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Methods for collection, preservation, and sporulation of snake fecal stages to help resolve what we still don’t know about snake coccidia PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Methods for collection, preservation, and sporulation of snake fecal stages to help resolve what we still don’t know about snake coccidia. Steve J. Upton (Kansas State University) Donald W. Duszynski (University of New Mexico).

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Methods for collection, preservation, and sporulation of snake fecal stages to help resolve what we still don’t know about snake coccidia

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Methods for collection, preservation,

and sporulation of snake fecal stages

to help resolve what we still don’t

know about snake coccidia

Steve J. Upton

(Kansas State University)

Donald W. Duszynski

(University of New Mexico)


Snake coccidia are usually treated like most other coccidia

1-3% potassium dichromate

in Petri dish. Check daily

You may have

problems with

some Sarcocystis spp.

You may have

problems with some

thin-walled eimerians


Only 4 snake families

seem have been examined “extensively” for coccidia

Boidae

Colubridae

Elapidae

Viperidae


Several coccidian genera

are easily recognizable in snakes

sporocysts/sporozoites

CaryosporaLeger 1904 (1 and 8)

EimeriaSchneider 1875 (4 and 8)

IsosporaSchneider 1881 (2 and 8)

SarcocystisLankester 1882 (2 and 8)


Cylindrical eimerian oocysts are common in all families of snakes

Eimeria bitis

(Bitis arietans)

Eimeria papillosum

(Salvadora grahamiae)

Eimeria “zamenis”

(Coluber contrictor)


All known ‘elongate’

species develop in

gall bladder

epithelium

They can

accumulate in

the gall bladder

in very large

numbers


Brief family overview


Boidae

(19 host genera)

A. Caryospora epicratesi

B. Eimeria boae

D, E. Eimeria pythonis

F. Eimeria samyadeli

C. Tyzzeria boae


Elapidae

(63 host genera)

A. Caryospora cobrae

B. Caryospora constanciae

C. Caryospora micruri

D. Caryospora regentensis

E. Eimeria micruri

F. Eimeria najae

G. Caryospora demansiae


Viperidae

(Crotalinae)

A. Caryospora bigenetica

B. Caryospora jararacae

C. Caryospora jararacae

D. Eimeria amarali

E. Eimeria amareli

F. Eimeria bothropis

G. Eimeria cascabeli


Viperidae

(Viperinae)

A. Caryospora maculatus

B. Caryospora matatu

C. Caryospora simplex

D. Caryospora simplex

E. Caryospora maxima

F. Eimeria atheridis

G. Eimeria bitis

H. Eimeria cerastes

I. Isospora gursae


Colubridae

(331 host genera)

Generanamed species

Caryospora30

Eimeria 40

Eimeria (elongate)15+

Isospora 4


Few (true) isosporans seem to exist in snakes

Most described species are either

Sarcocystis or avian isosporans


Isospora colubris

from Hierophis viridiflavis

(syn. Coluber viridiflavis)

from Matuschka (1986) Parasitol Res 72: 549-551

Isospora wilsoni

from the colubrids

Tantilla gracilis & T. relicta

from Upton et al (1992) TAMS 111:50-60


Isospora guersae

Vipera lebatina (Viperidae)

(from Yakimoff & Matschoulsky 1937)

Isospora guzarica

Platyceps karelini (Colubridae)

(from Davronov 1985)


Some Sarcocystis described as isosporans

“Isospora minuta” DasGupta 1938

Naja naja (Elapidae)

“Isospora lenti” Pinto 1934

Bothrops jararaca (Viperidae)


More recent Sarcocystis descriptions

Sarcocystis ameivamastigodryasi Lainson & Paperna, 2000

Ameiva (Teiidae) / Mastigodryas (Colubridae)

Sarcocystis atheridis Slapeta et al 1999

Lemniscomys (Muridae) / Atheris (Viperidae)


Sarcocystis


Caryospora

Develop in snake

intestine

Develop in rodent

dermal tissues

Form transmissible

“caryocysts” (I)


Caryospora “caryocyst”


Caryospora may have two lineages

Caryospora

bigenetica

Caryospora

duszynskii

Caryospora

peruensis


Summation of snake coccidia

Tends to be higher prevalence and diversity

in tropical (higher humidity) areas

Most snake coccidia tolerate 1-3% aqueous

potassium dichromate

Gall bladder eimerians common in all taxa

Caryospora / Sarcocystis common in all taxa


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