more defined functions »

Environment

Unit process

A

Elementary flow

Elementary flow

Intermediate flow

Unit process

B

Elementary flow

Elementary flow

Intermediate flow

Unit process

C

Elementary flow

Elementary flow

Product flow

Environment

Return to

the scope


System boundaries

System Boundaries

Definition:

« Interface between a product system and the environment or other product systems »

Environment

Unit process

A

System boundaries

Elementary flow

Elementary flow

Intermediate flow

Unit process

B

Elementary flow

Elementary flow

Intermediate flow

Unit process

C

Elementary flow

Elementary flow

Product flow

Environment

Return to

the scope


Allocation

Allocation

  • Most industrial processes comprise more that one output product, and raw material inputs include intermediate products. These processes are multifunctional.

  • In LCA terms, this means that the product system under system provides more functions than the one related to the functional unit. A decision will have to be taken in order to decide how to split flows and environmental intervention between these functions. This is allocation: “partitioning the input or output flows of a unit process to the product system under study”

  • The allocation procedures must respect the mass conservation rules.

  • The production of by-products as well as the open loop recycling are two common situations implicating allocation.


By products

By-Products

Definition:

A by-product can be defined as an output which is neither the primary product neither a waste.

Example:

Suppose you have a system with primary function to produce paper. In this system, you have a unit process which is wood sawing and which results in two products, chips and lumber. Only chips will be used in the wood manufacturing, lumber will be sent out of the system and use in another one. So, in the system which has as main funtion to produce paper, lumber is a by-product.


Open vs close loop recycling

Open vs. Close-Loop Recycling

Close-loop recycling:

The product is reused in the same product system to produce the same product.

  • No allocation required!

    Close-loop recycling:

    Recycling of one product from on system to another.

  • Allocation of environmental impacts and credits of recycling will have to be allocated between both system.

Return to

the scope


Inventory analysis

Inventory Analysis

Definition:

“Phase of life cycle assessment involving the compilation and quantification of inputs and outputs, for a given product system throughout its life cycle”

(Source: ISO 14041)


Life cycle impact assessment

Life Cycle Impact Assessment

Definition:

“Phase of life cycle assessment aimed at understanding and evaluating the magnitude and significance of the potential environmental impacts of a product system”

(Source: ISO 14042)


From inventory to impact assessment

From Inventory to Impact Assessment

Impact

Inventory

Resource Depletion

Production

Processes

Resource

Depletion

Resource Depletion

Emissions:

CFC

Pb

Cd

HAP

COV

DDT

CO2

SO2

NOX

P

Dust

Etc.

Agregated Indicator

Global Warming

Ozone Depletion

Ecotoxicology

Human Health

Smog

Acidification

Eutrophication

Etc…

Mortality and

Diceases

Energy

Production

Ecosystem

Depletion

Waste

Disposal &

Management

Aesthical

Value

Transport

Solid

Wastes

Solid Wastes

Solid wastes

Problem Approach

“Midpoint”

Damage Approach

“Endpoint”

PRECISION


Interpretation

Interpretation

Definition:

“Phase of life cycle assessment in which the findings of either the inventory analysis or the impact assessment, or both, are combined consistent with the defined goal and scope in order to reach conclusions and recommendations”

(Source: ISO 14043)


Lca main limitations

LCA Main Limitations

  • Site-specific impact are not well considered

  • Steady-state approach

  • Linear modeling

  • Based on a number of technical assumptions and value choices for instance:

    • Impact categories

    • Characterization models

    • System boundaries

    • Weighting of impacts

  • Availability and reliability of data and models


Content15

Content

  • Process Simulation

  • Process Integration

  • Mass Integration

  • Energy Integration

  • LCA

  • Integrating these tools to address MIM


In summary

In Summary

  • Minimum Impact Manufacturing aims at minimizing:

    • Resource consumption

    • Energy consumption

    • Environmental impact (soil, air and water emissions)

  • Simulation are useful to better understand the process

  • Mass integration is a tool to reduce resource consumption and reject in the environment

  • Energy integration is a tool that allows for a better utilization of the energy

  • LCA allows for a holistic evaluation of environmental impacts over the product chain


Integration of tools to address mim

Integration of Tools to Address MIM

  • MIM is a multi-objective problem involving the best trade-offs between:

    • Minimum resource consumption;

    • Minimum energy consumption;

    • Minimum air emissions;

    • Minimum water emissions;

    • Minimum solid wastes.

