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Targeting Transition SEACO Introduction. designed by John D. Wessels, Ten Sigma 209 S. 2 nd St., P.O. Box 846 Mankato, MN 56002-0846 507-345-7557 or 800-657-3815 [email protected] Introductory Workshop Agenda. Challenges of transition Transition skills defined at four levels

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Targeting Transition SEACO Introduction

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Targeting transition seaco introduction

Targeting TransitionSEACO Introduction

designed by

John D. Wessels, Ten Sigma

209 S. 2nd St., P.O. Box 846

Mankato, MN 56002-0846

507-345-7557 or 800-657-3815

[email protected]


Introductory workshop agenda

Introductory WorkshopAgenda

  • Challenges of transition

  • Transition skills defined at four levels

  • Surveys at four levels to assess transition strengths/needs

  • Rubrics that define transition skills in detail

  • Rubrics used to write measureable annual transition goals

  • Rubrics used to collect data

  • Forms used to track multi-year Progress

  • Technology tools enhance success

  • Using the Targeting Transition program


Md sd version targeting transition

MD/SD VersionTargeting Transition

Section 1:

Challenges of Transition


Overview of osep indicator 13 transition process

Overview of OSEP Indicator 13 Transition Process

1. Identify meaningful postsecondary goals.

- education and/or training

- employment

- independent living (if necessary)

2. Base Postsecondary goals on age-appropriate assessment.

3. Identify measurable annual transition goals to meet

postsecondary goals.

4. Secure transition services to meet postsecondary goals.

5. Manage outside services (engage adult providers).

6. Develop a course of study (list of classes) to meet

postsecondary goals.


What we need to do

What We Need to Do

Questions we must help students answer:

  • What are my postsecondary goals for . . .

    . . . education/training?

    . . . employment?

    . . . independent living?

  • How will I meet my postsecondary goals?

    • What IEP goals would help me reach my goals?

    • What transition services would help me reach my goals?

    • What courses would help me reach my goals?


Targeting transition seaco introduction

Targeting Transition Model

Post School Goals

Training/Education - Employment - Independent Living

  • Assessment

  • Identify transition strengths and needs

  • Hard-copy

  • Online

  • Multiple Year Progress Reporting

  • Hard-copy

  • Online

  • Comprehensive

  • Transition Skills

  • Research-based

  • Identified for four levels

  • Activities

  • Mild and Moderate

  • Lessons

  • Interviews

  • Evaluations

  • Plans to improve

  • Real situations

  • Rubrics

  • Clarify expectations

  • Simplify goal writing

  • Teach skills clearly

  • Collect better data

  • Annual Goal

  • Management

  • Rubric editing

  • Goal writing

  • Data collection


Md sd version targeting transition1

MD/SD VersionTargeting Transition

Section 2:

Transition Skills Defined at Four Levels


Transition assessment four levels for four specific transition needs

Transition AssessmentFour Levels for Four Specific Transition Needs

  • Rubrics for Transition for Higher-Functioning Students

  • Rubrics for Transition for Students with Moderate Disabilities

  • Rubrics for Transition for Autism Spectrum Students

  • Rubrics for Transition for Students with Severe Disabilities

Moderate Disabilities


Types of transition skills in manuals

Workplace Skills/Attitudes

controlling emotions

making good choices

being personally organized

Responsibility

following directions promptly

accepting responsibility

following a schedule

Interacting with Others

interacting in a group setting

listening

being friendly

Computer and Internet

using assistive technology

manage email programs

Basic Academic Skills

basic reading, writing, and math

money, time, and temperature

Habits of Wellness

grooming/hygiene

safety

household and kitchen chores

Planning for Success

advocating for self

participating in comm. resources

Types of Transition Skills in Manuals


Md sd version targeting transition2

MD/SD VersionTargeting Transition

Section 3:

Surveys at Four Levels to Assess Transition Needs


Targeting transition surveys simplify assessment process

Targeting Transition Surveys Simplify Assessment Process

  • Surveys display all skills on one page.

  • Simple system promotes success.

    • “S” marked for strengths.

    • “N” marked for needs.

    • Circled N marked for priorities.

    • Left blank for “okay”.

  • Survey results focus discussion and attention.

