Georgia governor s office of highway safety pre grant application training workshop
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Georgia Governor’s Office of Highway Safety Pre-Grant Application Training Workshop. May 12, 2008. Carol P. Cotton, PhD Director, Traffic Safety Research and Evaluation Group University of Georgia, College of Public Health Dept. of Health Promotion and Behavior

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Georgia governor s office of highway safety pre grant application training workshop

Georgia Governor’s Office of Highway Safety Pre-Grant Application Training Workshop

May 12, 2008

Carol P. Cotton, PhD

Director, Traffic Safety Research and Evaluation Group

University of Georgia, College of Public Health

Dept. of Health Promotion and Behavior

(706) 542-2804; fax (706) 583-0753

[email protected]


Purpose

Purpose…

  • Write a grant that allows you to:

    • Show effectiveness of your program

    • Implement programs that are relevant for your community

    • Be innovative

  • Communication with GOHS and UGA program evaluation team is important

  • Asking questions is important


Objectives activities and evaluation your program

Objectives, Activities and Evaluation = Your Program

  • Mission Statement

  • Goals

  • Objectives

  • Activities

Mission Statement

Goals

Objectives

Activities


Writing good objectives

Writing Good Objectives

  • Objectives are:

    • Small steps

    • More precise than program goals

    • Steps that, if completed, will lead to reaching the program goal(s)

  • Objectives outline in measurable terms the specific changes that will occur in the target or primary population at a given point in time as a result of exposure to the program


Writing good objectives1

Writing Good Objectives

  • Objectives:

    • Provide direction

    • Are useful in the evaluation process

    • Must be clearly understood

    • Must state what is to be accomplished

    • Must be measurable

  • Objectives have 4 elements/parts:

    • What = outcome

    • When = time or conditions

    • Who = primary or target population

    • How much = achievement criterion or change


Writing good objectives2

Writing Good Objectives

Measurability

  • Outcomes (what)

    • Defined as the action, behavior, or something else that will change as a result of the program (the verb in the objective)

    • Verbs such as appreciate, internalize, understand are NOT good choices

    • Verbs such as adopt, apply, complete, change, demonstrate, describe, identify, improve, facilitate, participate, practice, reduce, score, submit, test, try, volunteer ARE good choices

    • The verb must refer to something measurable and observable


Writing good objectives3

Writing Good Objectives

Measurability

  • Conditions or Time (when)

    • The conditions under which the outcome will be observed or,

    • When it will be observed

  • Examples:

    • Upon completion of the class

    • As a result of participation

    • By the year 2009

    • When asked to respond by the teacher

    • Verbally in class


Writing good objectives4

Writing Good Objectives

Measurability

  • Criterion (how much)

    • The ‘benchmark’ for deciding when the outcome has been achieved or,

    • How much change will occur

    • The standard of successful or appropriate performance

  • Examples:

    • To no more than 105 per 1,000

    • With 100% accuracy

    • As presented in the lecture

    • 300 pamphlets

    • 95% (of the motor vehicle occupants)


Writing good objectives5

Writing Good Objectives

Measurability

  • Primary/Target Population (who)

    • Who will change

  • Examples:

    • 1,000 teachers

    • All employees of the company

    • Those residing in Fulton and Clayton Counties

    • Class participants


Good objective

Good Objective

  • By January 1, determine the attitudes of a random sample of Clarke County residents about highway safety issues.

    • Primary population: Clarke County residents

    • Outcome: determine

    • Conditions: by January 1

    • Criterion: a random sample


Good objective1

Good Objective

  • By the end of the grant period, car seats that meet federal standards will be distributed to all program participants.

    • Primary population: all program participants

    • Outcome: will be distributed

    • Conditions: By the end of the grant period

    • Criterion: meet federal standards


Smart objectives

SMART Objectives

  • S = STRAIGHT FORWARD

    • Simple statements that everyone can understand

  • M = MEASURABLE

    • An item or situation you can count or observe

  • A = ACTION-ORIENTED

    • The stronger the action verb, the stronger the objective

  • R = REALISTIC

    • Only commit to what you have a reasonable chance of accomplishing

  • T = TIME-SPECIFIC

    • Have a deadline


Evaluation

Evaluation

  • Objective: By January 1, determine the attitudes of a random sample of Clarke County residents about highway safety issues.

  • Activities:

    • Design the attitude survey (or locate an already developed instrument)

    • Hire staff to implement the survey

    • Implement the survey

    • Analyze the data

  • Evaluation:

    • Write and submit a report by January 1 that includes the results of the attitude survey.


Milestone chart

Milestone Chart


Original milestone chart

Original Milestone Chart


Evaluation data collection instruments

Evaluation & Data Collection Instruments

  • Clearly Written

  • Pre & Post should be identical

  • Relevant

  • Do not make assumptions

  • Submit data collection instruments

  • We’ll be happy to review them!


Key points

Key Points

  • Increase, decrease, relative change = baseline data & a 2nd measure

  • A well-thought out program is consistent

  • Keep evaluation simple

    • Don’t collect data you don’t need

  • Evaluate each objective

  • ACCOUNT FOR EVERYTHING

    • On milestone chart OR in monthly report

    • Value-added items should be separate


Communication

Communication

  • Channels

    • Electronically via e-mail: [email protected] or [email protected] or [email protected]

    • Phone: (706) 542-2804; 583-0893

    • Fax: (706) 583-0753

  • When contacted by UGA evaluation team…

    • Copy emails to [email protected]

    • please ask questions if unclear


Questions

Questions


Contacts

Carol P. Cotton, PhD

Director, Traffic Safety Research and Evaluation Group

University of Georgia, College of Public Health

Dept. of Health Promotion and Behavior

(706) 542-2804; fax 583-0753

[email protected]

James Barlament

Research Professional

University of Georgia, College of Public Health

Dept. of Health Promotion and Behavior

(706) 583-0893; fax 583-0753

[email protected] or [email protected]

Contacts


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