  • This is also submitted to a lot of complicated constraints:

    • Process constraints ;

    • Technology constraints;

    • Life cycle interactions;

    • Costs.

  • For these reasons, integration of PI tools to address MIM is not obvious.


References2

References

  • El-Halwagi, Mahmoud M. Pollution Prevention through Process Integration, Academic Press, San Diego, USA, 1997, 318 p.

  • ISO 1997. Management environnemental – Analyse du cycle de vie Principes et cadres.CAN/CSA-ISO 14040:1997

  • ISO 1998. Management environnemental – Analyse du cycle de vie – Définition de l’objectif et du champ de l’étude et analyse de l’inventaire. CAN/CSA-ISO 14041:1998

  • ISO 2000. Management environnemental – Analyse du cycle de vie – Analyse de l’impact du cycle de vie.CAN/CSA-ISO 14042:2000

  • ISO 2000.Management environnemental – Analyse du cycle de vie – Interprétation du cycle de vie. CAN/CSA-ISO 14043:2000

  • Linnhoff March. 1998. Introduction to Pinch Technology. http://www.linnhoffmarch.com/pdfs/PinchIntro.pdf (page consulted in 2004)


Program for north american mobility in higher education introducing process integration for environmental control in eng

QUIZ


Question 1

Question 1

What is one of the main characteristics of kraft processes?

  • The mechanical pulp

  • The necessity to bleach the pulp

  • The chemical recovery system

  • Its low water consumption


Question 2

Question 2

Which of the following unit processes generates the most sulfur compound emissions?

  • Oxygen delignification

  • Bleaching

  • Pulping (digester)

  • Recovery furnace


Question 3

Question 3

Toward which of the following elements is MIM oriented?

  • Reducing air emissions

  • Reducing solid wastes

  • Maximising shareholder value

  • a and b

  • a, b and c


Question 4

Question 4

Which of these technical problem can be associated to process closure?

  • Accumulation of undesirable elements in the recovery system

  • Higher cost of utility

  • Higher energy consumption

  • Need of more pulping chemicals


Question 5

Question 5

Which of these tracking model will you use if one component can be accurately tracked while another one cannot

  • Fixed split model

  • Flow ratio model

  • Species ratio model

  • Degree of freedom equation


Question 6

Question 6

Which of these is not a characteristic of BAT?

  • They must be economically achievable

  • They must be process unit oriented

  • They must be process oriented

  • They must be product oriented


Question 7

Question 7

Which of the following will not decrease Kraft mill energy consumption

  • Water consumption reduction

  • Chips screening

  • Less piping

  • Changing ECF bleaching for TCF bleaching


Question 8

Question 8

Which of the following trade-offs is the most communly associated with energy integration?

  • Reducing energy while increasing water consumption

  • Capital vs. operating costs

  • Energy vs. chemical costs

  • Time horizon vs. energy savings


Question 9

Question 9

Which of the following correspond to segregation in mass integration?

  • Avoiding the mixing of the streams.

  • Utilization of pollutant-laden stream (a source) in a process unit (a sink).

  • Utilization of separation unit operation to adjust the composition of the pollution-laden streams to make them acceptable for sinks.

  • Design or operation of changes that alter the flowrate or composition of pollutant-laden streams entering or leaving the process units.


Question 10

Question 10

Which of the following can be described as a functional unit?

  • The production of kraft pulp

  • The production of kraft pulp during 10 hours

  • The production of 1 admt kraft pulp

  • b and c


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