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The definition of interpersonal communication:

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The definition of interpersonal communication: An ongoing process in which individuals exchange messages whose meanings are influenced by the history of the relationship and the experience of the participants . How do we define culture? (p. 35) Traditionally:

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slide1
The definition of interpersonal communication:

An ongoing process in which individuals exchange messages whose meanings are influenced by the history of the relationship and the experience of the participants.

slide2
How do we define culture? (p. 35)
  • Traditionally:

A learned system of knowledge, behaviors, attitudes, beliefs, values, and norms that is shared by a group of people.

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No more “subcultures”?
  • Different genders, gays, lesbians, African Americans, Jews, Amish, Mennonite, Asians, Latinos all comprise a co-culture?
  • “Co” alludes to equal or “partnered” cultures… Are these other cultures really equals?
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Low context culture - Language primarily expresses thoughts and ideas (U.S.) (p. 39)
  • High-contextculture - Relies heavily on subtle, nonverbal cues (Asia) (p. 39)
  • North Americans tend to talk about their attributes – I am short, tall, fat, etc.
  • Chinese, Filipinos, South Americans – I am father, employee, etc.
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Individualistic culture – primary responsibility is helping themselves (p. 40)
  • Collective culture – team mentality; loyalties to extended family, communities (p. 40)
  • Power distance (Hofstede) – degree in which society members accept unequal distribution of power. Ex. Rich and poor – each are all good people. (All on p. 42)
  • High power distance cultures respects authority and is submissive.
  • Low power distance cultures support the notion that challenging authority is acceptable.
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Uncertainty avoidance – degree to which members of a culture feel threatened by ambiguous situations. (p. 43)
  • Achievement vs. nurturing -- Material success versus relationships. (p. 44)
  • Task/Social Roles (p. 60).
  • Ethnocentrism (p. 56)
  • Different communication cues
  • Stereotyping/prejudice (p. 57)
  • Assuming similarity
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Linguistic Determinism – The worldview of a culture is shaped and reflected by the language of its members. (p. 48)
  • Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis (p. 49): Language Shapes a Culture! Words within a culture can become a part of every day life.
  • How has language shaped our culture?
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Be knowledgeable, motivated, and skilled… BUT can these things erase intrinsic beliefs?
  • Learn more about the culture/ask questions—does this matter?
  • Develop a “third culture”—huh?
  • Tolerate ambiguity (p. 55).
  • Develop mindfulness—conscious awareness.
  • Avoid negative judgments about another culture—is it that simple?
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