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Core Strength Training: Tier I for All!. Dean Richards. Targets. Universal Screening Core Instruction delivered with Fidelity Tier 1 Data-Based Decision Making. In other words. . . . . I want you to have a massively ripped core!. Evaluating your Core Program.

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Core strength training tier i for all

Core Strength Training: Tier I for All!

Dean Richards


Targets

Targets

  • Universal Screening

  • Core Instruction delivered with Fidelity

  • Tier 1 Data-Based Decision Making


In other words

In other words. . . .

I want you to have a massively ripped core!


Core strength training tier i for all

Evaluating your Core Program


Essential features of cbm tools

Essential Features of CBM Tools

  • Robust indicator of academic health

  • Brief and easy to administer

  • Can be administered frequently

  • Must have multiple, equivalent forms

    • (If the metric isn’t the same, the data are meaningless)

  • Must be sensitive to growth


Good screening tools

Good Screening Tools

Screening tools are NOT designed to:

  • Identify specific instructional levels for individual students

  • Identify WHY some students will need more support

  • Evaluate individual teachers

  • Take a large amount of instructional time and vary between classrooms

Screening Tools are designed to:

  • Compare all students to the same grade-level standard

  • Accurately identify those who are on track to meet grade level expectations, and those who will need more support

  • Evaluate the quality of your schoolwide instructional system

  • Be efficient, standardized, reliable, and valid


Core strength training tier i for all

Maze

EasyCBM

AIMSweb ORF

DIBELS

Math Computation

Math Applications

Math Tests of Early Numeracy

Writing (Total Words Written)

Writing (Correct Word Sequences)

Quick Phonics assessment

QRI-IV

CORE Multiple Measures Assessment

DRA2

Fountas and Pinnell

Report cards

OAKS standards

Unit Tests, core curriculum weekly tests on skills that are learned

Screeners

Not Screeners


Talk to a neighbor

Talk to a neighbor

What was something that you already knew about screeners?

What was something new about screeners?

Are there questions you still have about screeners?


Strong data analysis guides decisions

Strong data analysis guides decisions

“However beautiful the strategy, you should occasionally look at the results.”

--Winston Churchill,

British prime minister


Do not get stuck in problem admiring

Do not get stuck in problem admiring


Do not get stuck in problem admiring1

Do not get stuck in problem admiring


Tier 1 core team guiding questions

Tier 1/Core Team Guiding Questions


Guiding questions

Guiding Questions

  • Based on districtwide screening data, is our core program sufficient for most students?

    • Review and analyze benchmark screening data.

      • Determine percentage of students at low risk, some risk and at-risk levels

      • Determine percentages compared to previous years and earlier in the year

      • Determine percentages of student movement amongst levels

    • Review annual OAKS testing data.

      • Determine percentage of students meeting minimum proficiency standards as set by the district

        • For example, Proficiency > 35%ile


Types of assessment

Types of assessment

  • Screeners

    • CBMs

  • Mastery assessment

    • Weekly tests

    • Novel tests

  • Diagnostic Assessment

    • DRA, Phonics assessment, QRI

  • Program Assessment

    • OAKS


Determine percentage of students at low risk some risk and at risk levels

Determine percentage of students at low risk, some risk and at-risk levels


Determine percentages compared to previous years and earlier in the year

Determine percentages compared to previous years and earlier in the year


Determine percentages of student movement amongst levels

Determine percentages of student movement amongst levels

Intensive at Beginning of the year

Strategic at Beginning of the year

Benchmark at Beginning of the year

13

16

66

1

60

6

12

3

0

3

10

0


Core strength training tier i for all

OAKS

  • Passing OAKS 3rd grade (204) places a child in the 17th percentile

  • Passing 3rd grade is not enough.

  • By 5th grade, if these students stay at the same percentile they will fail OAKS

  • By 10th grade, if these students stay at the same percentile they will fail OAKS

  • This student will score a 236 and pass at the 32nd percentile

Based on 2009-2010 ODE percentiles


What does your screening data look like

What does your screening data look like?

?


Talk to a neighbor1

Talk to a neighbor

What was something that you already knew about data analysis?

What was something new about data analysis?

How is this system a new or different way of looking at data?


Avoiding tbu

Avoiding TBU

True But Useless

Moving from data collection and analysis to action on data.


How s your herd

How’s your herd?