  • Teacher keeps a master completed survey to write the IEP.


Targeting transition seaco introduction

Higher-Functioning Survey

Survey contains 65 transition skills for students who will live independent adult lives.


Targeting transition seaco introduction

Moderate Disabilities Survey

Survey contains 61 transition skills for students who will live somewhat dependent adult lives.


Targeting transition seaco introduction

Autism SpectrumSurvey

Survey contains 63 transition skills for students on the autism spectrum.


Targeting transition seaco introduction

Severe Disabilities Survey

Survey contains 43 transition skills for students who will lead dependent adult lives.


Md sd version targeting transition3

MD/SD VersionTargeting Transition

Section 4:

Rubrics that Define Transition Skills in Detail


Rubrics define each transition skill

Rubrics Define Each Transition Skill

Rubrics…

  • Clarify expectations.

  • Simplify IEP goal management.

  • Provide the basis of instruction.

  • Enhance data collection.


Example of a transition rubric

Date Priority

Set and Met

Rubric Title

(Need/Priority)

Scale

Major Criteria

  • Subcriteria

  • Specific skills

  • Details for objectives

  • Criteria for lessons

Example of a Transition Rubric


Targeting transition seaco introduction

Higher-Functioning Rubric Sample


Targeting transition seaco introduction

Moderate Disability Rubric Sample


Targeting transition seaco introduction

Severe Disability Rubric Sample


Targeting transition seaco introduction

Autism Spectrum Rubric Sample


Md sd version targeting transition4

MD/SD VersionTargeting Transition

Section 5:

Rubrics Used to Write Annual Transition Goals


Complexity of goal writing

Complexity of Goal Writing

Concept level (learn several skills/tasks under a goal).

  • Appropriate for mild to high-moderate students.

  • Short-term objectives more appropriate.

    Task/Skill level (learn several details of a task or skill).

  • Appropriate for moderate to low-moderate students.

  • Benchmark/objectives more appropriate based on student.

    Detail level (learn to complete a single step of a task).

  • Appropriate for high-severe to mid-severe.

  • Benchmarks more appropriate form of defining goals


Use a consistent scoring system

Use a Consistent Scoring System

1. Doesn’t demonstrate skill regardless of cueing.

2. Dependent setting with multiple cues (whatever it takes).

3. Dependent setting with no more than one cue.

4. Dependent setting with no cueing.

5. Independent setting with no more than one cue.

6. Independent setting with no cueing.


Measurable goal and objectives concept level with objectives

Measurable Goal and Objectives Concept Level with Objectives

Goal: Over 36 weeks, John will increase his ability to keep and follow a schedule from needing multiple cues in a dependent setting to needing no more than one cue in a dependent setting 4 out of 5 times as measured by a teacher check-off sheet.

NA

Short-Term Objectives:

1.Given five supervised situations with no more than one cue per situation, John will organize his daily schedule 4 out of 5 times.

2.Given five supervised situations with no more than one cue per situation, John will follow his daily schedule4 out of 5 times.

* Major criteria “3” is NA (not applicable) for this student in this situation)—Mark NA

NA

NA


Measurable goal and objectives skills tasks level with objectives

Measurable Goal and Objectives Skills/Tasks Level with Objectives

Goal: Over 36 weeks, John will increase his ability to use toilet facilities correctlyfrom needing multiple cues in a dependent setting to needing no cues in an independent setting, as measured by a student check-off sheet, monitored by the case manager.

NA

NA

Short-Term Objectives:

1.Given five situations and no cueing, John will independently identify when he needs to use the toilet 4 out of 5 times.

2. Given five situations and no cueing, John will independently sit on the toilet correctly 4 out of 5 times.

3. Given five situations and no cueing, John will independently use toilet paper correctly 4 out of 5 times.

4. Given five situations and no cueing, John will independently flush the toilet 4 out of 5 times.

NA

NA

NA


Measurable goal and objectives skills tasks level with benchmarks

Measurable Goal and Objectives Skills/Tasks Level with Benchmarks

Goal: Over 36 weeks, John will increase his ability to use toilet facilities correctly by identifying he needs to use the toilet, sit on the toilet correctly, use toilet paper correctly, and flush the toilet when finishedfrom needing multiple cues in a dependent setting to needing no assistance in a dependent setting, as measured by a check-off sheet, monitored by the teacher.

