English as an additional language: the national picture and Ofsted update
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English as an additional language: the national picture and Ofsted update Mark Sims HMI Institute of Education Wednesday 13 March 2013. Objectives. Achievement of pupils with EAL The revised framework September 2012 and implications for EAL Good practice observed. EAL Achievement.

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English as an additional language: the national picture and Ofsted update Mark Sims HMI

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English as an additional language the national picture and ofsted update mark sims hmi

English as an additional language: the national picture and Ofsted update

Mark Sims HMI

Institute of Education

Wednesday 13 March 2013


Objectives

Objectives

  • Achievement of pupils with EAL

  • The revised framework September 2012 and implications for EAL

  • Good practice observed


Eal achievement

EAL Achievement


English as an additional language the national picture and ofsted update mark sims hmi

Language Diversity and attainment in English secondary schools: a scoping study(London Metropolitan University May 2012

  • While other first language speakers, and minority ethnic pupils in general, attain better results in London, there are still persistent gaps in attainment between English first language, and other first language speakers, nationally.

  • There are large attainment gaps in the Yorkshire and the Humber and the North West regions, which need further exploration.

  • Overall, many of the widest attainment gaps are present in local authorities with substantial Pakistani ethnic minority groups – for example, Peterborough, Oldham, Bedford, Bury, Derby, Sheffield, and Calderdale – who tend to speak Urdu, Punjabi or Mirpuri and experience economic disadvantage. This association clearly needs further examination.


English as an additional language the national picture and ofsted update mark sims hmi

Language Diversity and attainment in English secondary schools: a scoping study(London Metropolitan University May 2012

  • There is clearly a need for further research into new ethnic communities from Eastern Europe, whose educational and language profile, and needs, tends to be obscured in the White, or White Other

  • Similarly, Black African ethnic groups need to be specified in relation to language to gain a fuller picture of their educational achievements. In particular, more recent migratory flows from Central and East Africa (e.g. Congo, Angola, and Zimbabwe).


Eal figures from raiseonline 2013

EAL: figures from raiseonline 2013


Eal pupils figures 1997 2011

EAL Pupils figures 1997 - 2011


More than 1 million eal learners in english schools

More than 1 million EAL learners in English schools

  • The results of the 2012 School Census published today show that the number of EAL learners in state schools in England has topped the million mark for the first time. The School Census, undertaken in January 2012 by the Department for Education, shows that one in six or 577,555 primary school pupils is an EAL learner. This rise is matched in the secondary figure which stands at 417,765, or 12.9% of the secondary school population. When pupils in special schools and pupil referral units are included, the total number of bilingual pupils in English state schools is 1,007,090.

    (NALDIC News Friday 22 June 2012)


The number of pupils for whom english is not their first language 2009 2012

The number of pupils for whom English is not their first language 2009 - 2012


The proportion of pupils in secondary schools in 2012 raiseonline 2013

The proportion of pupils in secondary schools in 2012 (Raiseonline 2013)

  • Free school meals 26.7%

  • Minority ethnic groups 23.5%

  • School Action, SA Plus or Statemented 20.2%

  • First language not English 13.0%


The proportion of pupils in primary schools in 2011 raiseonline 2013

The proportion of pupils in primary schools in 2011 (Raiseonline 2013)

  • Free school meals 26.2%

  • Minority ethnic groups 27.7%

  • School Action, S A Plus or Statemented 18.5%

  • First language not English 17.5%


Section 5 inspections

Section 5 inspections


Handbook for the inspection of schools from september 2012

Handbook for the inspection of schools from September 2012

Judging the quality of the school

Inspection is primarily about evaluating how well individual pupils benefit from their school. It is important to test theschool’s response to individual needs by observing how well it helps all pupils to make progress and fulfil their potential. Depending on the type of school it may be relevant to pay particular attention to the achievement of:

  •  disabled pupils, and those who have special educational needs

  •  those with protected characteristics, as defined by the Equality Act 2010

  •  boys

  •  girls

  •  the highest and lowest attainers

  •  pupils for those for whom the pupil premium provides support including:

  •  looked after children

  •  pupils known to be eligible for free school meals

  •  children of service families

  •  those receiving alternative provision (Para 98, pp 23/24)


Handbook for the inspection of schools from september 20121

Handbook for the inspection of schools from September 2012

Judging the quality of the school - Footnote

  • Pupils with protected characteristics and other groups of pupils may include: pupils for whom English is an additional language; minority ethnic pupils; Gypsy Roma and Traveller children; lesbian, gay and bisexual pupils; transgender pupils; young carers, and; other vulnerable groups.

    (Footnote p24)


What does outstanding practice look like www goodpractice ofsted gov uk

What does outstanding practice look like ? /www.goodpractice.ofsted.gov.uk/


Coordinating english as an additional language a specialist role ofsted 2010 key findings

Coordinating English as an additional language – a specialist role (Ofsted 2010) – Key findings

  • Level of expertise good or better in just under half of schools visited

  • Outstanding when mainstream teachers well trained and involved in provision

  • Level of expertise not so good in schools with smaller numbers and more rural areas

  • Variety in status of EAL coordinator

  • Overdependence on local authority to do work for school

  • Even without EAL expertise, some schools did well because of ethos and supportive environment and empathy with pupils’ language and culture


Eal good practice case studies

EAL Good Practice Case Studies

Feltham Community College, Hounslow

  • Students learning English as an additional language make outstanding progress through a combination of good teaching, rigorous assessment and monitoring procedures, and a tailored curriculum.

    Cheetham Church of England Community School, Manchester

  • The school provides a welcoming environment for parents and children who are new to the UK so that they settle well. Pupils make rapid progress in learning English as an additional language through opportunities for speaking, including in their home language, and a well trained school community.


Eal good practice case studies1

EAL Good Practice Case Studies

Cranford Park Primary School, Hillingdon

  • The school is raising the achievement of pupils for whom English is an additional language, so that by the time they leave at the end of Key Stage 2, pupils have fulfilled their potential by exceeding the national expectations in attainment in English for their age, or have considerably narrowed the gap with other pupils.

    Cherry Orchard Primary School, Greenwich,

  • Pupils develop as enthusiastic and able linguists because celebrating and building on the wide range of languages spoken is at the heart of the school’s work. This starts in the nursery and consistent, regular provision delivered by highly skilled teachers ensures rapid and sustained progress.


Eal good practice case studies2

EAL Good Practice Case Studies

Belle Vue Girls’ School, Bradford

  • Students learning English as an additional language achieve extremely well in Urdu and Arabic because the school ensures these languages are used to help students develop their thinking and literacy skills, which enables them to succeed in their examinations.

    Greet Primary School, Birmingham

  • Pupils learning English as an additional language do exceptionally well at Greet Primary School because the outstanding teaching they receive throughout the school is complemented by high-quality support and a language-rich curriculum. As a result, pupils develop highly advanced writing skills.


The pupil premium how schools are spending the funding successfully to maximise achievement

The Pupil Premium: How schools are spending the funding successfully to maximise achievement


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