Meaningful Parent Involvement and Meeting the Requirements

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Regular, two-way, and meaningful communication about student learning and other school activities;Parents playing an integral role in helping their child learn;Full partnerships for parents in decision?making and on advisory committees, andCarrying out other activities such as those described in section 1118 (includes building capacity).(Section 9101(32) ESEA).

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Meaningful Parent Involvement and Meeting the Requirements

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1. Meaningful Parent Involvement and Meeting the Requirements Federal Program Directors Meeting Thursday, September 30, 2010

2. Regular, two-way, and meaningful communication about student learning and other school activities; Parents playing an integral role in helping their child learn; Full partnerships for parents in decision–making and on advisory committees, and Carrying out other activities such as those described in section 1118 (includes building capacity). (Section 9101(32) ESEA) Defining Parental Involvement

3. “A fruitful connection between the school and the home is built upon purpose, communication, education, and association.” Dr. Sam Redding - Executive Director, Academic Development Institute The connections between all stakeholders in the school do not happen by accident or happenstance. They must be built with intention and coordinated activities.The connections between all stakeholders in the school do not happen by accident or happenstance. They must be built with intention and coordinated activities.

4. ESEA requires (a few examples) Development and review of the district policy, school policy and school-home compact with the input of parents Parent input on allotment of parent involvement funds Parent input on schoolwide plan Parent review of AYP status Use requirements to your advantage Notification and Consultation Actions and Documentation Checklist Title I-A Parent Involvement Toolkit www.sedl.org/connections/toolkit/ www.sde.idaho.gov/site/parentInvolvement/ (templates and additional information) Parent Participation

5. Four core beliefs have been identified that serve as the foundation for the work of engaging families. Core Beliefs We can talk compliance all day but when it really comes down to it, isn’t educating children much more than compliance? Why did you become an educator in the first place? We can talk compliance all day but when it really comes down to it, isn’t educating children much more than compliance? Why did you become an educator in the first place?

6. The “curriculum of the home” is the bundle of habits, attitudes, knowledge and skills acquired through the family relationship. (Redding, The Mega System, 2006) When we are talking about “all parents” wanting the best for their children and having the ability to support their children’s learning, we are really talking about each families strengths; their habits, attitudes, knowledge and skills. No matter what we may think or feel about a families make-up, do we always hold them with the highest regard and believe their children can achieve?When we are talking about “all parents” wanting the best for their children and having the ability to support their children’s learning, we are really talking about each families strengths; their habits, attitudes, knowledge and skills. No matter what we may think or feel about a families make-up, do we always hold them with the highest regard and believe their children can achieve?

7. Parenting Communicating Demonstrating academic support Declaring importance of education Conveying trust by granting autonomy Cultural Proficiency, Guerra & Nelson, 2009 Involvement & “Curriculum of the Home”

8. Actions by families to support their own children Traditionally viewed as participation in formal school-oriented activities, school events and volunteering at school Involvement Do the parents know the expectations?Do the parents know the expectations?

9. Lack of visible involvement is not a lack of caring Perception of distinct roles of teachers and parents in the educational process Invisible Involvement Studies show that Latino parents perceived their role as providing nurturing, teaching values, and instilling good behavior Teacher role is to teach and provide the education. Explain – what it is, how it is done, and how it benefits their children Again, expectations. Expectation that if you care about your child you will find some way to come to the school.Studies show that Latino parents perceived their role as providing nurturing, teaching values, and instilling good behavior Teacher role is to teach and provide the education. Explain – what it is, how it is done, and how it benefits their children Again, expectations. Expectation that if you care about your child you will find some way to come to the school.

10. Expectations of the parents for the school Expectations of the school for the parents Communicate our expectations Teach the necessary information/skills ESEA supports us: Parent involvement policies and compact Annual meeting National Center for Family Literacy www.famlit.org Expectations In a relationship how do you communicate expectations? What is the most effective way you have found to do this in your schools? What opportunities do parents have to learn the expectations of your school? Is it in the student handbook? In a relationship how do you communicate expectations? What is the most effective way you have found to do this in your schools? What opportunities do parents have to learn the expectations of your school? Is it in the student handbook?