Weak core instruction

Weak core instruction


Strong core instruction

Strong core instruction


Interventions

Interventions

Disconnected

Time consuming

Difficult to schedule

Requires trained personnel

Expensive


In other words1

In other words

We cannot solve the herd problem one cow at a time.

We need a system to feed them all well.


Core strength training tier i for all

vs.


Core strength training tier i for all

Essential Components of Effective Reading Instruction

  • Overtly teaching each step through teacher modeling and many examples (Gradual Release Model).

Explicit

Systematic

Practice and Mastery

Application and Feedback


Core strength training tier i for all

Essential Components of Effective Reading Instruction

  • Breaking lessons and activities into sequential, manageable steps that progress from simple to more complex concepts and skills. i.e. scope and sequence of program

Explicit

Systematic

Practice and Mastery

Application and Feedback


Core strength training tier i for all

Essential Components of Effective Reading Instruction

  • Providing many opportunities for students to respond and demonstrate what they are learning, which may include teacher modeling, rehearsal, and feedback.

Explicit

Systematic

Practice and Mastery

Application and Feedback


Core strength training tier i for all

Essential Components of Effective Reading Instruction

  • Generalize what is learned in different contexts. We want students to apply the lessons to the next text they read.

Explicit

Systematic

Practice and Mastery

Application and Feedback


How does it help a struggling reader to be in core

How does it help a struggling reader to be in core?

  • They need the most instruction

  • Need to be exposed to grade level material

  • If they miss grade level material, they will never catch up

  • Just because there is a deficit in one area, does not mean there is a deficit in all areas of reading

  • Interventions are limited in scope


Talk to a neighbor2

Talk to a neighbor

What do you do to accommodate the struggling reader in your class?


In other words2

In other words

A flabby core means you will have more students in need of intervention!


Core strength training tier i for all

What now?


Instructional needs

Instructional needs

  • What are the common instructional needs of the students this grade level?

    Often we will need additional sources of information to be able to answer this question well!!!


Instructional needs1

Instructional needs

Phonemic Awareness

  • Word comparison

  • Rhyming

  • Sentence segmentation

  • Syllable segmentation and blending

  • Onset-rime blending and segmentation

  • Blending and segmenting individual phonemes

  • Phoneme addition, deletion and manipulation


Instructional needs2

Instructional needs

Phonics

  • Letter sounds

  • VC and CVC

  • Consonant Digraphs

  • CVCC and CCVC

  • Silent E

  • R-control vowels

  • Advanced consonants (i.e.,-tch, kn, soft c &g)

  • Vowel Teams

  • Multi-syllable words

  • Prefixes and suffixes


Instructional needs3

Instructional needs

Fluency

  • Accuracy

  • Prosody

    • Expression

    • Emphasis

    • Phrasing

    • Volume

    • Smoothness

  • Rate

    • CWPM

The old man the vegetable garden.


Instructional needs4

Instructional needs

Vocabulary

  • Contextual Analysis

  • Morphemic Analysis

  • Expressive Vocabulary

  • Receptive Vocabulary

Center for Teaching and Learning, University of Oregon


Instructional needs5

Instructional needs

Comprehension

  • Text Structure

  • Make Inferences and Analyze

  • Evaluate

  • Story Structure

  • Generate Questions

  • Summarize

  • Monitor Comprehension

Keep in mind:

Reading OAKS strand information is more related to the difficulty of the passage than the ability for the student to use the skill


Talk to a neighbor3

Talk to a neighbor

What was something that you already knew about Instructional needs?

What was something new about instructional needs?

Are there questions you still have about instructional needs?


Identify and celebrate what works

Identify and celebrate what works

i) What has worked?


Identify and celebrate what works1

Identify and celebrate what works

  • Examine the data

  • Which teachers/grade levels/buildings have people heard are successful?

  • Opportunities for peer observation?

    • Coach or administrator cover class for 20 minutes


Instructional adjustments

Instructional adjustments

  • What agreements can the grade level make on common instructional strategies?


Common instructional strategies

Common Instructional Strategies

Example


An example

An example

Instructor provides explicit instruction

  • Sets the purpose for the instruction

    • Post target for the students and yourself

      • Language, learning, and behavior targets

    • Let students know what you want them to learn and why there is a sense of urgency

    • Focus wall


Active engagement of all students

Active engagement of all students

iii) What agreements can the grade level make on common active engagement strategies?

How will you increase active engagement to increase the effectiveness of the instruction?