NA

NA

Benchmark One: By November 15, given

five dependent situations and no more than

three cues, John will use the toilet facilities

correctly 4 out of 5 times.

Benchmark Two: By February 15, given

five dependent situations and no more than

one cue, John will use the toilet facilities

correctly 4 out of 5 times.

Benchmark Three: By May 15, given

five dependent situations and no assistance,

John will use the toilet facilities correctly 4

out of 5 times.

NA

NA

NA


Measurable goal and objectives detail level with benchmarks

Measurable Goal and Objectives Detail Level with Benchmarks

Goal: Over 36 weeks, John will increase his ability to make eye contact when verbal directions are given, from needing multiple cues in dependent settings to needing no cues in independent settings.

Benchmarks:

1.By December 1, given five dependent situations where verbal directions are given and whatever cueing is necessary, John will make eye contact 4 out of 5 trials.

2. By February 15, given five dependent situations where verbal directions are given and no more than one cue, John will make eye contact 4 out of 5 trials.

3. By June 1, given five independent situations where verbal directions are given and no cueing, John will make eye contact 4 out of 5 trials.


Section 6 rubrics used to collect data

MD/SD VersionTargeting Transition

Section 6:

Rubrics Used to Collect Data


Manuals include rubrics in editable form in rubricmaker software

Manuals Include Rubrics inEditable Form in RubricMaker Software

  • RubricMaker software includes rubrics for four levels.

    • higher-functioning (mild)

    • moderate disabilities

    • severe disabilities

    • autism spectrum

  • Search for rubrics.

  • Edit existing rubrics.

  • Design new rubrics.


With the rubricmaker

Management Scale

With the RubricMaker

Turn Management Rubrics . . .

Into Data Collection Tools

Data Collection


With the rubricmaker1

Progress Reports

Management Scale

With the RubricMaker

Into Progress Reports

Turn Management Rubrics . . .


Section 7 forms used to track multi year transition progress

MD/SD VersionTargeting Transition

Section 7:

Forms Used to Track Multi-Year transition Progress


Targeting transition progress report

x

x

x

x

x

x

Targeting Transition Progress Report

Student’s

postsecondary

goals (PS, EM,

HL, RL, and CP)

To which PS

goal(s) the

skill applies.

Method used

to manage

skill (goal,

service, course)

“Q” progress

for IEP goals

Indicates year in

school a

skill is a

priority.

T

C


Use a portfolio system to collect multi year progress

Use a Portfolio System toCollect Multi-Year Progress

  • Use tracking form as a portfolio to keep . . .

    . . . multi-year transition progress

    . . . completed rubrics

    . . . transition services info

    . . . completed surveys

    . . . invitations, permissions, etc.

  • Pass the portfolio on to the next transition teacher, provider, or give to the student upon graduation.


Section 8 technology tools enhance success

MD/SD VersionTargeting Transition

Section 8:

Technology Tools Enhance Success


Trax online transition planner electronically manage transition planning

TRAX Online Transition PlannerElectronically Manage Transition Planning

  • Select from four surveys.

    • Adapt surveys (add/remove skills).

    • Design own surveys.

  • Email surveys to transition team.

  • Automatically score and graph results.

  • Print IEP team meeting information.

    • Print a variety of result views.

    • Print plan summary.

  • Print selected rubrics.

  • Print progress report.


Trax online progress manager electronically manage data collection and progress

TRAX Online Progress ManagerElectronically Manage Data Collection and Progress

  • Edit rubrics.

    • Change wording to clarify expectations.

    • Change scales to enhance data collection.

  • Print rubrics in data collection form.

  • Generate measurable goals.

  • Score and graph goal progress.

  • Track progress over multiple years.


Activities for transition

Activities for Transition

  • Available for two levels of transition student.

    • For higher-functioning (mild) students.

    • For students with moderate disabilities (somewhat dependent).

  • Variety of activities.

    • Lessons.

    • Interviews/observations/practice activities.

    • Evaluations/planning for improvement.

    • Authentic tasks (call, write, order, do).

    • Certificates of strength and accomplishment.

  • Activities available in two forms.

    • In a hard copy, seven-volume set.