11. What builds the home / school connection? Purpose Communication Education Association Critical Question: How does your school currently address home/school connections? Connections Between Home and School Sense of purpose; it is communicated by all that parents are not only welcome but encouraged. Communication to parents confirms their value in the educational process. Educating parents as to the opportunities and ways they can be involved not only at the school but in building a conducive environment at home for their children to learn. This is not “value based” ; all families have strengths, it’s often our ability to identify them and help parents see them that will catapult parents into a place where they see they have something to contribute. Association, do they feel associated with the school or do they feel further isolated?Sense of purpose; it is communicated by all that parents are not only welcome but encouraged. Communication to parents confirms their value in the educational process. Educating parents as to the opportunities and ways they can be involved not only at the school but in building a conducive environment at home for their children to learn. This is not “value based” ; all families have strengths, it’s often our ability to identify them and help parents see them that will catapult parents into a place where they see they have something to contribute. Association, do they feel associated with the school or do they feel further isolated?

12. Barriers to Achieving the Beliefs Fear of being called “racist” or insensitive Worry about losing power and control Fear of unfriendly oversight or micromanagement of classrooms Concerns about physical safety Fear of being misunderstood Feeling inadequate to deal with conflict and controversy Low confidence in parents’ knowledge and judgment Clinging to “safe” and traditional types of family involvement (Beyond the Bake Sale, 2007). Barriers: Fear of being misunderstood; Feeling inadequate to deal with conflict and controversy; Low confidence in parents’ knowledge and judgment; Clinging to “safe” and traditional types of family involvement Barriers: Fear of being misunderstood; Feeling inadequate to deal with conflict and controversy; Low confidence in parents’ knowledge and judgment; Clinging to “safe” and traditional types of family involvement

13. Translation, transportation, child care, time of day Understanding of education system Understanding of roles and responsibilities Low confidence in own knowledge and understanding Additional Barriers

14. Breaking Down the Barriers Leadership committed to changing beliefs and modeling positive attitudes and practices. Safe place for teachers and staff to talk about their fears and concerns, then address each one. Required element of policy; schools are required to break down barriers that prevent parents from being involved. Written policies help break down barriers by clarifying expectations. Barriers to school choice and supplemental education services; LEP students etc, etc. Required element of policy; schools are required to break down barriers that prevent parents from being involved. Written policies help break down barriers by clarifying expectations. Barriers to school choice and supplemental education services; LEP students etc, etc.

15. “We began to make real headway when we stopped assuming we knew what our parents felt, wanted, or hoped for their children. Only when we began to sincerely listen did we really hear.” Dryfoos and Maguire, 2002

16. Assist parents to become active participants in education of their children. Schools policies can be used to outline training, information, and coordination of activities. Building Capacity Ask them what they want. Building relationships Communicate our expectations for parent involvement and empowerment.Ask them what they want. Building relationships Communicate our expectations for parent involvement and empowerment.

17. What is it? What will it do for our school? Identify areas of noncompliance Help ensure compliance is achieved Provide templates and info in areas your school would like to improve Cultural shift; perceptions, expectations, motivations, clarify goals and help create a plan Provides high quality, researched based resources, training components and tools for staff and parents Parent Involvement Analysis, Academic Development Institute

19. www.sde.idaho.gov/site/parentInvolvement/ Click on Schools and Districts for drop down Click on link to PIA How do I access the PIA tool?

21. User Name: spaces are needed ( IL District 01 ) Password: is NOT case sensitive User Name: spaces are needed ( IL District 01 ) Password: is NOT case sensitive

24. “Schools must become places where families feel wanted and recognized for their strengths and potential.” Bellen & Moles, 1994

25. Connection between families and educators on broader goals of the school. Can all staff members verbalize broader goals of the school? How are those goals communicated to parents? ESEA supports us Schoolwide / targeted assistance plans School improvement plans Input on use of parent involvement funds PACs Engagement Schoolwide plans, LEP program; Invite and educate/orientSchoolwide plans, LEP program; Invite and educate/orient

26. Personal connection is the fastest way to dispel assumptions and build relationships that will be mutually beneficial. Are there successful ways staff members at your school connect with parents? Are they replicable? Think about sharing these at the next staff meeting; ask teachers who connect well with parents to share ideas. Leverage your community. What strengths does your community have? How could you build on those strenths? Ask for help. Connect. Share ideas. Outreach and Connection I didn’t think they meant me – A parent was attending her first parent event at a school after the parent coordinator had personally invited her. A teacher asked, “Did you ever get the flyers we sent home about workshops for parents?” The parent replied, “yes, I got the flyers and stuff about what’s going on at the school. But I didn’t think they meant me. I didn’t think they wanted me to come. Example of invite to important meeting and no follow up.I didn’t think they meant me – A parent was attending her first parent event at a school after the parent coordinator had personally invited her. A teacher asked, “Did you ever get the flyers we sent home about workshops for parents?” The parent replied, “yes, I got the flyers and stuff about what’s going on at the school. But I didn’t think they meant me. I didn’t think they wanted me to come. Example of invite to important meeting and no follow up.