Active engagement of all students1

Active engagement of all students

How many times it takes to learn something new

  • Average Learner

  • Everybody else

  • Truly disabled student

    Jo Robinson (2008)

4-14 times

14-250 times

250-350 times


Active engagement of all students2

Active engagement of all students

  • The “no-hands” classroom

    • Hand Raising “hits the best and leaves the rest”

    • If there hand is raised then you don’t need to call on them!

  • Choral Responses

  • Partner Responses


Active engagement of all students3

Active engagement of all students

  • Increase student talk time (i.e. 10:2 strategy)

  • Partnerships (assigned, specific roles)

  • Multiple turns leads to multiple opportunities

    • More turns = more practice


Active engagement

Active engagement

  • Think/pair/share

  • Think/write/share

  • Choral response

  • Jobs/roles of students

  • Graphic organizer in use as a response to instruction

  • Physical gestures; hand signals

  • White board responses

  • Manipulatives

  • Students are meaningfully engaged in reading, writing or talking about the content of the lesson

  • Cooperative groups are productively engaged in dialogue, discourse or learning activities

  • Guided practice is evident

  • Student self assessment

Lesson activities

Amy Petti & Tara Black. Adapted from LBUSD


Active participation dr anita archer

Active ParticipationDr. Anita Archer

  • Note the active participation procedures that are directly taught to students.


Active participation dr anita archer1

Active ParticipationDr. Anita Archer


Talk to a neighbor4

Talk to a neighbor

What was something that you already knew about active participation?

What was something new about active participation?

How were active participation skills directly taught to students?


Core strength training tier i for all

  • What can you do to improve your teaching of the core to fidelity?

    • Large group and small group instruction

    • Pacing


Why is fidelity important

Why is fidelity important?

  • Comprehensive program incorporates all components of reading

    • Students have the opportunity to make connections across texts

    • Students read text that supports vocabulary, phonics, and comprehension lessons

  • The whole school has a common language, common goal, and common tools.


Core strength training tier i for all

Fidelity to the core

The core program provides the answer to what we teach. . . . we must bring our best instruction to answer “how we teach.”

--Amy Petti, PSU


Hanz and franz say

Hanz and Franz say:

Your must have different types of workouts to have a ripped core!


Large group instruction

Large group instruction

  • Text is designed to be the initial instruction

  • Whole group text may be above or below some students

  • Whole group instruction should be a limited amount of time

    • Mini lessons should be mini

    • If students listen for 10 minutes, why talk for 30?


Large group instruction1

Large group instruction

  • Text is used as a model to teach literacy skills

  • All students have access to the main selection (listen, read aloud by teacher or other adult, partner read, read alone)


Small group instruction

Small Group Instruction

  • Text is at the students instructional level

  • Conducted in small, flexible groupings

  • The text is focused on the needs of the students

  • This is a time to meet the individual needs of each student


Small group instruction1

Small Group Instruction

  • Each student has their own copy of the text and they read independently while the adult observes their reading behaviors (this is not round robin reading)

  • The adult explicitly guides the students and addresses errors the students are making

  • After the students read, the adult leads a group discussion


How much of each

How much of each?

  • You should spend more time face to face with your most struggling readers?

    Is this fair?

    There is only 2 kinds of fair. . .

    state and county

    It is all about the end result!


How much of each1

How much of each?

  • You should spend more time face to face with your most struggling readers?

  • Meet with your most struggling readers daily for at least 15 minutes.

    • Eyeballs on the text

    • Practice does not make perfect, but perfect practice makes perfect. Corrective feedback is important.


Professional development

Professional development

  • What are your professional development needs and goals?

    These can be tied to your professional development plan, observations and PDUs.


Professional development1

Professional development

  • Model lessons by coach or peer

  • Peer lesson observation

  • Substitute time for team planning

  • Visit high performing schools within the district or area

  • In school experts training at staff meetings

  • Instructional highlights at staff meetings

  • Don’t forget Paraprofessionals!


Talk to a neighbor5

Talk to a neighbor

What professional development opportunities can we create in tough economic times?


Improving your core

Improving Your Core

90 min reading block structure

Explicit, systematic, feedback, application

Professional Development

Fidelity


Set fresh goals

Set fresh goals

c) Establish an end of the year goal to work toward for the percentage of student you would like to see in each tier based on assessment data.


Establish an end of the year goal of percentages in each tier

Establish an end of the year goal of percentages in each tier


A ripped core is the goal

A ripped core is the goal!!!

Questions????


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