    • Online access.


Section 9 using the targeting transition program

MD/SD VersionTargeting Transition

Section 9:

Using the Targeting Transition Program


Targeting transition seaco introduction

Evaluating the

Targeting Transition

Implementation

A. Have you established a

multi-year plan for transition?

B. Have you written measurable

annual goals to help meet

postsecondary goals?

C. Are you managing the

acquisition of needed transition

skills and services?

D. Are you tracking progress over

multiple years?

E. Are you writing IEPs that meet

the expectations of Indicator 13?


Objectives of training

Objectives of Training

  • Identify meaningful postsecondary goals.

  • Assess transition strengths and needs.

  • Write effective IEPs.

  • Write meaningful measurable annual goals.

  • Collect meaningful data.

  • Provide needed transition services.

  • Guide students into and/or provide needed courses.

  • Track transition progress over multiple years.

  • Meet the expectations of Indicator 13.

  • Use technology to enhance transition success.


Basic training breakdown

Basic Training Breakdown

  • Initial training (one day in classroom setting).

    • Targeting Transition material.

    • Using Targeting Transition procedures.

    • Managing the transition process.

    • Meeting Indicator 13 expectations.

  • Advanced training (½ day in computer setting).

    • Review of procedures and materials.

    • Sharing of efforts, discussion, and questions answered.

    • Editing rubrics using the RubricMaker.


Basic training costs

Basic Training Costs

  • Basic materials ($145 per teacher).

    • Choice of Rubrics for Transition manual.

      • for Higher-Functioning Students

      • for Students with Moderate Disabilities

      • for Students on the Autism Spectrum

      • for Students with Severe Disabilities

    • Rubrics (all four levels) in editable form on CD.

  • Basic training costs.

    • Honorarium ($800 per day for one or two days).

    • Actual travel expenses (air/ground, hotel, meals).

  • Optional material/programs.

    • Hard copy or online access to Activities for Transition.

    • TRAX Online Transition Planner .

    • TRAX Online Progress Manager (available in fall 2009).


Train trainers

Train-Trainers

  • Initial two-day training conducted at selected site.

  • Trainer material.

    • Training PowerPoint material.

    • All forms digitally in original (editable) and pdf formats.

    • Pilot access to all Targeting Transition products.

  • Trainer training costs.

    • Initial $500 per participant (minimum 10 or pay expenses).

    • Ongoing $250 per participant per year.

      • Ongoing updates through online webinars.

      • Access to updated program and training material.

      • Membership in trainer network (available in fall 2009).


Material costs

Material Costs

Price

$145 ea

$145 ea

$145 ea

$145 ea

$520 set

$495 set

$495 set

$65 ea

$60 ea

Varies

Varies

Rubrics for Transition Manuals and CD-ROM

  • Rubrics for Transition I: for Higher-Functioning Students. . . . . . . . . . . . .

    —65 skills for students who will live independent lives as adults

  • Rubrics for Transition II: for Students with Moderate Disabilities. . . . . . .

    —61 skills for students who will live somewhat dependent adult lives

  • Rubrics for Transition III: for Students on the Autism Spectrum . . . . . . . .

    —63 skills for students on the autism spectrum

  • Rubrics for Transition IV: for Students with Severe Disabilities. . . . . . . . .

    —43 skills for students who will live dependent adult lives

  • All four Rubrics for Transition manuals. (Product #451). . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    Activities for Transition (Hard-copy manuals)

    • for Higher-Functioning (independent) students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    • for Students with Moderate Disabilities (somewhat dependent) . . . . . . . . .

      Access to activities for Transition online (Higher-Functioning and Moderate)

    • Single-user for one year . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    • Five or more users for one year . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

      Access to TRAX Online Transition Planner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

      Access to TRAX Online Progress Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Options recommendations

Options/Recommendations

  • Visit our website: www.tensigma.org/transition.

    • Download sample material.

    • Read about the program in more detail.

    • Download a PowerPoint summary of the program.

    • Contact people familiar with the program.

  • Talk to Ten Sigma staff at (800)-657-3815.

  • Purchase material.

  • Schedule training by Ten Sigma staff.

  • Set up a Train-Trainers system.

  • Develop group plan/pricing.


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