27. Parents and families having actual ownership of the school and full partnerships in decision-making. ESEA supports us Regular meetings for formulating and responding to recommendations. District plans. Empowerment Efficacy – ability to affect changeEfficacy – ability to affect change

28. Does how we look at things make a difference? How do you want to see parents get involved vs. how they want to / can they be involved? What would support your schools? What could you do to better support students and parents right now? Perceptions How do we ask parents to be involved? How do we communicate to them? Tone of voice, sense of purpose, importance of their perspective and role they play in education of their children.How do we ask parents to be involved? How do we communicate to them? Tone of voice, sense of purpose, importance of their perspective and role they play in education of their children.

29. “Some people look at our kids as disadvantaged because they don’t speak English, because they come from a culture other than mainstream America, because there is crime and tremendous obstacles in our community, because they don’t stand out as individualistic. You know, Latino kids like to hang in groups. And I say if you look at the Fortune 500 companies, what are they looking for? Bilingual, bicultural, collaborative, resilient people.... My kids are who they want to hire.” —Kent Scribner, Superintendent, Isaac School District, Phoenix, AZ

30. Take two minutes and write down one thing you can do when you get back to improve communication with parents. Think about…. Communication Idea sharing Shared Leadership and Decision Making What are you already doing well? Where do we start?

31. www.families-schools.org Cultural Proficiency, National Staff Development Council www.nsdc.org “Latino Communities & Schools: Tapping Assets for Student Success,” Principal Leadership, October 2007 National Network of Partnership Schools (NNPS) www.nnps.org Beyond the Bake Sale: The Essential Guide to Family-School Partnerships The Center for Comprehensive School Reform and Improvement www.centerforcsri.org Academic Development Institute (ADI) www.adi.org/ Solid Foundation www.adi.org/solidfoundation/ National Parent Information and Resource Center (PIRC) www.nationalpirc.org/ Parent Information Resource Center (PIRC) www.idahopirc.org Minnesota Parent Center (PIRC) www.pacer.org/index.asp Parent Training and Information Centers (PTI) www.ipulidaho.org/ Additional Resources and References

32. Boise—Family Advocates Nicole Sirak, Executive Director America Carrion, Program Manager www.familyadvocate.org [email protected] [email protected] 3010 W. State St. Ste 104 Boise, Idaho 83703 Parent Information and Resource Centers (PIRCs) Administrating Organization

33. CDA—ICARE / St. Vincent de Paul Paul Katie Simmons – Program Coordinator [email protected] www.icareforchildren.org 201 E. Harrison Ave. Coeur d’Alene, Idaho 93914 (208)676-1515 Idaho Falls—Help Inc. Holly Whitworth, PAT Coordinator www.helpincidaho.org/index.html 1465 Hoopes Ave. Idaho Falls, Idaho 83404 (208)522-5545 Nampa/Caldwell—Advocates Against Family Violence (AAFV)  Cori Stapley- Director www.hopesdoor.org PO Box 1596 Caldwell, ID 83606 (208) 459-6279 Pocatello—Family Services Alliance Pat Blackaby, Program Coordinator www.familyservicesalliance.com/ 355 S. Arthur Avenue Pocatello, ID 83204 (208) 232-0742 Parent Information and Resource Centers (PIRCs)

34. What was the score of the Boise State Oregon State game? What is the definition of “parental involvement” we discussed at the beginning of the session? Who completes the first two sections of the Parent Involvement Analysis? What does PIRC stand for? Why is parent involvement important? Where was my spelling error? Questions and Quiz….. 1. 37-24 2. Regular, two-way, and meaningful communication about student learning and other school activities 3. Principal Parent Information and Resource Center Best answer wins! 6. Slide 26 “strengths” was spelled strenths1. 37-24 2. Regular, two-way, and meaningful communication about student learning and other school activities 3. Principal Parent Information and Resource Center Best answer wins! 6. Slide 26 “strengths” was spelled strenths

35. Discussion and Questions…

36. Matt Hyde Parent and Community Involvement Coordinator State Department of Education 208-332-6917 [email protected] http://www.sde.idaho.gov/site/parentinvolvement

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